<link>http://www.ambaile.org.uk/</link> <logo url="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/images/logo.gif"/> <atom:link rel="next" href="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/?language=en&service=search&action=do_quick_search&q=&rss_mode=1&page=2"/> <item> <title>Ferry at Ballachulish, 1920s A ferry, probably 'Glencoe I', at the Ballachulish side of Loch Leven c1926. The vehicle is a mid to late 1920s Daimler Limousine. Can you help us identify the make and model of the vehicle? If so, please contact us http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2321998&mime_type=&launchZoom=21998 Car in the grounds of Ord Cottage, Muir of Ord This photograph, taken during the 1950s, shows an Inverness registered car with the number plate ST9516. The picture was taken in the grounds of Ord Cottage at Muir of Ord, Ross-shire and the owner is Mr Jack Gordon. Seated in the car is his son. It has been suggested that the car is a Citroen Traction Avant. If you can help us identify the type of car, please do contact us http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2330309&mime_type=&launchZoom=30309 Devil's Elbow, Cairnwell Pass The Devil's Elbow is the name given to a double hairpin bend with a gradient of 33%, located on the old road between Glen Shee and Braemar. The mountain pass between Glen Shee and Braemar is known as the Cairnwell Pass and is the highest main road in the UK. The summit of the Cairnwell Pass has an elevation of 670 metres (2199 ft), and the Devil's Elbow is located approximately one mile from the summit. The Devil's Elbow is now bypassed by a wider modern road, but the old road can still be seen. It has been suggested that the car is a late 1930s Plymouth Special Deluxe Sedan. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2328978&mime_type=&launchZoom=28978 J Ferries' Car Showroom, Inverness J Ferries & Co.'s car showroom and headquarters at the Eastgate, Inverness. The vehicles pictured outside the garage are, from left to right, a Triumph TR3, a Standard Vanguard Phase 3 Sportsman, and a basic model Vanguard Ensign. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2321187&mime_type=&launchZoom=21187 SMT's Vauxhall car showroom, Inverness Showroom of the Scottish Motor Traction Company Ltd at 71-79 Academy Street, Inverness. Facing the camera is a Vauxhall PA Cresta. It is flanked by F Series Vauxhall Victors and more PA Crestas. A Bedford CA Van can be seen towards the rear on the right. SMT also owned garages at 25 Duncraig Street and 7 Rose Street, and 'lock-up' garages on Union Road. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2321292&mime_type=&launchZoom=21292 Chapman's Garage on King Street, Inverness The showroom at Chapman's Garage on King Street, Inverness. A variety of Ford motor cars are on display. On the left, nearest the camera, is a Ford Consul and behind that is a Ford Anglia 100E and a Ford Prefect. Nearest the camera on the right are two Ford Anglia 100Es. Behind those is a Ford Prefect and a Ford Popular x2 (Anglia or Prefect). At the very back is a 100E. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2321115&mime_type=&launchZoom=21115 Grand Hotel, Highland Hotel and MacRae & Dick's Garage, Fort William A view through the centre of Fort William, looking towards the Highland Hotel, formally the Station Hotel. MacRae & Dick's Garage and the Grand Hotel can be seen at centre right and left. Fort William is a town on Loch Linnhe on the west coast at the southern end of the Caledonian Canal in the shadow of Ben Nevis. A town in Lochaber was first mooted by the Parliament of Scotland in 1597 but it wasn't until the time of Cromwell's Commonwealth that General Monk built a fortress here in 1654-55. Originally called Inverlochy 2000 troops were garrisoned here along with a number of workmen, servants, wives and children who settled in a village near to the fort. There numbers were gradually increased, according to the Memoirs of Sir Ewen Cameron of Locheil, 'by the accession of others in desperate circumstances, whom the hopes of gain, and the security of living safe from the prosecutions of their defrauded creditors, allured from all parts of the kingdom' and from among such 'needy desparadoes' the Governor had no difficulty recruiting spies. After the Restoration General Mackay built a second fort which he called Fort William, after the King. The village which originally was called Gordonsburgh, having being built on land belonging to the Gordons was renamed Maryburgh, after the King's consort. Destroyed during the 1745 to make defending the Fort easier it was then rebuilt. When the Gordon estates were sold to Sir Duncan Cameron he attempted to change the name to Ducansburgh without success. Local people have always called it simply 'An Gearasdan' meaning The Fort and so it became known as Fort William. In 1884 the War Office finally sold the Fort to Alexander Campbell of Monzie. In 1889 his wife was compelled by Act of Parliament to sell the Fort to make way for the planned West Highland Railway. