<link>http://www.ambaile.org.uk/</link> <logo url="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/images/logo.gif"/> <atom:link rel="next" href="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/?language=en&service=search&action=do_quick_search&q=&rss_mode=1&page=2"/> <item> <title>A paddle steamer on Loch Maree A photograph of a paddle steamer on Loch Maree. Mr Duncan Darroch, 4th Baron of Gourock, is one of the passengers on board. He bought the Torridon estate in 1873 and improved the economic fortunes of the people who lived on it. He established a deer forest, returned traditional crofting land to tenants, gave access to upland areas for cattle grazing and loaned money to his tenants to purchase livestock and boats. He died in 1910 at Torridon House, and a commemorative stone was placed close to the road that runs along Loch Maree by his widow. The inscription on it reads: "This stone was erected in 1912 by Ann widow of Duncan Darroch of Gourock and Torridon in memory of the devotion and affection shown by one hundred men on the estate of Torridon who at their own request carried his body from the house here on its way to interment in the family burial place at Gourock." This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Gairloch Heritage Museum http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%235497&mime_type=&launchZoom=5497 Group at a supermarket checkout This image was recently highlighted in Am Baile's 'Picture Detective' feature, run in conjunction with the Inverness Courier. It shows Ross and Rosemary Macdonald having just completed a two-minute trolley dash round the William Low supermarket which was located on Tomnahurich Street in Inverness. The dash was sponsored by Kimberly Clark and was a prize for competitors taking part in the Loch Rannoch marathon. Ross recalls filling seven trolleys with everything from coffee to washing powder. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2318289&mime_type=&launchZoom=18289 Two ladies in deck chairs This photograph of two ladies, one of whom is Mrs. E. J. Malherbe, is part of the JLM Mitchell Archive of the Gaelic Society of Inverness. The ladies are probably ancestors of Mitchell. Sheriff James Lachlan Martin Mitchell (b. 13 June 1929) was a native of Inverness and son of well-known doctor, Lachlan Mitchell. He was appointed full-time sheriff in Edinburgh in 1978 and served there until his retirement in 1995. He died on 26 November 2001 For further information about this item and the collection to which it belongs, please email the Highland Archive Service http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%238256&mime_type=&launchZoom=8256 School rock band, Culloden Academy This image was recently highlighted in Am Baile's 'Picture Detective' feature, run in conjunction with the Inverness Courier. It shows three pupils from Culloden Academy who were in a rock band together. They are, from left to right, Simon McFadden (bass guitar), "Cheeky" Dave Donaldson (drums) and "Far Out" Tony Romaine (guitar). Unfortunately, the name of their band seems to have been lost in the mists of time... This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2318390&mime_type=&launchZoom=18390 MV Clansman at Ullapool Before 1972 a ferry from the Isle of Lewis went from Loch Seaforth, via Kyle of Lochalsh to Mallaig on the mainland. On 1st May 1972 a ferry service began using the much shorter route from Ullapool to Stornoway. The first ferry, the 'Iona', needed to use side hoists to load as linkspans were not ready at Stornoway or Ullapool. With the completion of the linkspans and the arrival of the 'Clansman', cars were able to 'roll on' at one end and 'roll off' at the other making loading and unloading easier and quicker. The 'Clansman' was replaced by 'Suilven' in 1973/74 and the current ferry, 'Isle of Lewis', took over the route in 1995/96. The Ullapool - Stornoway route is now one of Caledonian MacBrayne's busiest and carries around 92,000 passengers a year. There are two or three return sailings a day, six days a week and from July 2009 there has also been a return sailing on a Sunday. This photo shows the 'Clansman' arriving at Ullapool. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2314210&mime_type=&launchZoom=14210 Union Street, Inverness, 1897 - Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee Union Street, Inverness on the occasion of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee celebrations on 22 June, 1897. The street is festooned with flags, banners, garlands and bunting. Local celebrations for Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee took place in almost every community in the United Kingdom. It was also celebrated throughout the British Empire. Local societies, organisations and individuals got together to mark the Queen's sixtieth year on the throne. It was a time when many monuments, community halls and buildings were erected This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311283&mime_type=&launchZoom=11283 Town Hall, Dingwall This photograph shows Dingwall Town Hall, with Hugh A Ross, retailer, on the right, at the corner of Church Street and the High Street. (Today the corner location houses a charity shop.) Dingwall Town Hall stands on the north side of Dingwall High Street and was originally the site of the tolbooth. The earliest parts of the building date from the 17th century but there was extensive remodelling carried out in 1732-3 and 1782, as well as in 1905 and 1925. The jail was declared unfit for prisoners in 1830. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2313757&mime_type=&launchZoom=13757 Helen Keller on the Skye ferry Helen Keller (1880 - 1968) was an American author and lecturer. She was blind and deaf from the age of two, but was taught to read, write, use sign language and speak by Anne Sullivan Macy. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1904 and became famous for her work for the handicapped. Can you help us identify the make and model of the vehicle? If so, please contact us This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311792&mime_type=&launchZoom=11792 Gille Pàdraig Dubh This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation. Gille Pàdraig Dubh. At one time there was a brave man called Gille Pàdraig Dubh who lived in Gearraidh Fliuch in South Uist. He was a strong, sturdy man and a noted soldier. It happened that Macleod of Dunvegan, father-in-law of Mac Ic Ailein, Lord of Uist, was visiting in Ormacleit Castle, where Mac Ic Ailein had his home. Did they not decide between them that they would kill Gille Pàdraig Dubh and his son by trickery, for the son had grown up just as strong and powerful as his father, and they were afraid of him. They sent word to Gille Pàdraig inviting him to come to a feast in the castle and to take Iain Dubh, his son, with him there. They both came, as they were asked, and Mac Ic Ailein was there waiting for them at the main door of the castle. He gave Gille Pàdraig a great welcome. "It's a long time," said Gille Pàdraig Dubh, "since I last had an invitation to come here, and indeed I know well that it's not without reason that I am here today." "Och," replied Mac Ic Ailein, "there was enmity between me and you before now without a doubt, but that is over now. But to tell you the truth, I did have a job for you. Macleod tells me that there is a man in his island who can split an egg with an arrow off a man's head at a distance of eighty paces, and he placed a large wager with me that there is not a similar man here in our part of the country. I have accepted his wager and as there is nobody else except you alone capable of doing this, if you do not get me out of difficulty today I am finished and the island is humiliated." "Very well then," replied Gille Pàdraig Dubh. "Although I am getting old I'll do my best, just as well as I am able ... but who will hold the egg on his head?" "I will need," answered Mac Ic Ailein, "to stay just here along with Macleod in case he becomes suspicious of us. Will your son Iain not do? Surely he will?" "It seems that he has to," said Gille Pàdraig, "but you send out to me here four men with spades." He did as Gille Pàdraig asked. The four men came out with the spades, and Macleod himself measured out the steps from the wall of the castle. Where he stopped, Gille Pàdraig Dubh asked them to dig a pit. When the hole was quite deep he told his son to go down into it. He was not at all willing to do so. "Is it refusing me you are?" his father asked him. Iain well remembered that an arrow in his heel was the reward he received the last time he refused to obey his father. "Indeed I'm not doing so," he replied, jumping into the hole. When he stood on the bottom of the hole he was hidden up to the shoulders; and his father told the men with the spades to carry on digging until all that was to be seen of him was the hair on the top of his head. Gille Pàdraig set the egg on the top of his head and walked back to the castle wall. He took the quiver towards him and placed the first arrow he removed from it in the garter of his right leg, and the next one in the other garter and then he put four in his belt. He placed the last arrow in the bow and smashed the egg to smithereens. "Are you wounded, Iain Dubh?" shouted Gille Pàdraig Dubh. "Not at all," answered Iain, climbing out of the hole. "You certainly won the wager that I placed with your master," said Macleod, "but tell me why you rejected the arrows you picked first." "I will tell you that," he replied, pulling an arrow from the garter. "If one drop of my son's blood had been spilt, that one would have been in the most important bird in the nest, that is Mac Ic Ailein; that one would have been in you, Macleod, and the others in the men who dug my son's grave." "Be gone, away you go," said Mac Ic Ailein, "there's no point in trying to change you." This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd' http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%232351&mime_type=&launchZoom=2351 The Young Piper of South Uist This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation. The Young Piper of South Uist. Long ago in South Uist there was an old man who had three sons. The two older ones were very good pipers, but the youngest