<link>http://www.ambaile.org.uk/</link> <logo url="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/images/logo.gif"/> <atom:link rel="next" href="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/?language=en&service=search&action=do_quick_search&q=&rss_mode=1&page=2"/> <item> <title>unidentified garage (possibly the old Sutherland Arms garage in Golspie) Do you recognise the garage in this photograph, or its location? If you can help, please contact us http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2313782&mime_type=&launchZoom=13782 Isleornsay Pier, Skye Isleornsay is named after the small tidal island which lies between the village and the Sound of Sleat. The village is also known by its Gaelic name Eilean Iarmain and was founded in the early 19th century on the sheltered bay overlooking the island, which provided a protected harbour for fishing vessels.The village became a commercial centre for the area under the auspices of the Macdonalds, the local land owners. The quay was constructed in 1805 with other buildings close by including a general store, stables, a grain store and later an inn, now Eilean Iarmain Hotel. Most of the buildings were bought by Sir Iain Noble in 1972, and were then restored or converted, forming the hub of his aims to revitalise the Gaelic language and culture. The building on the right is now an art gallery, An Talla Dearg, offering exhibition space for artists. Central in the photograph is the photographer's distinctive Renault 8S car in Belgian Racing Yellow. Mr and Mrs James purchased the car in 1968 and were keen attendees of Renault car rallies, where the car became well known amongst enthusiasts. The car was presented to the Glasgow Transport Museum in 1990 and is on display in the city's new Riverside Museum which houses the Transport Museum exhibits. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339524&mime_type=&launchZoom=39524 HR 12 'Belladrum' A photograph of HR No. 12 'Belladrum'. This locomotive was built for the Inverness & Ross-shire Railway by Hawthorns of Leith in May 1862 and had a 2-2-2 wheel arrangement. It was transferred to the newly-formed Highland Railway in 1865. The HR had it rebuilt in September 1871 as a 2-2-2 tank engine and renamed 'Breadalbane'. A further refit in 1885 saw it renamed 'Strathpeffer' prior to working the Strathpeffer branch line. It continued in use until September 1898. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2324537&mime_type=&launchZoom=24537 HR 13 'Strathpeffer' In 1890, to replace the ageing Belladrum class 2-2-2 tank engine 'Strathpeffer' (HR 12), the Highland Railway built a new saddle tank engine at their Lochgorm works in Inverness. It also had a 2-2-2 wheel configuration and was also named 'Strathpeffer'. It was originally numbered 13 but was renumbered 53 in September 1899. It was rebuilt with a new boiler and side tanks in 1901 and renamed 'Lybster' in May 1903 when it was transferred to work on the newly completed Wick to Lybster Railway. It was renumbered again in 1919, this time to 53A, passed into LMS ownership as 15050. It was withdrawn from service in December 1929. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2324790&mime_type=&launchZoom=24790 HR 25 'Strathpeffer' on train In 1905/06 the Highland Railway built four 0-4-4 tank engines to work on its various small branch lines. Numbered 25, 40, 45 and 46, they were the last locomotives to be built at the company's Lochgorm works in Inverness. Two of the class survived well into the days of British Railways. This photograph shows HR 25 'Strathpeffer' on train. It was the third of the company's locomotives to bear that name. Numbered 15051 by the LMS and continued in service well into British Rail days, eventually being withdrawn in August 1956. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2325824&mime_type=&launchZoom=25824 Two trains at north end of Dingwall station This photograph shows two trains at the north end of Dingwall station. On the left, No. 7 'Ben Attow' is heading a train from Inverness which will continue north on the line to Wick. The connecting train to Strathpeffer stands on the right, headed by a Passenger Tank. The line from Inverness to Dingwall was opened on 11 June 1862. Services were extended northwards to Invergordon on 23 March 1863. On 9 August 1870, the station became a junction when the line to Strome Ferry was opened. The station remains open for passenger services, but goods services ceased in August 1983. The Small Ben class was introduced in 1898 to replace older locomotives on the lighter express duties on the lines north and east of Inverness. They could eventually been seen throughout the Highland railway system. Withdrawal took place mainly in the 1930s and 1940s, but some survived into the 1950s. The Passenger Tank class consisted of four 0-4-4 tanks built in 1905-06 for branch line duties. Two of the class survived until the mid-1950s working on the Dornoch branch, the last Highland Railway locomotives in service. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2327086&mime_type=&launchZoom=27086 Strathpeffer branch train at Dingwall This photograph shows the 7.25 am train to Strathpeffer about to leave Dingwall. The main platform is on the left. The locomotive is Passenger Tank No. 15051. The line from Inverness to Dingwall was opened on 11 June 1862. Services were extended northwards to Invergordon on 23 March 1863. On 9 August 1870, the station became a junction when the line to Strome Ferry was opened. The station remains open for passenger services, but goods services ceased in August 1983. The Passenger Tank class consisted of four 0-4-4 tanks built in 1905-06 for branch line duties. Two of the class survived until the mid-1950s working on the Dornoch branch, the last Highland Railway locomotives in service. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2327094&mime_type=&launchZoom=27094 HR 25 arriving at Strathpeffer This photograph shows HR 25 arriving at Strathpeffer. In 1905/06 the Highland Railway built four 0-4-4 tank engines to work on its various small branch lines. Numbered 25, 40, 45 and 46, they were the last locomotives to be built at the company's Lochgorm works in Inverness. HR 25 'Strathpeffer' was the third of the company's locomotives to bear that name. Numbered 15051 by the LMS and continued in service well into British Rail days, eventually being withdrawn in August 1956. In 1885 the Highland Railway opened a branch line connecting its route between Inverness and Strome Ferry with the spa town of Strathpeffer, a popular resort in the Victorian era. The line closed to passenger services in February 1946 and to goods traffic in August 1951. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2327906&mime_type=&launchZoom=27906 LMS 15014 on a mixed train at Strathpeffer This photograph shows LMS 15014 on a mixed train at Strathpeffer. In 1892 the Highland Railway took delivery of two 4-4-0 tank engines which had been built for the Uruguay Great Eastern Railway but never delivered. After a trial period they purchased the two locomotives which became HR 101 & 102. After the grouping, 102 became LMS 15014 and was eventually withdrawn in December 1934. In 1885 the Highland Railway opened a branch line connecting its route between Inverness and Strome Ferry with the spa town of Strathpeffer, a popular resort in the Victorian era. The line closed to passenger services in February 1946 and to goods traffic in August 1951. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2327907&mime_type=&launchZoom=27907 HR 129 'Loch Maree' on train near Inverness HR 129 'Loch Maree' on train near Inverness. The service is the Strathpeffer Spa and the locomotive is carrying a headboard stating this. HR 129 was a member of the Highland Railway's 'Loch' class of 4-4-0 locomotive. It was built by Dübs & Co. in Glasgow in 1896. After the grouping it became LMS 14389 and continued in service until being withdrawn in February 1931. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2328079&mime_type=&launchZoom=28079 LMS 16118 'Dornoch' on train at Dingwall, July 1926 LMS 16118 'Dornoch' on train in the bay at Dingwall in July 1926. The service is the 2.20pm to Strathpeffer. 16118 (formerly HR 56) was one of three 0-6-0 saddletanks built at the Highland Railway's own Lochgorm works in Inverness. Collectively, these locomotives are often referred to as 'Lochgorm Tanks'. 16118 was built in April 1869 and rebuilt in 1896. Originally named 'Balnain', it was renamed 'Dornoch' in 1902 when it became the locomotive to work on the Dornoch Light Railway. In the last years of its life it underwent several changes of number: to 56A in July 1919, back to 56 in September 1919, to 56A again in July 1921 and 56B in May 1922. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2328173&mime_type=&launchZoom=28173 LMS 17260 on a goods train at Strathpeffer, June 1947 LMS 17260 on a goods train at Strathpeffer in June 1947. The service originated in Dingwall. 17260 was an ex-Caledonian Railway '294' Class locomotive. Designed by Dugald Drummond, a total of 163 of these 0-6-0s were built between 1883 and 1895. They were classed 'U' by the LMS. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2328617&mime_type=&launchZoom=28617 The Pumproom, Strathpeffer Spa This postcard shows the Pump Room in the village of Strathpeffer. A large arcaded glass portico runs round the stone building with its two towers, one pinnacled, the other square and with a clock. There are a number of horse-drawn carriages in the road. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. It owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. A Dr Morrison from Aberdeenshire publicised the healing powers of the waters at the beginning of the 19th century and, on his recommendation, the first wooden pump room was built in 1819. It stood in the village square to allow visitors to partake of the waters in various ways. Originally there were a few jugs available for drinking, and basic copper baths. In 1861 a strong stone pump room replaced the original wooden building; new bath-rooms were added in 1871 and ten years later the 'Ladies' Baths' were erected. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, Strathpeffer developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885. Many grand hotels and substantial Victorian villas were built to accommodate the steady stream of visitors who came to 'take the waters'. These improved facilities meant that Strathpeffer could compete with other spa towns in Britain and Europe. Until World War I the village was a major visitor attraction but thereafter its popularity declined. The main Pump Room was demolished in the 1950s but the Upper Pump Room, next to the Pavilion, still remains. It now houses a range of interpretive displays which reveal the history behind the development of the Spa and visitors can again sample the healing waters. Strathpeffer is once more popular with tourists, its large Victorian hotels and guesthouses providing accommodation for visitors touring the Highlands. Among the village's other attractions are a scenic golf course, the Museum of Childhood and the Strathpeffer Spa Pavilion. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2333138&mime_type=&launchZoom=33138 The Highland Hotel, Strathpeffer This postcard shows the Highland Hotel, Strathpeffer. It was built by the Highland Railway Company to its standard design in 1911 and overlooked the main Pump Room in the centre of the village. The towers of the Pump Room are partially obscured by a tree on the right of the picture. The Strathpeffer Pavilion lies across the road on the left. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. It owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. A Dr Morrison from Aberdeenshire publicised the healing powers of the waters at the beginning of the 19th century and, on his recommendation, the first wooden pump room was built in 1819. In 1861 a strong stone pump room replaced the original wooden building. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, Strathpeffer developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885. Many grand hotels and substantial Victorian villas were built to accommodate the steady stream of visitors who came to 'take the waters'. These improved facilities meant that Strathpeffer could compete with other spa towns in Britain and Europe. Until World War I the village was a major visitor attraction but thereafter its popularity declined. The main Pump Room was demolished in the 1950s but the Upper Pump Room, next to the Pavilion, still remains. It now houses a range of interpretive displays which reveal the history behind the development of the Spa and visitors can again sample the healing waters. Strathpeffer is once more popular with tourists, its large Victorian hotels and guesthouses providing accommodation for visitors touring the Highlands. Among the village's other attractions are a scenic golf course, the Museum of Childhood and the Strathpeffer Spa Pavilion. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2333145&mime_type=&launchZoom=33145 Strathpeffer and railway line This postcard, posted in 1906, shows the railway line approaching the village of Strathpeffer from the Dingwall direction. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. It owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort. As the spa facilities of Strathpeffer became better known, the need for improved transport links became apparent. In 1863 a proposal was made to build a railway line from Dingwall to Kyle of Lochalsh via Strathpeffer but local landowners objected to the proposed route. The original line was diverted about two miles north of Strathpeffer, but this proved increasingly inconvenient. Finally, permission was given for a centrally located station and the new branch line to Strathpeffer pictured here was opened in 1885. When the new line opened, the old station was renamed Auchterneed. The opening of the new branch line further enhanced the popularity of the village. Many grand hotels and substantial Victorian villas were built to accommodate the steady stream of visitors who came to 'take the waters'. The railway station was very busy during the summer months and in 1911 the Highland Railway Company built its own hotel, the Highland Hotel. At Aviemore the weekly 'Strathpeffer Spa Express' connected with trains from the south and ran directly to the Spa, stopping only at Dingwall. The outbreak of World War I marked the beginning of the end for the Spa and its railway line. The 'Strathpeffer Spa Express' stopped after the 1915 season and the Highland Hotel was requisitioned by the military. Strathpeffer never regained its pre-war glory. On 23 February 1946 Strathpeffer Station closed to passengers and on 26 March 1951 it closed completely. However, the station buildings were left standing and in 1980 they were restored and now house the Highland Museum of Childhood and associated shops. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2333164&mime_type=&launchZoom=33164 Lord Lovat's Funeral, 1933 This short film extract is from 'Funeral of the Late Major General Lord Lovat', a silent black and white film attributed to James S. Nairn. The full version is approx. 2 mins long and contains further footage of the funeral of Simon Joseph Fraser, 14th Lord Lovat. Footage supplied by Scottish Screen Archive at National Library of Scotland © NLS. Jimmy Nairn (1900-1982) is perhaps best remembered in Inverness as manager of the Playhouse cinema from 1941 to 1972. He began his working life in 1915 as a part-time projectionist at a cinema in Pollokshields, Glasgow. His first managerial appointment was to the Savoy Cinema, Edinburgh in 1925, followed by the Regal, Stirling in 1934 and the Playhouse, Inverness in 1941 where he remained until his retirement in 1972. Cinematography was also his hobby and, in 1931, he claimed to be the first amateur filmmaker to produce a 'talkie' (a film with spoken dialogue). A decade later he was commissioned to make a film of George VI and the Duchess of York at Balmoral Castle. He also advised Disney on a film about the Loch Ness Monster. In addition to producing over 40 films on local topics, many of which were used by the Scottish Tourist Board and the Caledonian Society, he had a photography business and took many thousands of photographs in and around the Inverness area, particularly in the 1950s and 1960s. His collection of negatives, glass plates and prints is in the care of the Highland Photographic Archive. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2341464&mime_type=&launchZoom=41464 Repairing fishing net, Skye Fishing nets require constant maintenance, no matter in which part of the world the fishermen live or what type of fishing they are involved in. Here at the quay at Isleornsay on Skye's east coast, poor weather has kept the fishing boat tied up, but the nets can be checked and repaired, or in this case new, bright orange net attached to the old . Nets were made by hand by knotting twine to create a mesh. The introduction of net making machines speeded up the process and the use of synthetic fibres in the 1950s greatly improved the strength and longevity of the nets. Despite this, modern nets can still be damaged by snagging on rocks or the seabed, or tangling in weed or equipment, and have to be mended by hand. The village of Isleornsay, also known by its Gaelic name Eilean Iarmain, is situated on a sheltered harbour off the Sound of Sleat, protected by the island of the same name. It was founded in the early 19th century on a sheltered bay overlooking the island which provided a protected harbour for fishing vessels. The village became a commercial centre for the area under the auspices of the Macdonalds, the local land owners. The quay was constructed in 1805 with other buildings close by including a general store, stables, a grain store and later an inn, now Eilean Iarmain Hotel. Most of the buildings were bought by Sir Iain Noble in 1972, and were then restored or converted, forming the hub of his aims to revitalise the Gaelic language and culture. The bay is a haven for visiting yachts which now outnumber the fishing boats. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339523&mime_type=&launchZoom=39523 Ullapool Shore Street and the pier at Ullapool are pictured here on a calm summer's day, with Beinn a' Ghobhlach in the background overlooking the entrance to Loch Broom. Ullapool (Ullapul or Ulapul in Gaelic) is situated on the eastern shore of Loch Broom, a large sea loch on the north west coast of Scotland. It is a small picturesque town of around 1,300 inhabitants but despite its small size, it is the largest settlement in the area. Huge numbers of visitors are attracted by the surrounding stunning scenery of lochs, coastline and mountains, as well as to use the daily ferry service to the Outer Isles. Ullapool was designed as a herring port by Thomas Telford in 1788 for the British Fisheries Society, to take advantage of the herring shoals in the area, and indeed the village expanded throughout the early 19th century. When the herring deserted Loch Broom, Ullapool was deprived of its main industry and was brought close to collapse, only its harbour ensuring its survival. The harbour has been used by East coast trawlers fishing the Minch and the factory ships of Eastern Europe, while the car ferry from Stornoway on Lewis and improved road links to Inverness bring a steady influx of visitors. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339545&mime_type=&launchZoom=39545 MV Pioneer approaching Armadale, Skye The ferry from Mallaig approaches Armadale on the south east coast of Skye. MV Pioneer saw seasonal service for Caledonian MacBrayne crossing the Sound of Sleat on the Mallaig - Armadale route from 1979 until 1989, and acted as a relief vessel in the winter months. MV Pioneer was built in 1974 and was in service for 29 years, covering almost all of Caledonian MacBrayne's routes at some point. Vehicles were loaded and unloaded at the stern and side, and a large vehicle hoist and ramps had to be fitted when she was moved from the Islay route to Skye in 1979. Other changes included alterations to the bridge deck and wings so that the ship could load and unload more easily at Mallaig which has a higher tidal range than in Islay. Steamers were once the main method of transport on the west coast of Scotland and when the railway opened at Mallaig in 1901 it became not only a thriving harbour for fleets fishing in the rich waters of the Minch but also a busy port of call for steamers with an increasingly interested tourist trade. The first public jetty was built at Armadale in 1872, but it was unsuitable for steamers as it did not reach deep water. Mail, passengers and freight were brought ashore by rowing boat until the first deep water pier was built in 1914. It was intended as a temporary structure but was still in use 30 years later. The pier was extended in 1945 and as at Mallaig, made suitable for roll-on/roll-off ferries in 1994 with a linkspan facility. This increased the frequency of sailings between the two ports, and the route remains a popular one with tourists as well as Skye residents travelling to the south. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339544&mime_type=&launchZoom=39544 Ruins of Armadale Castle, Skye A glimpse of sunshine lights up the picturesque gardens which have been created in part of the ruins of Armadale Castle in south Skye. This section of Armadale Castle was designed by James Gillespie Graham in 1815, featuring battlements and turrets befitting a Clan Chief, with lavish public rooms and a grand staircase. The Macdonald family left the castle in 1925 to move to a smaller house nearby and the building gradually deteriorated, reduced to a 'sculptured ruin' in 1981, but retaining the staircase and facade. The Macdonald Estate was purchased by the Clan Donald Lands Trust in 1971, founded and supported by Clan Donald members worldwide. The Trust promotes the culture and history of Clan Donald and of the Lordship of the Isles, with a Museum of the Isles incorporating a Study Centre and Library which opened in 2002. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339543&mime_type=&launchZoom=39543 Armadale Castle, Skye In the late 1790s, the first Lord Macdonald had a mansion house built at Armadale on the Sleat Peninsula in Skye. It was greatly extended by architect James Gillespie Graham in 1815 to form Armadale Castle, boasting grand public rooms, vaulted ceilings with intricate mouldings and a fine staircase with a stained glass window of Somerled, progenitor of the clan. The castle was set in landscaped grounds with a walled garden and fine driveway, within the extensive Macdonald estate. A fire in 1855 destroyed most of the original building, but it was partially replaced a year later by the rather dreary central block which exists today, to a design by David Bryce. The Macdonald family eventually left the castle to move to a smaller house nearby. The castle remained the seat of the Macdonalds of Sleat until it was purchased by the Clan Donald Lands Trust in 1971 and for safety reasons, the building was dismantled in 1980, creating a sculptured ruin. A beautiful garden continues to attract visitors, along with the Museum of the Isles and Study Centre constructed in 2002, which houses artefacts and a Library relating to Clan Donald and the Lordship of the Isles. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339542&mime_type=&launchZoom=39542 Former Stables, Armadale Castle, Skye The stable block at the Clan Donald Centre in south Skye dates from the early 1820s. It comprises a central crenellated tower housing a staircase, with coach houses at each end of the block and stables in between. The original design was probably by James Gillespie Graham, as a Gothic 'eyecatcher' for Armadale Castle. In 1984 the Stables were converted into a Visitor Centre and the building now houses a restaurant and shop. Clan Donald has had a presence on the island of Skye since the 15th century, and in Armadale since the 1650s. The Estate includes a mansion house dating from the 1790s, enlarged and remodelled over the years to create an imposing castle set in landscaped grounds with a walled garden and fine driveway. The Macdonald family left the castle in 1925 to move to a smaller house nearby and the building gradually deteriorated to the stabilised ruin that remains today. The Macdonald Estate was purchased by the Clan Donald Lands Trust in 1971, founded and supported by Clan Donald members worldwide. The Trust promotes the culture and history of Clan Donald and the Lordship of the Isles, with a Museum of the Isles incorporating a Study Centre and Library which opened in 2002. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339541&mime_type=&launchZoom=39541 Information Panel, Armadale Castle, Skye This information panel, in English and Gaelic, was situated at the Clan Donald Centre at Armadale in the south of Skye, highlighting the main topographical features which can be seen across the Sound of Sleat. The views are invariably stunning from this location. Clan Donald has had a presence on the island of Skye since the 15th century, and in Armadale since the 1650s. The Estate includes a mansion house dating from the 1790s, later enlarged to create an imposing castle set in landscaped grounds with a walled garden and fine driveway. The Macdonald family left the castle in 1925 to move to a smaller house nearby and the building gradually deteriorated to the stabilised ruin that remains today. The Macdonald Estate was purchased by the Clan Donald Lands Trust in 1971, founded and supported by Clan Donald members worldwide. The Trust promotes the culture and history of Clan Donald and of the Lordship of the Isles, particularly at the Museum of the Isles which incorporates a Study Centre and Library. The Museum was built within the restored gardens of the castle and opened in 2002. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339540&mime_type=&launchZoom=39540 Sheep Pen, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Skye Several Blackface tups are held securely by their owners as a judge assesses them. The event was probably part of an Open Day, held in the courtyard of the Gaelic College in south Skye, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig was founded in 1973 in old farm steadings at Ostaig in Sleat on Skye, originally part of Macdonald estates. While the initial aim was to establish a Gaelic library, the long term plan was for a Gaelic-medium college providing vocational further education for Gaelic speakers, in their own language and in a rural environment, while also giving the growing number of Gaelic enthusiasts the opportunity to learn the language. Summer schools, evening classes and Gaelic based social events gradually expanded so that the college is now part of the University of the Highlands and Islands, offering full degree courses through the medium of Gaelic. As well as the language and culture itself, the college also offers courses in media studies, Gaelic broadcasting, Information Technology and business studies, now in a purpose-built campus, Àrainn Chaluim Chille, with full state-of-the-art facilities. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339539&mime_type=&launchZoom=39539 Scottish Country Dancers, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Skye A demonstration of Scottish Country dancing keeps the public entertained, possibly at an open day at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, the Gaelic College in south Skye. Those taking part are Rae MacColl, Allan and Margaret Humphreys, Stan and Janet Donaldson, Ann Prior, Sheila Mackenzie and Joan MacCorquadale. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig was founded in 1973 in old farm steadings at Ostaig in Sleat on Skye, originally part of Macdonald estates. While the initial aim was to establish a Gaelic library, the long term plan was for a Gaelic-medium college providing vocational further education for Gaelic speakers, in their own language and in a rural environment, while also giving the growing number of Gaelic enthusiasts the opportunity to learn the language. Summer schools, evening classes and Gaelic based social events gradually expanded so that the college is now part of the University of the Highlands and Islands, offering full degree courses through the medium of Gaelic. As well as the language and culture itself, the college also offers courses in media studies, Gaelic broadcasting, Information Technology and business studies, now in a purpose-built campus, Àrainn Chaluim Chille, with full state-of-the-art facilities. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339538&mime_type=&launchZoom=39538 Caisteal Maol The ruins of Caisteal Maol (also Castle Moil or Moyle) at Kyleakin are situated on a rocky outcrop in a strategically commanding position overlooking the strait between Skye and the mainland. The castle, once the home of the Mackinnons of Strathaird, probably dates from the late 15th century although tradition relates that in the 10th century a Norwegian princess known as 'Saucy Mary' married a Mackinnon chief and held the castle and exacted tolls from passing vessels. The castle was originally known as Dunakin, named after King Haakon of Norway (as is the nearby village of Kyleakin), suggesting that an earlier fort may have stood on the site. In 1263, Haakon's fleet sailed through the strait to defend the lands under Scandinavian rule but was met with defeat at Largs. The name Dunakin seems to have survived at least until the late 16th century and the Mackinnons abandoned their residence for more comfortable surroundings elsewhere on Skye soon after. It was a small but substantial rectangular tower of perhaps three or four storeys with the only entrance through a door on the first floor. The castle assumed its present name, meaning "bare", after it had been deserted and begun to collapse. Neglect and the elements have taken their toll, however, and only part of one wall remains. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339446&mime_type=&launchZoom=39446 Kyleakin Harbour Some fishing boats are seen here tied up at the quayside in Kyleakin, on the Isle of Skye. Kyle of Lochalsh can be seen in the background across the straits which have both separated and linked the two communities by means of the ferry which crossed this stretch of water for centuries. The railway pier can just be seen on the far side. Steamers on the west coast route from Glasgow to Stornoway docked here with freight, mail and passengers. Some of these were then ferried across to Kyleakin. The jetty here was extended to cope with the vehicle traffic on the increasingly larger ferries. Kyleakin is a picturesque village with its ruined castle, harbour and long shoreline. It was a popular destination for day trippers who took the ferry from Kyle of Lochalsh and could say they had been "over the sea to Skye" but when the Skye Bridge was opened in 1995, the village was effectively by-passed and lost a lot of passing trade. However, the harbour and jetty have been upgraded and the community has worked hard at creating a welcoming spot for tourists. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339447&mime_type=&launchZoom=39447 A Fishing Boat at Kyleakin harbour A rather neglected boat, The Golden Rule II, is seen here berthed at Kyleakin quayside on Skye. Registered in Kirkwall as K856, she was a seiner or seine netter (a fishing boat which deployed a net weighted at the base and with floats along the top edge). In the background, lines of fishing boats are moored alongside each other at the old pier, out of the way of the ferries crossing between the Kyleakin jetty on the extreme left, and Kyle of Lochalsh on the mainland. Few boats are now based at Kyleakin but a recently installed pontoon provides an easier anchorage than that pictured. The name Kyleakin is derived from the Gaelic 'Caol Acain', meaning 'Haakon's Kyle', a reference to King Haakon IV of Norway who assembled a fleet of ships in Loch Alsh prior to engaging with Alexander III of Scotland at the Battle of Largs in 1263. The ruins overlooking the harbour also have a Norwegian link. Tradition has it that there was a much earlier fort on the site, associated with the fourth MacKinnon chief, Findanus, and his Norwegian wife, a princess nicknamed 'Saucy Mary'. It is said that the pair ran a chain across the narrows and levied a toll on passing vessels. Castle Moil (in Gaelic, Caisteal Maol) was a three-storey stronghold of the MacKinnons, dating from the 15th century. It was abandoned as their residence for more comfortable surroundings elsewhere on Skye fairly soon after. The castle assumed its present name, meaning "bare", after it had been deserted and begun to collapse. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339448&mime_type=&launchZoom=39448 Fishing Boat at Kyleakin harbour A rather neglected boat, The Golden Rule II, is seen here berthed at Kyleakin quayside on Skye. Registered in Kirkwall as K856, she was a seiner or seine netter (a fishing boat which deployed a net weighted at the base and with floats along the top edge). In the background, lines of fishing boats are moored alongside each other at the old pier, out of the way of the ferries crossing between the Kyleakin jetty on the extreme left, and Kyle of Lochalsh on the mainland. Few boats are now based at Kyleakin but a recently installed pontoon provides an easier anchorage than that pictured. The name Kyleakin is derived from the Gaelic 'Caol Acain', meaning 'Haakon's Kyle', a reference to King Haakon IV of Norway who assembled a fleet of ships in Loch Alsh prior to engaging with Alexander III of Scotland at the Battle of Largs in 1263. The ruins overlooking the harbour also have a Norwegian link. Tradition has it that there was a much earlier fort on the site, associated with the fourth MacKinnon chief, Findanus, and his Norwegian wife, a princess nicknamed 'Saucy Mary'. It is said that the pair ran a chain across the narrows and levied a toll on passing vessels. Castle Moil (in Gaelic, Caisteal Maol) was a three-storey stronghold of the MacKinnons, dating from the 15th century. It was abandoned as their residence for more comfortable surroundings elsewhere on Skye fairly soon after. The castle assumed its present name, meaning "bare", after it had been deserted and begun to collapse. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339449&mime_type=&launchZoom=39449 Thatched Cottage, Luib This thatched cottage is situated in the township of Luib on Skye. The typical thick rubble walls have rounded corners and the door is placed centrally at the front with the thatch of straw, held by wire netting, creating a low 'fringe' above the windows and door. Luib lies on the shores of Loch Ainort on the east coast of Skye. The name Luib is derived from the Gaelic word for "a bend" and the village does indeed straddle a bend in the A850 main road from Kyleakin to Portree. This road was constructed in the 1940s round the shore of the loch. Originally the township consisted of 24 thatched buildings with associated enclosures, field walls and head-dyke. Today, most of the thatched houses have been slated or are in a derelict condition but a couple remain, restored as self-catering cottages. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339450&mime_type=&launchZoom=39450 Thatched Cottage, Luib This thatched cottage is situated on the loch side of the main road through the township of Luib on Skye. Number 2 Luib was restored and re-thatched and now provides self-catering accommodation, unlike several other similar buildings in the village which are in a ruinous condition. The typical thick rubble walls have rounded corners and the door is placed centrally at the front with the thatch of straw, weighted with large stones, creating a low 'fringe' above the windows and door. The owner pictured on her doorstep was Katie Ann Nicolson and the cottage still bears her name. Luib lies on the shores of Loch Ainort, seen here in the background with the Isle of Raasay beyond, on the east coast of Skye. The name Luib is derived from the Gaelic word for "a bend" and the village does indeed straddle a bend in the A850 main road from Kyleakin to Portree. This road was constructed in the 1940s round the shore of the loch. Originally the township consisted of 24 thatched buildings with associated enclosures, field walls and head-dyke. Today, most of the thatched houses have been slated or are in a derelict condition but a couple remain, restored as self-catering cottages. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339451&mime_type=&launchZoom=39451 Thatched Cottage, Luib This thatched cottage is situated on the loch side of the main road through the township of Luib on Skye. Number 2 Luib was restored and re-thatched and now provides self-catering accommodation, unlike several other similar buildings in the village which are in a ruinous condition. The typical thick rubble walls have rounded corners and the door is placed centrally at the front with the thatch of straw, weighted with large stones, creating a low 'fringe' above the windows and door. The owner pictured on her doorstep was Katie Ann Nicolson and the cottage still bears her name. Luib lies on the shores of Loch Ainort, seen here in the background with the Isle of Raasay beyond, on the east coast of Skye. The name Luib is derived from the Gaelic word for "a bend" and the village does indeed straddle a bend in the A850 main road from Kyleakin to Portree. This road was constructed in the 1940s round the shore of the loch. Originally the township consisted of 24 thatched buildings with associated enclosures, field walls and head-dyke. Today, most of the thatched houses have been slated or are in a derelict condition but a couple remain, restored as self-catering cottages. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339452&mime_type=&launchZoom=39452 Stone Crusher, Isle of Skye This stone-crusher was located in a small quarry beside the Portree to Broadford road near Corran farm, on the Isle of Skye. The quarry provided material for repairing roads. The crusher was manufactured by W.H. Baxter Ltd. of Leeds and was probably operated by an oil engine mounted on a plinth below the machinery. This front view shows its two heavy flywheels with the drive pulley on the right. The plaque reads 'Lubricate this breaker well, Tightened bolts prevent all rapping, And ensure all parts are clean, That's the way to keep it knapping'. Machines like this one can still be found, in varying degrees of degradation, in other parts of the Highlands and Islands. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339453&mime_type=&launchZoom=39453 Stone Crusher, Isle of Skye This stone-crusher was located in a small quarry beside the Portree to Broadford road near Corran farm, on the Isle of Skye. The quarry provided material for repairing roads. The crusher was manufactured by W.H. Baxter Ltd. of Leeds and was probably operated by an oil engine mounted on a plinth below the machinery. Machines like this one can still be found, in varying degrees of degradation, in other parts of the Highlands and Islands. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339454&mime_type=&launchZoom=39454 Harvesting Oats, Dunan, Skye A group of crofters work in a line together cutting oats before drying and stacking for winter feeding. Traditionally, scythes would have been used on this small area but a tractor and reaper may have been used to cut the crop before collecting by hand. The field is in Dunan, at Croft Four, owned by Charles Finlayson (seen here third from the left). The body of water is Loch na Cairidh and beyond is the island of Scalpay. This photograph is part of a series taken on Croft Four, at Dunan on Skye's east coast, opposite the island of Scalpay, which show the processes of cutting, turning and stacking locally grown oats and grass for winter feed. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339455&mime_type=&launchZoom=39455 Harvesting Oats, Dunan, Skye A group of crofters work in a line cutting oats before drying and stacking for winter feeding. A mother and baby are watching proceedings. Traditionally, scythes would have been used on this small area but a tractor and reaper may have been used to cut the crop before collecting by hand. The field is in Dunan, at Croft Four, owned by Charles Finlayson (seen here third from the left). The body of water is Loch na Cairidh and beyond is the island of Scalpay. This photograph is part of a series taken on Croft Four, at Dunan on Skye's east coast, opposite the island of Scalpay, which show the processes of cutting, turning and stacking locally grown oats and grass for winter feed. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339456&mime_type=&launchZoom=39456 Haystacks at Dunan, Skye A crofter turns cut grass to speed up the drying process. Beside him, dried hay or straw has been collected and piled into stacks, probably with a wooden form in the centre to aid drying. A net has been draped over each stack, weighted with stones to prevent the hay blowing away. This photograph is part of a series taken on Croft Four, at Dunan on Skye's east coast, opposite the island of Scalpay, which show the processes of cutting, turning and stacking locally grown oats and grass for winter feed. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339457&mime_type=&launchZoom=39457 Haystacks A crofter turns cut grass to speed up the drying process; a completed haystack can be seen in the background. Dried hay or straw has been collected and piled into stacks, probably with a wooden form in the centre to aid drying, and a net has been draped over each stack, weighted with stones to prevent the hay blowing away. This photograph is part of a series taken on Croft Four, at Dunan on Skye's east coast, opposite the island of Scalpay, which show the processes of cutting, turning and stacking locally grown oats and grass for winter feed. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339458&mime_type=&launchZoom=39458 Scythe and haystack, Skye A Hebridean scythe leans against a haystack on Croft Four at Dunan on the east coast of Skye. Dried hay or straw has been collected and piled into stacks, probably with a wooden form in the centre to aid drying, and a net has been draped over each stack, weighted with stones to prevent the hay blowing away. This photograph is part of a series taken on Croft Four, at Dunan on Skye's east coast, opposite the island of Scalpay, which show the processes of cutting, turning and stacking locally grown oats and grass for winter feed. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339459&mime_type=&launchZoom=39459 Sligachan Bridge, Skye Two bridges now cross the River Sligachan close to the Sligachan Hotel on Skye. One is a modern, dual track bridge which comprises a single concrete span and carries the A87, the main trunk road through Skye. The other is the much older bridge pictured here. The old bridge has three arches in order to span the river which can carry a great deal of water flowing from the Cuillin mountains into the sea at Loch Sligachan. It probably dates from the 1820s when Thomas Telford was designing many buildings and other structures in the Highlands and it may well have replaced an older wooden one, or more likely a natural ford. Sligachan is located at an important junction where the main road between Portree and the south of the island meets the road to Portnalong and Dunvegan on the west coast. It was the site of regular cattle markets and an inn has stood here for centuries. The bridge features in many images with the Cuillin mountain range looming in the background. However in this instance, the great mass of Marsco (736m) dominates the view with its distinctive shoulder prominent on the skyline. A great favourite with walkers and climbers, it is easily accessed from Sligachan. The popular path from Sligachan across the bridge and through Glen Sligachan can just be seen on the left of the photograph. The eight mile route leads to Loch Coruisk and Loch Scavaig. On the extreme left of the photograph is an electricity pole, one of four which many people believed blighted the view. It is also close to the site of a new sculpture to be erected to Norman Collie and John Mackenzie, two renowned pioneers of climbing on Skye. After discussions with the community group planning the sculpture, Southern Electric removed the poles in the summer of 2009. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339460&mime_type=&launchZoom=39460 Portree Harbour This photograph was taken from Portree pier, on the Isle of Skye, and shows Beaumont Crescent along the shoreline with Quay Brae behind and Mill Road to the right. Portree expanded from the harbour area. Until the late 1950s, daily steamers arrived carrying passengers, cargo and mail. However, as roads were gradually upgraded throughout the island, the pier became less important. The commercial fishing industry has also reduced considerably since then. Because of its sheltered position however, the harbour provides a good anchorage for yachts and pleasure crafts and is busy in the summer months. The harbour is overlooked by the imposing Royal Hotel, seen here on the upper left of the photograph. The houses built along the natural curve of the shoreline on Beaumont Crescent are solid, substantial dwellings. They were advertised in 1839 as 'neatly furnished and well adapted for respectable families'. Captain Beaumont was the husband of the third Lord Macdonald's daughter. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339461&mime_type=&launchZoom=39461 Fishing Boats at Portree harbour Fishing boats lie at anchor close to the quay at Portree, on the Isle of Skye. Portree expanded from the harbour area. Until the late 1950s, daily steamers arrived carrying passengers, cargo and mail. However, as roads were gradually upgraded throughout the island, the pier became less important. The commercial fishing industry has also reduced considerably since then. Because of its sheltered position however, the harbour provides a good anchorage for yachts and pleasure crafts and is busy in the summer months. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339462&mime_type=&launchZoom=39462 Skye Terriers These little dogs are West Highland White Terriers, commonly known as Westies. They are a sturdy Scottish breed of dog with a distinctive white coat, pointed ears and dark almond-shaped eyes. Westies are a medium-sized terrier but have longer legs than other Scottish breeds of terrier. They have a white double coat of fur which fills out the dog's face giving it a rounded appearance. As with many breeds which were originally used as working dogs, the terriers are active dogs requiring a lot of exercise. The dogs are descended from a number of breeding programmes of white terriers in Scotland prior to the 20th century and were given their modern name for the first time in 1908. They were recognised by major kennel clubs around the same time. The breed remains popular in the UK and the USA and has been featured in television and film including the popular drama set in the Highlands 'Hamish Macbeth'. A Westie also features in advertising for a major dog food company and a Scotch Whisky company. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339463&mime_type=&launchZoom=39463 Drum Major, Isle of Skye Pipe Band The Drum Major (DM) of the Isle of Skye Pipe Band, Jimmy Devlin, stands resplendent in his full Highland Dress uniform. This comprises a Cameron of Erracht tartan kilt, red collared tunic, plaid, white spats (or gaiters) and tartan topped hose. An ostrich feather bonnet and the mace and white gauntlets of his position complete his attire. The photograph was taken at the Isle of Skye Games in Portree, probably in 1973. The uniform of the Drum Major is often different from the rest of the band, being more traditional in style and providing a very visual image of the band they represent. The Drum Major's role today is very different from the historical position he once held as a military leader in charge of the drum corps during battles. The modern Drum Major still has to have a military bearing and dignity, and indeed still leads the band from the front. However the position today has little involvement with the music which is guided by the Pipe Major along with the Drum Sergeant. The timing and direction of the march is controlled by the DM with the mace or staff as well as vocal commands and instructions. The Portree Pipe band was first formed in the late 1920s by Post Master William Watson. In March 1961, having been in abeyance since World War II, it reformed under the title of the Isle of Skye Pipe Band. Fundraising and instruction of young pipers and drummers helped to re-establish and strengthen the band which has played abroad and also for the Queen at the Balmoral Highland Games. During the summer months they can be heard in the main square in Portree. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339464&mime_type=&launchZoom=39464 Isle of Skye Pipe Band, Highland Games, Portree The Isle of Skye Pipe Band entertains the crowd at the Highland Games in Portree, led by Drum Major Jimmy Devlin. Leading the pipers are Pipe Major Donnie Mackenzie on the left and Pipe Sergeant Murdo MacDonald on the right. The drummers seen on the left at the back are Donald John Campbell from Bernisdale, James Lamont and Peter MacDonald, a new young recruit to the band. The Portree Pipe band was first formed in the late 1920s by Post Master William Watson. In March 1961, having been in abeyance since World War II, it reformed under the title of the Isle of Skye Pipe Band. Fundraising and instruction of young pipers and drummers helped to re-establish and strengthen the band which has played abroad and also for the Queen at the Balmoral Highland Games. During the summer months they can be heard in the main square in Portree. Although looking like a natural amphitheatre, the arena used for the Highland Games and other events was mostly created when stone was quarried for building work in Portree, including the Skye Gathering Hall. An early reference to "Lord Macdonald's Games" occurs in 1833 and these were undoubtedly a precursor of the modern games. They took place at Home Farm in Portree until land was purchased in 1892 at the Meall, or the "Lump", as it is more often referred to. The first Skye Games took place on 6 September 1877 and were linked to the annual Skye Balls held in September. The events are now independent of each other and the Games are a prominent feature of the summer tourist season on Skye, taking place on the first Wednesday in August. Due to recent increases in the number of visitors, certain alterations have had to be made to the retaining wall round the cliffs. A new external walk has been created and this gives good views of Portree harbour and the loch. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339465&mime_type=&launchZoom=39465 Isle of Skye Pipe Band, Highland Games, Portree The Isle of Skye Pipe Band entertains the crowd at the Highland Games in Portree while one of the athletic competitions continues in the background. Officiating at that event is Colonel Jock Macdonald (left) whose family have been associated with the Games since their inception. Colonel Macdonald was a noted piping judge. On the right is Procurator Fiscal Donald MacMillan. The Portree Pipe band was first formed in the late 1920s by Post Master William Watson. In March 1961, having been in abeyance since World War II, it reformed under the title of the Isle of Skye Pipe Band. Fundraising and instruction of young pipers and drummers helped to re-establish and strengthen the band which has played abroad and also for the Queen at the Balmoral Highland Games. During the summer months they can be heard in the main square in Portree. Although looking like a natural amphitheatre, the arena used for the Highland Games and other events was mostly created when stone was quarried for building work in Portree, including the Skye Gathering Hall. An early reference to "Lord Macdonald's Games" occurs in 1833 and these were undoubtedly a precursor of the modern games. They took place at Home Farm in Portree until land was purchased in 1892 at the Meall, or the "Lump", as it is more often referred to. The first Skye Games took place on 6 September 1877 and were linked to the annual Skye Balls held in September. The events are now independent of each other and the Games are a prominent feature of the summer tourist season on Skye, taking place on the first Wednesday in August. Due to recent increases in the number of visitors, certain alterations have had to be made to the retaining wall round the cliffs. A new external walk has been created and this gives good views of Portree harbour and the loch. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339466&mime_type=&launchZoom=39466 Highland Games, Portree, Isle of Skye Two members of the Isle of Skye Pipe Band, brothers Murdo and Seamus Archie MacDonald, from Kilvaxter, watch proceedings at the Highland Games in Portree. Beside them are spectators dressed appropriately for the damp weather. The pipers are wearing traditional dress uniform, sometimes referred to as Number 1 uniform, comprising Macdonald of Sleat tartan kilts, black collared tunic with tartan plaid, horsehair dress sporran, white spats (or gaiters) and cream hose with tartan tops. Glengarry bonnets complete the outfit although ostrich feather bonnets would probably have been worn while performing. The current (2013) uniform is much simpler and less expensive. It comprises an Isle of Skye tartan kilt and matching tie, black waistcoat and jacket, pale blue shirt and cream hose with tartan flashes. All the band members, apart from the Drum Major, now wear Glengarry bonnets or caps. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339467&mime_type=&launchZoom=39467 Throwing the Hammer at the Highland Games, Portree, Skye An array of waterproof coats and jackets in the crowd provides a colourful backdrop to one of the 'Heavy' events at the Skye Games as a competitor throws the hammer and a piper paces the display platform behind, no doubt playing a March. The 'Heavy' events in the Highland Games, which take place throughout northern Scotland during the summer months, include Tossing the Caber, Putting the Shot and Throwing a Weight over a Bar, and Throwing the Hammer. Competitors aim to throw a hammer (a metal ball weighing about 22 lbs which is attached to a wooden handle) as far as they can. Using a circular motion to whirl the hammer above their head before releasing it behind them, each competitor has three attempts. They are not allowed to move their feet or they are disqualified. The person achieving the greatest distance wins the event. The majority of those taking part, and certainly the winners, train very seriously and compete at events across the Highlands. Although looking like a natural amphitheatre, the arena used for the Highland Games and other events was mostly created when stone was quarried for building work in Portree, including the Skye Gathering Hall. An early reference to "Lord Macdonald's Games" occurs in 1833 and these were undoubtedly a precursor of the modern games. They took place at Home Farm in Portree until land was purchased in 1892 at the Meall, or the "Lump", as it is more often referred to. The first Skye Games took place on 6 September 1877 and were linked to the annual Skye Balls held in September. The events are now independent of each other and the Games are a prominent feature of the summer tourist season on Skye, taking place on the first Wednesday in August. Due to recent increases in the number of visitors, certain alterations have had to be made to the retaining wall round the cliffs. A new external walk has been created and this gives good views of Portree harbour and the loch. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339468&mime_type=&launchZoom=39468 Tossing the Caber, Skye Games, Portree One of the officiating judges seems to be standing perilously close to the landing spot of the caber that has just been tossed at the Skye Games arena in Portree. The 'Heavy' events in the Highland Games, which take place throughout northern Scotland during the Summer months, include Throwing the Hammer, Putting the Shot and Throwing a Weight over a Bar, but probably the most iconic is Tossing the Caber. This event may have originated in the past with the need to ford burns or gullies by throwing a length of wood or newly felled tree across. Technique as well as brute strength is required to toss the caber accurately. The caber is a trunk of Scots Pine or larch measuring approximately 5 - 6 metres (16 - 20 feet) in length. The competitor has to lift the caber in both hands and toss it so that it flips over on its end in as direct a line as possible. Distance is not the objective. Instead, degrees of height reached and the final position of the caber are taken into account when deciding the winner. Although looking like a natural amphitheatre, the arena used for the Highland Games and other events was mostly created when stone was quarried for building work in Portree, including the Skye Gathering Hall. An early reference to "Lord Macdonald's Games" occurs in 1833 and these were undoubtedly a precursor of the modern games. They took place at Home Farm in Portree until land was purchased in 1892 at the Meall, or the "Lump", as it is more often referred to. The first Skye Games took place on 6 September 1877 and were linked to the annual Skye Balls held in September. The events are now independent of each other and the Games are a prominent feature of the summer tourist season on Skye, taking place on the first Wednesday in August. Due to recent increases in the number of visitors, certain alterations have had to be made to the retaining wall round the cliffs. A new external walk has been created and this gives good views of Portree harbour and the loch. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339469&mime_type=&launchZoom=39469 Highland dancers, Skye Games, Portree Four young dancers attempt the Sword Dance at the Skye Games in Portree, Isle of Skye. Highland Dancing has always been a popular feature of Highland Games, along with Piping, track & field events and, of course, the 'Heavy' events such as 'Tossing the Caber' and 'Tug of War'. Highland Dancing was originally a male pursuit to allow them to display their strength and athleticism. Indeed, the purpose of the Sword Dance in its original form may have been to demonstrate the power of the victor over a defeated rival using bloodied swords belonging to each of the combatants. Nowadays, the competitions are dominated by young girls displaying their nimbleness and accurate timing as they perform to traditional pipe tunes. Olivia James The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre. 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2339470&mime_type=&launchZoom=39470