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2330291&mime_type=&launchZoom=30291 Demonstration, Inverness Printers' section Inverness Printers taking part in a political demonstration outside the Inverness Courier Office. In 1884, the House of Lords blocked Gladstone's Reform Bill which would extend the vote to another two million men. Demonstrations were held and in September around 20,000 workers marched through the streets of Inverness. The banners on the right of the photograph read "Liberal Legislation Working Class" and "Tory Legislation Working Class". The man on the left of the photograph, holding the horse, is James Barron, the Courier's editor. The premises of Fraser and Co., Wholesale Grocers, can be seen next to the Courier Office. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311324&mime_type=&launchZoom=11324 Inverness Field Club aboard 'Glengarry' A short lecture series on the Geology of Scotland was delivered by Professor Young of Glasgow University in November 1875 in the Music Hall, Union Street, Inverness. This was received with such enthusiasm that an expedition, under his leadership, was made to Abriachan to research the geology of that area. Less than a fortnight later discussions were under way with a view to establishing a scientific society and field club to investigate the geology, natural history, botany and archaeology of the surrounding area. The organisation was formally founded on 8 December 1875 in the Waverley Hotel and held its first public meeting in the Town Hall on 11 January 1876. This picture shows Field Club members aboard 'Glengarry' on Loch Ness This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311377&mime_type=&launchZoom=11377 Fortrose & Rosemarkie Golf Course This undated photograph of the golf course was taken from Fortrose. A six hole golf course was opened here in June 1889, and by 1924 had been extended to eighteen holes. The Black Isle Combination Poorhouse and Chanonry Lighthouse can also be seen in the photograph. The Black Isle Combination Poorhouse was built in 1859. Combination Poorhouses were so called because they were funded by a combination (or union) of parishes, in this case Avoch, Cromarty, Killearnan, Knockbain, Resolis, Rosemarkie and Urquhart. The poorhouse became the Ness House Poor Law Institution after 1930, and was scheduled for closure in 1946. Chanonry Lighthouse was engineered by Alan Stevenson and became operational in 1846. The station was automated in 1984. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Groam House Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339101&mime_type=&launchZoom=39101 Old Free East Church, Academy Street, Inverness The Free East Church on Academy Street, was originally built in 1798 as a Chapel of Ease. It became a Free Church at the Disruption of 1843 and was enlarged in 1853 to the designs of Dr. Alexander Ross. In 1897, an octagonal belfry was built onto the church This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311320&mime_type=&launchZoom=11320 North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board Crest After the establishment of the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board in 1943, permission was granted by the Lord Lyon King-at-Arms to display their coat of arms on stationery and buildings. The crest was symbolic of the manner in which natural forces can be used in the service of mankind. The shield carries a winged thunderbolt with flashes of lightning extinguishing the light of an ancient oil burning lamp. The crest represents the power of modern methods (electricity) over the traditional. The fir tree, the water gushing from the rock and the two supporters in the form of stags were all symbols of the Highlands. The motto, Neart nan Gleann means the power of the glens. The crest was used until the name changed to Scottish Hydro-Electric in 1991. The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board was established under the Hydro-Electric Development (Scotland) Act 1943. Thomas Johnston presented the Act in the House of Commons, declaring that by harnessing 'the great latent power of the region' it would assist in remedying the ills that affected the Highlands. Johnston told the Commons that 'industries, whether owned nationally or privately, will be and ought to be, attracted to locations in the Highlands, as a result of this measure'. Ordinary consumers would have priority, then the anticipated large power users, and any surplus energy would be sold to the national grid. Profits from these sales would help reduce distribution costs to more remote areas, and assist in carrying out measures for the economic development and social improvement of the Highlands. This famous social clause gave recognition that the Hydro Board was envisaged as an instrument for the rehabilitation of northern Scotland, not just an organization to provide electricity. The output from the power station at Loch Sloy, west of Loch Lomond, was intended to meet the demand for central and western Scotland. The surplus energy produced here would be used to subsidise the Morar and Lochalsh projects, it being unlikely these smaller schemes could pay their way. The cost of construction of these three projects was estimated at £4,600,000 This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%238368&mime_type=&launchZoom=8368 Family group at Ballachrochin, Drynachan This is a photograph of Peter MacArthur (1823-1907) and family at Ballachrochin, near Drynachan, on the Cawdor moors. They are standing outside a house with a garden surrounded by a picket fence. Among the party are a piper and a ram. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2345622&mime_type=&launchZoom=45622 Culloden Battlefield This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334636&mime_type=&launchZoom=34636 Culloden Battlefield and Cairn This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. It was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334645&mime_type=&launchZoom=34645 Piper at Culloden Moor Battlefield This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. It was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334659&mime_type=&launchZoom=34659 Culloden Battlefield This photograph shows Culloden Battlefield, with the memorial cairn in the background, erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy. The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%23298&mime_type=&launchZoom=298 Culloden Battlefield This photograph, taken in the first half of the 20th century by M.E.M. Donaldson, shows Culloden Battlefield, with the memorial cairn in the background, erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy. The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour. The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the area. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, but was buried in Oban. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%239500&mime_type=&launchZoom=9500 Culloden Battlefield This photograph, taken in the first half of the 20th century by M.E.M. Donaldson, shows Culloden Battlefield, with the memorial cairn in the background, erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy. The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour. The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the area. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, but was buried in Oban. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%239503&mime_type=&launchZoom=9503 Woods at Culloden Battlefield This photograph, taken in the first half of the 20th century by M.E.M. Donaldson, shows the woods at Culloden Battlefield. The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy. The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour. The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the area. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, but was buried in Oban. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%239509&mime_type=&launchZoom=9509 Inverness & Beauly Firth from Culloden Battlefield This photograph, taken in the first half of the 20th century by M.E.M. Donaldson, shows the view over Inverness and the Beauly Firth, from Culloden Battlefield. The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy. The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour. The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the area. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, but was buried in Oban. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%239512&mime_type=&launchZoom=9512 Memorial cairn, Culloden Battlefield The memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy. The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour. The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the area. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, but was buried in Oban. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%239514&mime_type=&launchZoom=9514 Culloden Battlefield, with memorial cairn This photograph, taken in the first half of the 20th century by M.E.M. Donaldson, shows Culloden Battlefield, with the memorial cairn on the right of the picture, erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy. The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour. The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the area. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, but was buried in Oban. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%239524&mime_type=&launchZoom=9524 Four-in-hand carriage passing the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield Four-in-hand carriage passing the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. A four-in-hand is a carriage with four horses, introduced into Britain in the late 19th century and designed in such a way that the driver could hold the reins of all four horses in one hand. Before the invention of the four-in-hand, carriages with four horses had to have two drivers.The plaque which is built into the cairn reads, "THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN WAS FOUGHT ON THIS MOOR 16TH APRIL 1746. THE GRAVES OF THE GALLANT HIGHLANDERS WHO FOUGHT FOR SCOTLAND & PRINCE CHARLIE ARE MARKED BY THE NAMES OF THEIR CLANS." The cairn, standing twenty feet high, was erected in 1881 by Duncan Forbes of Culloden and on the Saturday closest to the 16th April each year, a ceremony takes place beside the cairn, in memory of the fallen. The road which can be seen in the photograph, was constructed in 1835 and cut through