one was not particularly good at all. At this time the MacCrimmons in Dunvegan were pipers to the MacLeod chiefs, and they heard about these lads in Uist. They considered that they would go over to Uist to see if they could find out who were the better pipers, themselves or the old man's sons. When they arrived in Uist the lads were not at home, and their father told the MacCrimmons that they would not be returning home for a day or two. It so happened that the youngest of the boys was at this time out herding cattle on a green hill far away from their home. There he heard the sweetest and most beautiful music he had ever heard and he immediately thought that this hill was a fairy knoll. Without delay he made for the door, but before entering he placed a stick in the doorway, for he knew that if he did that he would be able to get out again, but if he did not that he would be inside forever more. As soon as he went in he asked the little old man who was playing the pipes to teach him the tune. The old man asked him to place his tongue in his mouth. He did so and straight away he learned the tune. When the young man arrived home the MacCrimmons were inside waiting for him and they asked him to start up his pipes to see whether he or they played better. The old man told them that there wouldn't be any point in that, that the young fellow was of no use at all. "Never mind", said they, "he'll have a go anyway, whether he's good or bad." The lad started up his pipes and played the tune which the fairy taught him. When the MacCrimmons heard this beautiful, sweet music they said "If that is the poorest one there's no point at all in our competing with the best ones." And they just returned at once to Dunvegan. This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd' http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%232359&mime_type=&launchZoom=2359 Invitation to John MacLeod's Coming of Age Invitations were sent out by Dame Flora MacLeod of MacLeod, 28th Chief of the Clan, to celebrate the coming of age of her twin grandsons, John and Patrick Wolridge Gordon on Thursday 16 August 1956. John subsequently became MacLeod of MacLeod, the 29th Chief of the Clan. The occasion was marked in the grounds of Dunvegan Castle, and photographed by Duncan Macpherson This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%237348&mime_type=&launchZoom=7348 Illustration of a Highland Gentleman/Piper in full dress In the aftermath of the last Jacobite Rebellion a series of Acts of Parliament launched an assault on the culture of Gaeldom including the proscription of Highland dress and the playing of pipes. The form of Highland dress has always owed much to the army and it was the Highland regiments which kept the kilt and the tartan alive until, in 1782, their use was once more permitted. Before that time, Scots were only permitted to wear any 'tartanry', if they joined the British Armed Services. Pipers were permitted to wear their kilt, but usually in a Regimental color. The kilt itself in its original form was a very basic garment which required neither tailoring nor the frequent replacement which a pair of breeches needed. The tartan cloth forming a piece of material some two metres in width by four or five metres in length. This was known variously as the Breacan, the Feileadh Bhreacain and the Feileadh Mor - the big kilt, usually referrred to in English as the belted plaid. The belted plaid had many advantages in the Highland climate and terrain. It allowed freedom of movement, it was warm, the upper half could provide a voluminous cloak against the weather, it dried out quickly and with much less discomfort than trousers and, if required, it could, by undoing the belt, provide a very adequate overnight blanket. The tightly woven wool proved almost completely waterproof, something the lose woven wool of today is not. When complete freedom of action was required in battle it was easily discarded, and one famous Highland clan battle, that between the Frasers the MacDonalds and Camerons in 1544, is known as Blar-na-Leine, which can be translated as 'Field of the Shirts'. The bagpipes are thought to have been used in ancient Egypt. The origins of the pipes in Scotland is unclear. It had been suggested that they were a Roman import. Others have claimed that the instrument came from Ireland as a result of colonisation. The original pipes in Scotland had only a single drone. The second drone was added in the mid to late 1500s. The third drone, or the 'great drone', came into use early in the 1700s. Beginning with Iain Odhar, who lived in the mid-16th century, the MacCrimmon family was responsible for elevating Highland pipe music to new heights. This music is called piobaireachd (pronounced piobroch). Clan pipers' titles were mostly hereditary and held in much esteem. The best known were the MacCrimmons, pipers to MacLeod of Dunvegan; the MacAuthurs, pipers to MacDonald of the Isles; the MacKays, pipers to the MacKenzie; the Rankins, pipers to MacLean of Duart This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311391&mime_type=&launchZoom=11391 Dunvegan Castle from the west, Isle of Skye Dunvegan Castle as seen from the west, Island of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311423&mime_type=&launchZoom=11423 Back entrance to Dunvegan Castle, Island of Skye Back entrance to Dunvegan Castle, Island of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311435&mime_type=&launchZoom=11435 Dunvegan Castle, Isle of Skye Dunvegan Castle is the seat of Clan MacLeod. Leod, the clan's founder, either built the structure, or gained it as part of his wife's dowry, in the 13th century. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email the Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311461&mime_type=&launchZoom=11461 Royal Visit, Kyle of Lochalsh The Duke and Duchess of York arrived at Kyle of Lochalsh by train, then crossed by motor launch onto a yacht owned by Commander Kitson, R.N. They then landed in Kyleakin before travelling up to Dunvegan Castle. The Duke and Duchess officially opened the boys' hostel in Portree during their stay, and visited Portnalong to see the different aspects of the local weaving industry This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311733&mime_type=&launchZoom=11733 Dunvegan bus on Skye The Dunvegan bus route was run by the Nicolson family. The ST registration is from Inverness-shire. If you can provide any more information about the vehicle in this photograph, please contact us. This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311793&mime_type=&launchZoom=11793 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle is situated on a rocky promontory jutting into Loch Dunvegan, on Skye. It has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th century, although they were first named in an official document of 1439, as "of Dunvegan". The castle is believed to have been continuously occupied by the same family since then, longer than any other Scottish castle. Parts of the castle date from the 13th century, the keep with dungeon from the 14th, and parts from the 18th century. More recently, the whole building has been harled and castellated. It is now a major tourist attraction on Skye, with the public rooms displaying various clan relics. This photograph shows surface repairs being carried out to the front entrance, alongside which is parked a car or van of the period This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311805&mime_type=&launchZoom=11805 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle is situated on a rocky promontory jutting into Loch Dunvegan, on Skye. It has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th century and is believed to have been continuously occupied by the same family since then, longer than any other Scottish Castle. Parts of the castle date from the 13th century, the keep with dungeon from the 14th, and parts from the 18th century. More recently, the whole building has been harled and castellated. It is now a major tourist attraction on Skye, with the public rooms displaying various clan relics This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311806&mime_type=&launchZoom=11806 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle is situated on a rocky promontory jutting into Loch Dunvegan, on Skye. It has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th century, although they were first named in an official document of 1439, as "of Dunvegan". The castle is believed to have been continuously occupied by the same family since then, longer than any other Scottish castle. Parts of the castle date from the 13th century, the keep with dungeon from the 14th, and parts from the 18th century. More recently, the whole building has been harled and castellated. It is now a major tourist attraction on Skye, with the public rooms displaying various clan relics. This photograph shows surface repairs being carried out to the front entrance, alongside which is parked a car or van of the period This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311858&mime_type=&launchZoom=11858 The Cuillin Duncan Macpherson has taken this wonderful photograph of the Cuillin - the magnificent mountain range - from the Dunvegan road looking south. Barely visible on the left are the peaks of Glamaig. Looking south is the Pinnacle Ridge with the magnificent Sgurr nan Gillean, first recorded ascent in 1836, and the long slope of Bruach na Frithe. The Black Cuillin take their name from the dark gabbro rock. The range has twenty Munros, including the thrilling Inaccessible Pinnacle (Sgurr Dearg) and Sgurr Alasdair. Visitors come from all over the world, to climb or just to view This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311936&mime_type=&launchZoom=11936 John MacLeod's coming of age This photograph was taken on the lawn of Dunvegan Castle on Thursday 16 August 1956. The occasion is the coming of age of John Macleod and his twin brother Patrick Wolridge Gordon, Dame Flora MacLeod's grandsons. Duncan Macpherson, the photographer, received an invitation to the event from Dame Flora, who is seen in the photograph addressing the crowd. The story goes that the small dog made off with the scroll presented to John Macleod