<link>http://www.ambaile.org.uk/</link> <logo url="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/images/logo.gif"/> <atom:link rel="next" href="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/?language=en&service=search&action=do_quick_search&q=&rss_mode=1&page=2"/> <item> <title>Murdo Macpherson of Sand, Gairloch A photograph of Murdo Macpherson of Sand, near Gairloch. He was a stalker at Strathvaich, a 37,000 acre estate around Garve. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%236302&mime_type=&launchZoom=6302 Murdo Macpherson, 1930s Murdo Macpherson of Sand, Gairloch in the 1930s. He was a gamekeeper and stalker at Strathvaich, a 37,000 acre estate around Garve. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%236328&mime_type=&launchZoom=6328 John Bain, George MacPherson, Murdo Campbell and one other Four sailors in naval uniforms during World War I. Back row, left to right are John Bain of Isle Horrisdale and George Macpherson of Port Henderson. Front row: Murdo Campbell of Leacnasaide and unknown. Each man is wearing a cap with the name HMS Victory. This would have been a shore base rather than a ship. There were at least eight shore bases with this name in the United Kingdom during World War I. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%236320&mime_type=&launchZoom=6320 Kenneth MacRae of South Erradale Kenneth MacRae (Ceinnidh Choinnich Bhuidhe) of South Erradale, later of Redpoint, in his army uniform. World War 1 era. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235167&mime_type=&launchZoom=5167 The wedding of Willie MacRae and Gracie Bryce, 1920s The wedding of Willie MacRae of South Erradale and Gracie Bryce, both seated. Pictured standing, from left to right, are Kitty MacRae, unknown (the Best Man) and Jean Morrison, a cousin from Glasgow. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235164&mime_type=&launchZoom=5164 The Village, Poolewe A view of Poolewe taken from the road at the front of Poolewe Hotel with the Established church on the left and a row of houses on the right. Creag Thollaidh is visible in the centre background. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235017&mime_type=&launchZoom=5017 Loch Maree Hotel A view of the Loch Maree Hotel from the mouth of the Talladale River. The extensive birchwood on the slopes of Torr na h-Iolaire and Sròn a'Choit is clearly visible. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235002&mime_type=&launchZoom=5002 Loch Maree Hotel staff in the early 1900s A photograph of staff at Loch Maree Hotel, taken in the early 1900s. Loch Maree Hotel is famous for having hosted Queen Victoria in 1877 during her tour of the Highlands. The event is credited with beginning a tourist boom in the region. Derived from the Gaelic 'Loch Ma'ruibhe', named after Saint Mael Rubha who founded a chapel on Maree Island in the eighth century, Loch Maree is the fourth largest freshwater loch in Scotland, with a length of 20 km and a maximum width of 4 km. Considered to be one of Scotland's most picturesque lochs, the A832 to the west coast passes along its southern bank. Loch Maree is bordered by Slioch (3218 ft) on the northern bank and Beinn Eighe Nature Reserve to the south. Its location in prime hill-walking country means the region is beset by an annual influx of visitors eager to climb the surrounding peaks. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235500&mime_type=&launchZoom=5500 Queen Victoria's Commemorative Stone, Loch Maree Hotel A photograph of the stone which commemorates Queen Victoria's visit to the Loch Maree Hotel, in 1877. Queen Victoria's visit to the region, during her tour of the Highlands, is credited with beginning a tourist boom in the region. Derived from the Gaelic 'Loch Ma'ruibhe', named after Saint Mael Rubha who founded a chapel on Maree Island in the eighth century, Loch Maree is the fourth largest freshwater loch in Scotland, with a length of 20 km and a maximum width of 4 km. Considered to be one of Scotland's most picturesque lochs, the A832 to the west coast passes along its southern bank. Loch Maree is bordered by Slioch (3218 ft) on the northern bank and Beinn Eighe Nature Reserve to the south. Its location in prime hill-walking country means the region is beset by an annual influx of visitors to climb the surrounding peaks. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235505&mime_type=&launchZoom=5505 Loch Maree Hotel A photograph of Loch Maree Hotel and its car park. Loch Maree Hotel is famous for having hosted Queen Victoria in 1877, during her tour of the Highlands. The event is credited with beginning a tourist boom in the region. Derived from the Gaelic 'Loch Ma'ruibhe,' named after Saint Mael Rubha who founded a chapel on Maree Island in the eighth century, Loch Maree is the fourth largest freshwater loch in Scotland, with a length of 20 km and a maximum width of 4 km. Considered to be one of Scotland's most picturesque lochs, the A832 to the west coast passes along its southern bank. Loch Maree is bordered by Slioch (3218 ft) on the northern bank and Beinn Eighe Nature Reserve to the south. Its location in prime hill-walking country means the region is beset by an annual influx of visitors, eager to climb the surrounding peaks. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235748&mime_type=&launchZoom=5748 Several men preparing to go fishing - house identified as the Loch Maree Hotel Do you recognise this building? If you can help, please contact us This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%236038&mime_type=&launchZoom=6038 Loch Maree Hotel This postcard shows the Loch Maree Hotel in Wester Ross, built in 1872. In 1877, Queen Victoria spent six nights there and enjoyed her visit. She said she hoped to return one day. Loch Maree (background), in Wester Ross, is twelve miles long and extends from Kinlochewe to near Poolewe. Most of the loch is only about half a mile wide. It broadens into about a mile in places and has several small islands. The hotel is about half way along the loch This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%236566&mime_type=&launchZoom=6566 Loch Maree Hotel Loch Maree is situated between the towns of Kinlochewe and Gairloch in Wester Ross. The hotel stands on the shores of the loch. The advertisement boasts that the hotel was 'lately Her Majesty's West Highland Residence'. Queen Victoria stayed in the hotel from 12 - 18 September 1877 and a plaque commemorates her visit. Loch Maree is noted for its sea-trout fishing and the hotel advertisement claims that 20 square miles of free fishing are available. This illustration was taken from 'Mackenzie's Guide to Inverness', by Alexander Mackenzie (Inverness, 1893) http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2331334&mime_type=&launchZoom=31334 Loch Maree Hotel This postcard shows the Loch Maree Hotel in Wester Ross, built in 1872. In 1877, Queen Victoria spent six nights there and enjoyed her visit. She said she hoped to return one day http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332845&mime_type=&launchZoom=32845 Loch Maree Hotel This postcard shows the Loch Maree Hotel in Wester Ross, built in 1872. In 1877, Queen Victoria spent six nights there and enjoyed her visit. She said she hoped to return one day http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332846&mime_type=&launchZoom=32846 Loch Maree Hotel This postcard shows the Loch Maree Hotel in Wester Ross, built in 1872. In 1877, Queen Victoria spent six nights there and enjoyed her visit. She said she hoped to return one day. Loch Maree (foreground), in Wester Ross, is twelve miles long and extends from Kinlochewe to near Poolewe. Most of the loch is only about half a mile wide. It broadens into about a mile in places and has several small islands. The hotel is about half way along the loch http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332847&mime_type=&launchZoom=32847 Loch Maree Hotel This postcard shows the Loch Maree Hotel in Wester Ross, built in 1872. In 1877, Queen Victoria spent six nights there and enjoyed her visit. She said she hoped to return one day http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332848&mime_type=&launchZoom=32848 Loch Maree Hotel This postcard shows the Loch Maree Hotel in Wester Ross, built in 1872. In 1877, Queen Victoria spent six nights there and enjoyed her visit. She said she hoped to return one day. Loch Maree(foreground) in Wester Ross, is twelve miles long and extends from Kinlochewe to near Poolewe. Most of the loch is only about half a mile wide. It broadens into about a mile in places and has several small islands. The hotel is about half way along the loch http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332849&mime_type=&launchZoom=32849 Badachro School pupils 1951 The pupils of Badachro School in 1951. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234998&mime_type=&launchZoom=4998 Gairloch Hotel, Gairloch The view looking north along an untarred road towards the Gairloch Hotel. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234971&mime_type=&launchZoom=4971 Castle Grant Staff This image from the Grantown Museum archives shows a group of staff, photographed on the steps of Castle Grant. On the far right of the middle row is Margaret Morrison (née Fotheringham) Castle Grant, the former seat of the Chiefs of the Clan Grant and the Earls of Seafield, is located 2.3 km northeast of Grantown on Spey. The first recorded mention of a tower here occurs in 1536. The building and surrounding lands at this time were in the ownership of 'Duncan le Gaunte of Fruychy', who had obtained them around 1450. The building was named 'Castle Grant' by Sir Ludovick Grant in 1694, and was expanded at various times over the course of the 17th and early 18th centuries. Castle Grant was significantly remodelled and enlarged in the 1750s by the Scottish architect John Adam, and it was Adam who designed the building's severe north facade. Castle Grant was sold by the Grant family in 1983, and has since remained in private ownership. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Grantown Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2322769&mime_type=&launchZoom=22769 Group at Gairloch Pier, 1957 A group at Gairloch Pier in 1957 when Macbrayne's steamer 'Lochnevis' called on one of her summer evening trips from Portree to Gairloch. From left to right are Roddy Mackenzie, a retired postman from Port Henderson; a girl from Skye; Liza Mackenzie,16 Melvaig; Maggie Robertson, Oakbank, Pier; Kenneth Macrae, a butcher from Melvaig; Irene Macintyre, North Erradale; Edna Maclean, Lonmore; Hannah Mackenzie, Beecholm, Achtercairn; Colin Roy Robertson, Oakbank, Pier; Adda Mackenzie, 16 Melvaig; Elizabeth Urquhart, 26 Melvaig. On the right is Kenneth Macrae's butchers van, a Ford Thames 15cwt, (registration KJS 631). This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%237890&mime_type=&launchZoom=7890 Peter Louden Peter Louden was a crofter at Achterneed and had relations in Ullapool. He was born on 24 July 1880 at Rireabhach (on the north side of Little Loch Broom, near Scoraig). It is thought this photograph was taken at the Strathpeffer games. The cars in the background appear to be of the 1950s era. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Ullapool Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2340209&mime_type=&launchZoom=40209 Sister Alice MacLean, Gairloch A photograph of Sister Alice MacLean of Gairloch. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%237847&mime_type=&launchZoom=7847 Group of six people outside Old Gairloch Post Office A group of six people outside Old Gairloch Post Office, beside the Old Inn. From left to right are Donnie Macdonald, a bus driver from Achnasheen (he was standing in for regular driver that day); John Mackenzie (Sammy), a postman from Leacnasaide; Tommy Macleod, a postman from Mihol; Mrs Mackenzie, sub-postmistress at Gairloch Post Office; Mrs Mackenzie's daughter Leeba; and John Mackenzie (Lofty), a bus and lorry driver from Port Henderson. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%237892&mime_type=&launchZoom=7892 Group of five men in front of a lorry on Gairloch Pier, c1960 A group of five men in front of a lorry on Gairloch Pier about 1960. From left to right are Roddy Macrae, a shoemaker from Brackencroft; Robert Jappy, a fish transport organiser; Peter (Patty) Dingwall who lived at the pier; Bunny (Table) Mackenzie, Strath; Murdo (Mort Long) Mackenzie, Port Henderson. The lorry is a 7-ton Bedford 'S' type with a Bedford 330 Diesel engine and was used mostly for transporting fish to East Coast Ports. It was owned by Ian Bain of North Erradale and driven by Patty Dingwall. The registration number was LVD 832 (registered in 1955). It originally had a petrol engine which was sold to Achnasheen Hotel and used in their hotel bus. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%237893&mime_type=&launchZoom=7893 Achtercairn School, 1937 Auchtercairn School 1937. Back L-R: Ian A. Bain, Lonmore; John MacIntyre; Kenny (Shondan) Mackenzie; Duncan Morrison; Donnie Urquhart, Pier; Hecky (Norman) Mackenzie; Norman Bain, North Erradale; Willie John Maclennan, Port House. Middle: Nan (Shondan) Mackenzie; Angela MacKenzie, Smithton, Strath; Margaret Duff, Flowerdale; Maimie MacKenzie, Seabrook; Leeba Mackenzie, Post Office, Gairloch; Katie Bain, Lonmore; Mary (Sandy) MacLean, Lonmore. Front: Alastair MacIntyre; Osgood (Occo) MacKenzie; Murdo Brown, Lonmore. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%237895&mime_type=&launchZoom=7895 Sanitary Department of the County of Inverness - 8th Report (1898) The report of Inverness County Council's Sanitary Department for the year 1898 http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2346194&mime_type=&launchZoom=46194 Sanitary Department of the County of Inverness - 5th Report (1895) The report of Inverness County Council's Sanitary Department for the year 1895 http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2346195&mime_type=&launchZoom=46195 Sanitary Department of the County of Inverness - 1st Report (1891) The report of Inverness County Council's Sanitary Department for the year 1891 http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2346196&mime_type=&launchZoom=46196 Caithness buildings 3 - identified as the Free Church Manse, Lybster Do you recognise this building? If you can help, please contact us This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Caithness Horizons http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234726&mime_type=&launchZoom=4726 Early photograph of a train waiting to leave Dornoch. This photograph shows the first train waiting to depart from Dornoch for The Mound when the line opened, hauled by a Lochgorm Tank, No. 56 'Dornoch'. The train consists of a mixture of coaches; the third one is an ex-Midland Railway clerestory brake coach. Dornoch was the terminus of a branch line from The Mound, opened as the Dornoch Light Railway on 2 June 1902. It was closed to all traffic on 13 June 1960. Three Lochgorm tanks were built between 1869 and 1874 for shunting. They were designed by William Stroudley and are similar to his much better known Terrier tanks on the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway. They were withdrawn between 1927 and 1932. No. 56 was allocated to working the Dornoch branch, when it opened, and was given the name 'Dornoch'. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2327134&mime_type=&launchZoom=27134 Rigg Salmon Fishing Crew One of the salmon fishing stations run by James Banks was at Rigg, on the east coast of the Trotternish peninsula on Skye. The four man crew are pictured here. They have been identified as, from left to right, John Dewar Nicholson of Ellishadder; unknown; George Macleod of Clachan and Malcolm Macleod of Grealine. Wooden poles are laid over the flat rocks to make it easier to haul the coble up out of the water. The cobles were clinker-built, flat-bottomed and high-bowed boats. Their design made them perfect for the rough seas of the area but also easy to manoeuvre up onto the rocky shorelines. They were stable in the water when hauling nets and anchors and had plenty of space to keep the fish and equipment. At some of the salmon stations, basic accommodation was provided so the crew could stay overnight. A larger boat, usually the ''Nereid'', would come out from Portree carrying supplies and ice. It would collect the freshly caught salmon and take it back to Portree where it would remain until transported off the island. West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd In 1944 James Banks & Sons, Perth bought the sea salmon fishing lease for the Kilmuir Estates, Skye from A Powrie & Co, and formed the West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd to operate the lease. The company continued until 1962 when it was sold to Kenneth Matheson, Portree. When Banks and Sons took over the lease there were fishing stations at Lealt, Rigg (Borreraig), Staffin, Portree, Camustianavaig, Balmeanach and Brochel Castle (on Raasay). In 1956, Balmeanach and Camustianavaig merged to become the Braes station, with three men employed, while the others usually had four-man crews. The company employed about 28 men each year with jobs being offered to the same men each season before new workers were hired. The season began late April/early May and ran through to the end of August. Several men were also employed during the winter months to take ice down from the dam at Sluggans for storage at the ice house at Portree harbour. Each crew member would receive a contract with information on wages, proposed bonus scheme and work hours and were provided with oilskins and rubber boots. The catch was divided into salmon, grilse and trout, with grilse numbers being the highest. The total annual catch was approximately 3000 fish in the late 1940s and early 1950s. A record high of nearly 10,000 fish were caught in 1957. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2313063&mime_type=&launchZoom=13063 Lealt Salmon Fishing Crew, Isle of Skye This photograph shows the Lealt salmon fishing crew alongside the 'Nereid', the boat that took supplies, ice and equipment from Portree to the fishing stations and would return with the freshly caught salmon. The man at the back, wearing the beret, has been identified as George Macleod of Clachan. David Banks, son of James Banks who owned the fishing lease, is kneeling on the 'Nereid' talking to the crew in the smaller boat. It appears that David has just offered the crew a dram. Two of the crew have been identified. The man resting his head in his hands is Angus MacLeod, and on the far right is his brother Donald MacLeod from Culnacnoc. In the distance is Rubha nam Brathairean, or Brother's Point. It is believed that this was the site of a monastic community around 1000 years ago. There are the remains of several hut circles, walls and land cultivation. The point offers stunning views to the north to the Kilt Rock, and east to Isle Rona and the mainland. West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd In 1944 James Banks & Sons, Perth bought the sea salmon fishing lease for the Kilmuir Estates, Skye from A Powrie & Co, and formed the West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd to operate the lease. The company continued until 1962 when it was sold to Kenneth Matheson, Portree. When Banks and Sons took over the lease there were fishing stations at Lealt, Rigg (Borreraig), Staffin, Portree, Camustianavaig, Balmeanach and Brochel Castle (on Raasay). In 1956, Balmeanach and Camustianavaig merged to become the Braes station, with three men employed, while the others usually had four-man crews. The company employed about 28 men each year with jobs being offered to the same men each season before new workers were hired. The season began late April/early May and ran through to the end of August. Several men were also employed during the winter months to take ice down from the dam at Sluggans for storage at the ice house at Portree harbour. Each crew member would receive a contract with information on wages, proposed bonus scheme and work hours and were provided with oilskins and rubber boots. The catch was divided into salmon, grilse and trout, with grilse numbers being the highest. The total annual catch was approximately 3000 fish in the late 1940s and early 1950s. A record high of nearly 10,000 fish were caught in 1957. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2313094&mime_type=&launchZoom=13094 Staffin Salmon Fishing Crew This photograph shows the coble used by one of the Staffin salmon fishing crews. It is alongside a larger boat, probably the 'Nereid'. The man nearest the camera has been identified as Lachlan Gillies of Stenscholl. In the centre of the smaller boat are wooden fish boxes filled with the freshly caught salmon. The 'Nereid' would come out from Portree and on alternate days go to the Staffin or Raasay fishing stations, bringing supplies and ice and return to Portree with the fresh catch. The salmon would be stored in the ice house at Portree pier until it was taken off the island for sale. The smaller boat is an unnamed coble. These cobles, often built locally, were the style of boat used most often for the sea salmon industry. Their flat bottomed, high bow design made them easy to haul up on the shore, yet they were sturdy and safe on the water when hauling nets and anchors. Some of the larger cobles had engines. The propeller was recessed in the hull so that the boat could slip over the nets without snagging them. The cobles were used for the day to day work at the nets and salmon stations while the larger, faster boat travelled between stations. West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd In 1944 James Banks & Sons, Perth bought the sea salmon fishing lease for the Kilmuir Estates, Skye from A Powrie & Co, and formed the West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd to operate the lease. The company continued until 1962 when it was sold to Kenneth Matheson, Portree. When Banks and Sons took over the lease there were fishing stations at Lealt, Rigg (Borreraig), Staffin, Portree, Camustianavaig, Balmeanach and Brochel Castle (on Raasay). In 1956, Balmeanach and Camustianavaig merged to become the Braes