areas where the clan graves are situated. The road was realigned between 1984 and 1986 This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311232&mime_type=&launchZoom=11232 Children on the Cumberland Stone, Culloden Moor Children on the Cumberland Stone at the far east of Culloden Battlefield. There are many different accounts relating to this stone. One suggests that the Duke of Cumberland stood on this boulder while directing the battle. However, historians now believe that the Duke was on horseback at the time, but could possibly have surveyed the ground from the stone at an earlier point . Another account suggests that the Duke may have eaten a meal at the stone, after the battle. William Augustus Hanover, Duke of Cumberland, was born in London on the 15th April 1721. He was the brother of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and uncle of George III. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311233&mime_type=&launchZoom=11233 Volunteer Camp at Culloden, June 1871 Volunteer Camp at Culloden in June 1871, possibly Inverness-shire Rifle Volunteers. The Volunteer brigades were first created as Independent companies, whose uniforms were almost entirely dependent on the volunteers themselves. In 1861, regulations were published, giving instructions on issues such as the discipline and training of the volunteers, and the companies were sorted into Administrative Battalions. In 1871, they became subject to the Articles of War and the Mutiny Act, after being transferred to the Secretary of State for War. In 1873, command again changed to the Brigade Depots, and for the first time, they were formally aligned with the Regular Army. After the Army Reforms of 1881, the Volunteer brigades became integral parts of the local regiments. In 1887-1888, they were redesignated as Volunteer Battalions of the parent regiments. The battalions' role was limited to home defence, and they were not compelled to undertake overseas service. The Volunteer Battalions became the Territorial Force under the Haldane reforms of 1908, and their role was changed to operating, if necessary, as a reserve field force in Europe. This plan was implemented in 1914, when the Territorial Force was assigned to serving in France This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311507&mime_type=&launchZoom=11507 Memorial Cairn on Culloden Moor The memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield is approximately 20ft (6m) high and 18ft (5½m) around. It was raised by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 in memory of the Jacobites who had fought at Culloden in 1746. The inscription on the cairn reads: The Battle of Culloden Was fought on this moor 16th April 1746. The Graves of the Gallant Highlanders Who fought for Scotland and Prince Charles Are marked by the names of their clans. This illustration was taken from 'Mackenzie's Guide to Inverness', by Alexander Mackenzie (Inverness, 1893) http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2331330&mime_type=&launchZoom=31330 Views of Culloden Moor This postcard shows scenes from the Culloden area, near Inverness. Culloden Moor was the scene of the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It was fought on 16 April 1746 and saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. Many landmarks associated with the battle can still be seen today. Featured on this card are the memorial cairn erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881; the graves of the clans which fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie; the Cumberland Stone from which the Duke of Cumberland is said to have directed the battle; a cottage on Culloden Moor which survived the battle fought around it; and Culloden House, where Bonnie Prince Charlie spent several nights before the battle. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334602&mime_type=&launchZoom=34602 Views of Culloden Moor This postcard shows scenes from the Culloden area, near Inverness. Culloden Moor was the scene of the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It was fought on 16 April 1746 and saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. Many landmarks associated with the battle can still be seen today. Featured on this card are the memorial cairn erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881; a cottage on Culloden Moor which survived the battle fought around it; the 'Well of the Dead', where the body of Alexander MacGillivray of Dunmaglass, commander of the Clan Chattan regiment, was found; the 'King's Stables', a building reputed to have housed the King's cavalry after the battle; and the Culloden wishing well, where pieces of cloth were hung to bring good luck. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334603&mime_type=&launchZoom=34603 Views of Culloden Moor This postcard shows scenes from Culloden Battlefield near Inverness. Culloden Moor was the scene of the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It was fought on 16 April 1746 and saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. Many landmarks associated with the battle can still be seen today. Featured on this card are the memorial cairn erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881; the graves of the clans which fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie; the Cumberland Stone from which the Duke of Cumberland is said to have directed the battle; the 'King's Stables', a building reputed to have housed the King's cavalry after the battle; the old Leanach cottage which survived the battle fought around it; the Culloden wishing well, where pieces of cloth were hung to bring good luck; and the 'Well of the Dead', where the body of Alexander MacGillivray of Dunmaglass, commander of the Clan Chattan regiment, was found. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334604&mime_type=&launchZoom=34604 King's Stables, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the building known as 'King's Stables' which lies in a depression called Stable Hollow, about a mile west of Culloden Battlefield. It is a ruined thatched cottage, reputed to have housed the King's cavalry after the Battle of Culloden. The inscription on the nearby stone reads: 'Kings Stables Station of English Cavalry after the Battle of Culloden'. The King's Stables was presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It was fought on 16 April 1746 and saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334618&mime_type=&launchZoom=34618 The Cumberland Stone, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the Cumberland Stone, an enormous boulder at the far east of Culloden Battlefield. There are many different accounts relating to this stone. One suggests that the Duke of Cumberland stood on this boulder while directing the battle. However, historians now believe that the Duke was on horseback at the time, but could possibly have surveyed the ground from the stone at an earlier point. Another account suggests that the Duke may have eaten a meal at the stone, after the battle. William Augustus Hanover, Duke of Cumberland, younger brother of George III, was born in 1721 and died at the age of 44 in 1765. He is remembered in particular for the part he played in the Battle of Culloden in 1746. Under his leadership, the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart was defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II, laying to rest all Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334624&mime_type=&launchZoom=34624 Cumberland Stone, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the Cumberland Stone, an enormous boulder at the far east of Culloden Battlefield, with traditional thatched cottages beyond. There are many different accounts relating to this stone. One suggests that the Duke of Cumberland stood on this boulder while directing the battle. However, historians now believe that the Duke was on horseback at the time, but could possibly have surveyed the ground from the stone at an earlier point. Another account suggests that the Duke may have eaten a meal at the stone, after the battle. William Augustus Hanover, Duke of Cumberland, younger brother of George III, was born in 1721 and died at the age of 44 in 1765. He is remembered in particular for the part he played in the Battle of Culloden in 1746. Under his leadership, the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart was defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II, laying to rest all Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334625&mime_type=&launchZoom=34625 Battlefield and Graves, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334627&mime_type=&launchZoom=34627 Graves of the Clans, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334628&mime_type=&launchZoom=34628 Culloden Battlefield This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334630&mime_type=&launchZoom=34630 Graves of the Clans, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334629&mime_type=&launchZoom=34629 Culloden Battlefield, Cairn and Tombstones This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334632&mime_type=&launchZoom=34632 Culloden, the Cairn and Graves of the Clans This postcard belongs to Raphael Tuck's 'Oilette' series and shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334633&mime_type=&launchZoom=34633 Culloden Battlefield This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334634&mime_type=&launchZoom=34634 The Graves of the Clans, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the Graves of the Clans on Culloden Battlefield. Dotted around the battlefield are small memorial stones marking the burial places of the dead of various clans who fought with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1746. There is also a twenty foot memorial cairn which was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881 bearing this inscription: 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The Graves, Memorial Cairn and King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334640&mime_type=&launchZoom=34640 Culloden Moor This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. It was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334650&mime_type=&launchZoom=34650 Culloden Moor Cairn This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. It was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334652&mime_type=&launchZoom=34652 