This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311991&mime_type=&launchZoom=11991 John MacLeod's coming of age This photograph was taken on the lawn of Dunvegan Castle on the occasion of the coming of age of John Macleod and his twin brother Patrick Wolridge Gordon, Dame Flora MacLeod's grandsons. Duncan Macpherson, the photographer, received an invitation to the event from Dame Flora, who is seen in the photograph addressing the crowd. The story goes that the small dog made off with the scroll presented to John Macleod This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2311993&mime_type=&launchZoom=11993 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle is situated on a rocky promontory jutting into Loch Dunvegan, on Skye. It has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th century, although they were first named in an official document of 1439, as "of Dunvegan". The castle is believed to have been continuously occupied by the same family since then, longer than any other Scottish Castle. Parts of the castle date from the 13th century, the keep with dungeon from the 14th, and parts from the 18th century. More recently, the whole building has been harled and castellated. It is now a major tourist attraction on Skye, with the public rooms displaying various clan relics. This photograph shows the front entrance This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312098&mime_type=&launchZoom=12098 Dunvegan Castle, Isle of Skye Dunvegan Castle is situated on a rocky promontory jutting into Loch Dunvegan, on Skye. It has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th century, although they were first named in an official document of 1439, as "of Dunvegan". The castle is believed to have been continuously occupied by the same family since then, longer than any other Scottish castle. Parts of the castle date from the 13th century, the keep with dungeon from the 14th, and parts from the 18th century. More recently, the whole building has been harled and castellated. It is now a major tourist attraction on Skye, with the public rooms displaying various clan relics. This photograph shows surface repairs being carried out to the front entrance, alongside which is parked a car or van of the period This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312160&mime_type=&launchZoom=12160 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle is situated on a rocky promontory jutting into Loch Dunvegan, on Skye. It has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th century, although they were first named in an official document of 1439, as "of Dunvegan". The castle is believed to have been continuously occupied by the same family since then, longer than any other Scottish Castle. Parts of the castle date from the 13th century, the keep with dungeon from the 14th, and parts from the 18th century. More recently, the whole building has been harled and castellated. It is now a major tourist attraction on Skye, with the public rooms displaying various clan relics This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312326&mime_type=&launchZoom=12326 Thatched house, Isle of Skye Duncan Macpherson, the Kyle pharmacist and keen photographer, was interested in recording local everyday scenes and rural Highland life which he realised was fast disappearing. Produced as a postcard in the Kyle Pharmacy Series, the photograph was taken in Bernisdale, about 7 miles to the north west of Portree on the Dunvegan road. Thatched houses in the Western Highlands, such as the one pictured, often showed a combination of styles, with the rounded end walls of the Outer Hebrides and the roof sprung from the top of a single wall with the thatch overhanging as is found in the Central Highlands. The peat stack stands ready for use close to the door This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312358&mime_type=&launchZoom=12358 Royal Yacht "Britannia" The Royal yacht is sailing past Kyle of Lochalsh in calm seas with flags flying. The Lochalsh Hotel is visible in the background. Queen Elizabeth, accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Margaret visited the area on 14 August 1956, arriving at Kyleakin and leaving to rejoin "Britannia" from Dunvegan This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312468&mime_type=&launchZoom=12468 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle in the northwest of the Isle of Skye has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th Century. The castle is a major tourist attraction on the island, with various rooms displaying clan relics. This photograph shows the Castle from Loch Dunvegan This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312727&mime_type=&launchZoom=12727 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle in the northwest of the Isle of Skye has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th Century. The castle is a major tourist attraction on the island, with various rooms displaying clan relics. This photograph shows the main entrance, reached through extensive gardens, and Loch Dunvegan in the background This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312728&mime_type=&launchZoom=12728 