station, with three men employed, while the others usually had four-man crews. The company employed about 28 men each year with jobs being offered to the same men each season before new workers were hired. The season began late April/early May and ran through to the end of August. Several men were also employed during the winter months to take ice down from the dam at Sluggans for storage at the ice house at Portree harbour. Each crew member would receive a contract with information on wages, proposed bonus scheme and work hours and were provided with oilskins and rubber boots. The catch was divided into salmon, grilse and trout, with grilse numbers being the highest. The total annual catch was approximately 3000 fish in the late 1940s and early 1950s. A record high of nearly 10,000 fish were caught in 1957. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2313101&mime_type=&launchZoom=13101 Lealt Salmon Fishing Crew, Isle of Skye This photograph shows the crew who looked after the salmon fishing station at Lealt on Skye. They are having a dram to celebrate the end of the fishing season. The salmon fishing provided good employment for the area although only on a seasonal basis. Two of the men have so far been identified - at the back centre has been identified as Angus Stewart of Valtos and second from the right, in side profile, is Angus Macleod of Grealine. The men are sitting on the deck of the 'Nereid', the main boat which was based in Portree and went out to the different salmon stations taking nets, equipment, supplies and ice, and collecting the freshly caught salmon to be stored in the ice house in Portree until it was sold or transported off the island. The 'Nereid' would alternate between the stations in Staffin one day, and Braes and Raasay the next. West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd In 1944 James Banks & Sons, Perth bought the sea salmon fishing lease for the Kilmuir Estates, Skye from A Powrie & Co, and formed the West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd to operate the lease. The company continued until 1962 when it was sold to Kenneth Matheson, Portree. When Banks and Sons took over the lease there were fishing stations at Lealt, Rigg (Borreraig), Staffin, Portree, Camustianavaig, Balmeanach and Brochel Castle (on Raasay). In 1956, Balmeanach and Camustianavaig merged to become the Braes station, with three men employed, while the others usually had four-man crews. The company employed about 28 men each year with jobs being offered to the same men each season before new workers were hired. The season began late April/early May and ran through to the end of August. Several men were also employed during the winter months to take ice down from the dam at Sluggans for storage at the ice house at Portree harbour. Each crew member would receive a contract with information on wages, proposed bonus scheme and work hours and were provided with oilskins and rubber boots. The catch was divided into salmon, grilse and trout, with grilse numbers being the highest. The total annual catch was approximately 3000 fish in the late 1940s and early 1950s. A record high of nearly 10,000 fish were caught in 1957. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2313120&mime_type=&launchZoom=13120 Ruined church/chapel, location unidentified - identified as St. Mary's Church, Dunvegan, Isle of Skye Also known as St. Mary's Church, Duirinish and St Mary's Old Church, Kilmuir Can you help us identify the location of these ruins? If so, please contact us http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2313362&mime_type=&launchZoom=13362 Free Church communion, Gairloch An open air church service at Leabaidh na Bà Bàine, Gairloch. The congregation gathered in this photograph is likely to be from the Free Presbyterian Church in Gairloch. Leabaidh na Bà Bàine ("the bed of the white cow") is a natural, oval depression which can hold up to two thousand people. On the west coast of Scotland, the Free Church traditionally held their communion services in Gaelic, although this is becoming less common. The congregation, seen in the act of communion, were from the Gairloch Free Church. Built in 1881 in the Gothic style, it was designed by Mathews & Laurie. The church is located next to the Gairloch Golf Course and still holds weekly services. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234964&mime_type=&launchZoom=4964 The MacLennan Family of Stirkhill, Inverasdale, c1940 A photograph of the MacLennan Family of Stirkhill, Inverasdale outside their thatched cottage. The picture was taken circa 1940. Inverasdale is the collective name for the settlements of Brae and Midtown on the west side of Loch Ewe. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234977&mime_type=&launchZoom=4977 Badachro from the West, 1950s A view from the west, looking across the village of Badachro. Badachro School is in the extreme left middleground and coils of hay are in the field in front of the present Post Office. Badachro is a remote fishing village located three kilometres south of Gairloch, on the banks of Loch Badachro. An excellent natural anchorage, it was a busy fishing village during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Cod was landed in the village and dried at the nearby curing stations at Eilean Horrisdale and Eilean Tioram. The cod fishing industry has long since declined, but lobsters, crabs and prawns are still landed at the village, bound for markets in the south and in Europe. The village's excellent harbour means that it is also a popular anchorage for yachts. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234980&mime_type=&launchZoom=4980 "A Bit Of" Shieldaig, Lochcarron A photograph entitled 'A Bit Of Shieldaig, Lochcarron'. The photograph is numbered 352 in the 'Urquhart Dingwall Series'. Three cottages (two thatched) are visible on the fore-shore, with a larger building above. The wall of the preaching ground can be seen above the left-hand cottage. The village of Shieldaig, located on the south-eastern extent of Loch Gairloch, on the west coast of the Highlands, was founded at the turn of the eighteenth century. It was initially founded to provide a training ground for seaman to crew against the French during the Napoleonic Wars. However, after Napoleon's defeat and exile, the village settled into a small fishing community, which it has remained until the present day. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234982&mime_type=&launchZoom=4982 Inverasdale FC, 1948 This photograph of the players of Inverasdale Football Club was taken on Saturday 17 April 1948 prior to their match against Gairloch which they won 5-2. Back row, left to right (nicknames in brackets): Simon MacIver ("Nazer"); Alex John MacLeod ("Bodach Ruaidh"); Duncan MacLean ("Thom"); Jackie MacLean ("Diver"); Iain Cameron ("The Bard"); unknown; Jack Urquhart ("Jake"). Front row, left to right: John Duncan MacIver ("Dolan"); Roddy MacLeod ("Botlan"); Norman MacIver ("The Tailor"); Kenneth Urquhart ("Cordie"); Eric Dalton. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234985&mime_type=&launchZoom=4985 Badachro Bay and Aird A view of the excellent anchorage at Badachro Bay. Aird Farm House is on the left and Dry Island is on the right. The field on the extreme left is in hay coils or oat stooks, the curving line of the old "caraidh" (fish trap) is visible in the water at the extreme left; and lines of old "feannagan" (lazy beds) are be faintly visible in the right foreground where the sheep are grazing. Badachro is a remote fishing village located three kilometres south of Gairloch, on the banks of Loch Badachro. An excellent natural anchorage, it was a busy fishing village during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Cod was landed in the village and dried at the nearby curing stations at Eilean Horrisdale and Eilean Tioram. The cod fishing industry has long since declined, but lobsters, crabs and prawns are still landed at the village, bound for markets in the south and in Europe. The village's excellent harbour means that it is also a popular anchorage for yachts. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234988&mime_type=&launchZoom=4988 Inverasdale Entitled 'Post Office, Inverasdale', this photograph contains a view of the small fishing village of Inverasdale. A family group is visible in the foreground, embarking on a guided fishing trip in a small rowing boat. In the background the building on the right was the original school and church meeting house, with the teacher or missionary living upstairs. Inverasdale is the collective term for a series of small crofting villages located on the B8057 north along the western shore of Loch Ewe. Beyond the community of Cove, almost towards the terminus of the B8057, 'Rubha nan Sasan' functioned as an important assembly point for the Arctic Convoy during the Second World War. The commitment and sacrifice of those who set sail from Loch Ewe, is commemorated by a memorial stone, which was unveiled at Cove in 1999. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%234992&mime_type=&launchZoom=4992 Craig Roy, Loch Maree This photograph is entitled "Craig Roy, Loch Maree". It shows the view across Tagan farm buildings to Allt na Still, Steall a'Mhùinidh, and a'Bhonaid Dhonn (Craig Ruadh is further to the south-east, according to the map). This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235000&mime_type=&launchZoom=5000 Ardlair House A view of Ardlair House, near Loch Maree, with the crags of Beinn Aìridh Charr behind. Located in the former parish of Golspie, Ardlair House was built to a design by John Hinton Gall, an Edinburgh-born architect, who also worked on Ness Castle in Inverness, and the Sheriff's Courthouse in Fort William. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235028&mime_type=&launchZoom=5028 Shieldaig House, Gairloch A view looking south across Loch Gairloch to Shieldaig House. This Victorian lodge is located in the village of Shieldaig, on the southern banks of Loch Gairloch, and is surrounded by 26,000 acres of privately owned land. Shieldaig Highland Lodge, as it is known today, offers comfortable accommodation amongst remote surroundings, and is particularly popular with the hunting set. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235030&mime_type=&launchZoom=5030 The Harbour, Badachro, Gairloch A view looking out from the harbour at Badachro to Loch Badachro, and Loch Gairloch beyond. Two large boats are drawn up on the shore, one with the registration number 124 UL. Badachro is a remote fishing village located three kilometres south of Gairloch, on the banks of Loch Badachro. An excellent natural anchorage, it was a busy fishing village during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Cod was landed in the village and dried at the nearby curing stations at Eilean Horrisdale and Eilean Tioram. The cod fishing industry has long since declined, but lobsters, crabs and prawns are still landed at the village, bound for markets in the south and in Europe. The village's excellent harbour means that it is also a popular anchorage for yachts. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235050&mime_type=&launchZoom=5050 At the Smithy, Gairloch A photograph entitled 'At The Smithy, Strath, Gairloch'. The blacksmith shoeing the horse is Ruairidh 'Ghobha, brother of Ceinnidh 'Ghobha. The smiddy was in Strath Square. A small fishing and crofting community on the north-west coast of the Highlands, Gairloch derives its name from the Gaelic for 'short loch' and is located on Flowerdale Bay, a sheltered inlet which has been in the past, and still remains, an important anchorage on the west coastline for fishing boats and yachts. The Gairloch community once consisted of a number of small scattered settlements. Prior to the completion of the A832 in 1843, access to the area was almost exclusively by sea. Once 'opened up', the Gairloch area became a popular destination for Victorian tourists wishing to sample the Highland 'sublime'. The area experienced a boom following a royal visit by Queen Victoria in 1877, who visited during her stay at nearby Loch Maree Hotel. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235056&mime_type=&launchZoom=5056 Strath, Gairloch A view of the small village of Strath, which is part of the Gairloch crofting community. The former Auchtercairn School building can be seen in the middle distance. In the foreground small boats are drawn up on the shore, nets are drying on posts and beyond them is the salmon fishing bothy. A small fishing and crofting community on the north-west coast of the Highlands, Gairloch derives its name from the Gaelic for 'short loch' and is located on Flowerdale Bay, a sheltered inlet which has been in the past, and still remains, an important anchorage on the west coastline for fishing boats and yachts. The Gairloch community once consisted of a number of small scattered settlements. Prior to the completion of the A832 in 1843, access to the area was almost exclusively by sea. Once 'opened up', the Gairloch area became a popular destination for Victorian tourists wishing to sample the Highland 'sublime'. The area experienced a boom following a royal visit by Queen Victoria in 1877, who visited during her stay at nearby Loch Maree Hotel. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235078&mime_type=&launchZoom=5078