The Memorial Cairn, Culloden Battlefield This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. It was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334654&mime_type=&launchZoom=34654 The Cairn, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. It was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334656&mime_type=&launchZoom=34656 The Cairn, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield. It was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334658&mime_type=&launchZoom=34658 Druid Stones and Remains of Temple, Clava, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the cairns and standing stones at Balnuaran of Clava by the River Nairn. There are three cairns at Clava: two chambered cairns and one ring cairn. These three form part of a line of seven cairns in the valley of the River Nairn and belong to a larger group of about 50 cairns in the inner Moray Firth area. They are each surrounded by a stone circle and called Clava Cairns after the cairns at Clava. The two chambered cairns at Clava are known as passage graves: the inner chamber is linked to the outside world by a passage. Their passageways are aligned on the south west and the midwinter sunset. Each passage grave is surrounded by an outer kerb of larger stones, around which stands a circle of standing stones. The kerb stones and the standing stones are graded in size, becoming larger towards the south west. Cairns, or heaps of stones, were built up around the circular burial chambers. The second type of Clava Cairn is the ring cairn. It has no passageway and would have been open at the top. Like the other cairns, it is surrounded by an outer kerb and a ring of standing stones. The central cairn at Clava is a ring cairn. It was originally thought that the Clava Cairns date from the late-Neolithic period but recent excavation work suggests they may be later, possibly from the Bronze Age. Excavations in 1828, 1857 and the 1950s revealed pieces of pottery and flint and human bones, some of which were cremated. There is evidence to suggest that the site was of great significance and possibly reserved for people of high status. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334661&mime_type=&launchZoom=34661 Druid Stones and Temple, Clava, near Culloden Moor This postcard shows the cairns and standing stones at Balnuaran of Clava by the River Nairn. There are three cairns at Clava: two chambered cairns and one ring cairn. These three form part of a line of seven cairns in the valley of the River Nairn and belong to a larger group of about 50 cairns in the inner Moray Firth area. They are each surrounded by a stone circle and called Clava Cairns after the cairns at Clava. The two chambered cairns at Clava are known as passage graves: the inner chamber is linked to the outside world by a passage. Their passageways are aligned on the south west and the midwinter sunset. Each passage grave is surrounded by an outer kerb of larger stones, around which stands a circle of standing stones. The kerb stones and the standing stones are graded in size, becoming larger towards the south west. Cairns, or heaps of stones, were built up around the circular burial chambers. The second type of Clava Cairn is the ring cairn. It has no passageway and would have been open at the top. Like the other cairns, it is surrounded by an outer kerb and a ring of standing stones. The central cairn at Clava is a ring cairn. It was originally thought that the Clava Cairns date from the late-Neolithic period but recent excavation work suggests they may be later, possibly from the Bronze Age. Excavations in 1828, 1857 and the 1950s revealed pieces of pottery and flint and human bones, some of which were cremated. There is evidence to suggest that the site was of great significance and possibly reserved for people of high status. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334662&mime_type=&launchZoom=34662 The Cairn, Culloden Moor This postcard shows the memorial cairn at Culloden Battlefield, surrounded by a border of Stewart tartan, and with the Inverness coat of arms in the top right corner. The cairn was erected by Duncan Forbes of Culloden in 1881, in memory of the fallen Jacobites. The inscription on the plaque of the 20 feet high cairn reads : 'The Battle of Culloden was fought on this moor 16th April, 1746. The graves of the Gallant Highlanders who fought for Scotland and Prince Charlie are marked by the names of their clans'. The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to 16 April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334668&mime_type=&launchZoom=34668 King's Stables, Culloden Moor Near the battlefield at Culloden is a depresssion called Stable Hollow with a small cottage known as the "King's Stables". The Duke of Cumberland's dragoons were said to have been stationed there after the battle in 1746. The King's Stables were presented to the National Trust for Scotland by Hector Forbes of Culloden in 1944 This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Edinburgh Central Library http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2338714&mime_type=&launchZoom=38714