Dunvegan Castle from the shore of Loch Dunvegan Dunvegan Castle is on a rocky promontory jutting into Loch Dunvegan, on Skye. It has been the home of the MacLeods since the 13th century, although they were first named as "of Dunvegan" in an official document of 1439. The castle is believed to have been continuously occupied by the same family since then, longer than any other Scottish Castle. Parts of the castle date from the 13th century, the keep with dungeon from the 14th, and parts from the 18th century. More recently, the whole building has been harled and castellated. It is now a major tourist attraction on Skye, with the public rooms displaying various clan relics. This photograph shows the side of the castle taken from the shore of the loch. This area is now a large garden open to the public This image can be purchased. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312790&mime_type=&launchZoom=12790 Glamaig, Skye A postcard of Glamaig on the Isle of Skye. Glamaig, with an elevation of 775 metres, is the highest of the Red Hills. Together with the rocky, jagged Black Cuillin ridge, the lower Red Hills (sometimes known as the Red Cuillin) form the Cuillin mountain range. In 1899, Gurkha soldier Harkabir Thapa ran barefoot from Sligachan Hotel to the top of Glamaig and back again in 55 minutes. The Glamaig Hill Race now takes places every July, and it wasn't until the 1980s that Thapa's record was finally broken. Until the 19th century the Cuillin range, especially the Black Cuillin, were regarded as unclimbable and most of the peaks were not ascended until the mid-to-late 1800s. Two Skye-born climbers, John MacKenzie of Sconser and Sheriff Alexander Nicolson made many significant first ascents in the range and both have peaks named in their honour: Sgurr Mhic Choinnich (MacKenzie's Peak) and Sgurr Alasdair (Alexander's Peak). The range has also made headlines in more recent times, when John MacLeod of MacLeod put the Black Cuillin on the market for £10 million in 2000, in order to fund repairs of his Clan seat, Dunvegan Castle. In 2003, after enormous public outcry, MacLeod agreed to gift the mountains to the nation on the condition that a charitable trust renovated his castle. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312853&mime_type=&launchZoom=12853 Dunvegan Castle from the west, Isle of Skye Dunvegan Castle as seen from the west, Island of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312910&mime_type=&launchZoom=12910 Dunvegan Castle from the west, Isle of Skye Dunvegan Castle as seen from the west, Island of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312912&mime_type=&launchZoom=12912 Kilmuir Graveyard, Dunvegan, The Burial Place of the MacLeods This postcard shows Kilmuir graveyard in Dunvegan situated on high ground overlooking Loch Dunvegan. A stone wall encloses the gravestones surrounding the ruins of St Mary's Chapel. The roofless ruin has a date of 1694 over the north entrance, but the condition of some stones predates this period. There are also late medieval gravestones and some 18th century table stones. Central is an obelisk from the early 18th century, in memory of Lord Thomas Frazer, father of Simon Fraser of Lovat, who died while visiting the Chief at Dunvegan Castle in 1699. For many years the principal burial site for the MacLeod Chiefs was at Rodel, Isle of Harris, but latterly the Clan Chiefs were buried at Kilmuir. Within the walls of the ruin are buried the MacLeod Chiefs since the 24th Chief, John Norman who died in 1835. He and his wife Anne and his daughter Emily, the historian, had been very involved in life at Dunvegan and improvements to the Castle. The most recent burial was the 29th Chief, John MacLeod who was buried there 24th February 2007. Also many of the famous MacCrimmons, the hereditary pipers to the MacLeods were buried here. A tablet is placed on the wall of the church in memory of these great pipers. Other MacLeod families have burial areas in the graveyard, including the MacLeods of Suardal, Herebost, Struan, Hamer Greshornish and Orbost. The hereditary wardens of Dunvegan Castle, the McSweens of Roag, one of Skye's oldest tribes are on the west side of the churchyard, with carved grave slabs with claymore and foliage designs on them. The MacLeod names dominate but many other families are buried here as well. This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Skye and Lochalsh Archives http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2312919&mime_type=&launchZoom=12919 The Three Chimneys Restaurant, Colbost, Isle of Skye A crofter's cottage on a Hebridean island is an unlikely location for a world class restaurant but the Three Chimneys at Colbost in the northwest corner of Skye is just that. It was once a typical croft house, with the village shop attached. In the days when roads were poor and cars few and far between, steamers would moor in Loch Dunvegan and goods would be brought ashore by boat. The AA sign in the photograph now bears triple rosettes and five stars. These are among the many awards and accolades won by Shirley and Eddie Spiers since they opened the restaurant in the early 1980s. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2315805&mime_type=&launchZoom=15805 Road signs, Skye These signs at Lonmore, near Dunvegan, direct tourists to various attractions on the route to Glendale. Lonmore lies at the junction of the A863 and the B884. The latter is a largely single track road around the shores of Loch Dunvegan and across the headland into Glendale. Several of the businesses advertised are no longer in existence but others, such as the Three Chimneys Restaurant, have developed and expanded. The church in the background is the Lonmore Free Church and manse. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2315806&mime_type=&launchZoom=15806 Dunvegan Castle from the sea Dunvegan Castle is the seat of Clan MacLeod. Leod, the clan's progenitor, either built the structure, or gained it as part of his wife's dowry, sometime in the 13th century. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was almost impossible to penetrate. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep. It dates back to the 14th century and was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. The Castle and the famous relics it contains, along with the surrounding gardens, are a hugely popular attraction on Skye. Thousands of visitors peer down into the dungeon, gaze at the Zoffany and Raeburn paintings of MacLeod ancestors, and admire the ancient legendary Fairy Flag, flown only when Clan MacLeod are in peril. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2315809&mime_type=&launchZoom=15809 Gates at Dunvegan Castle The pair of square crenellated gatepiers pictured here support wrought iron gates with a Celtic motif. Together they mark the entrance to the driveway to Dunvegan Castle. A lower pier sits alongside; this is the pedestrian entrance. The gatepiers were erected in 1938 by tenants and Macleod clansmen, in memory of three Macleod brothers, Norman Magnus, Reginald and Roderick. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2315810&mime_type=&launchZoom=15810 Memorial for Flora MacLeod, 28th Chief of MacLeod Flora Louisa Cecilia Macleod was born in London in 1878. She became the 28th Chief of the Clan Macleod on the death of her father in 1935. She was the first, and so far only, women to have held the title. She opened Dunvegan Castle to the public making it a popular visitor attraction and travelled throughout the world establishing Clan Macleod Societies. She was created Dame Commander of the British Empire in 1953. She died in 1976 at the age of 98 and is buried in the traditional Macleod burial ground near Dunvegan on Skye. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2315812&mime_type=&launchZoom=15812 Loch Bay, Waternish, Skye The Waternish peninsula, one of the three most prominent in the north of Skye, juts into the Little Minch, with Loch Dunvegan on the west and Loch Snizort on the east. The house pictured is in Lusta, on the only road into the area. It overlooks Loch Bay and the houses of Camus Lusta along the shore. To the right, just out of shot, lies the small community of Stein. Stein began life as a British Fisheries planned village but it failed to develop as expected. Today it is a quiet and picturesque holiday destination for those seeking peace and quiet. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2315815&mime_type=&launchZoom=15815 Waternish, Isle of Skye The Waternish peninsula, one of the three most prominent in the north of Skye, juts into the Little Minch, with Loch Dunvegan on the west and Loch Snizort on the east. Most of the houses pictured are strung out along the single track road which overlooks Loch Bay, an inlet of Loch Dunvegan. Left of centre is the community of Stein. Stein began life as a British Fisheries planned village but it failed to develop as expected. Today it is a quiet and picturesque holiday destination for those seeking peace and quiet. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2315816&mime_type=&launchZoom=15816 Dunvegan Castle, Skye This illustration was taken from 'A Tour in Scotland' by Thomas Pennant. It shows Dunvegan Castle, situated on a rock, over Loch Dunvegan on the Isle of Skye. Partly modernised, the oldest part of the building is a square tower, possibly dating from the ninth century. It has been the seat of the Chiefs of Macleod for almost 800 years and is believed to be the oldest inhabited castle in Scotland http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2331150&mime_type=&launchZoom=31150 Dunvegan Castle Dunvegan Castle stands on the east shore of Loch Dunvegan, west of Portree on the Isle of Skye. The castle is the ancestral home of the Macleod clan and claims to be the oldest residence in Scotland continuously occupied by the same family. Parts of the castle date from the 9th century but each subsequent century has seen renovations and additions. The castle houses many precious clan artefacts. The most famous of these is the Fairy Flag. This was said to have been given to one of the chiefs by his wife who was a fairy. The flag is said to bring success to the clan if unfurled in time of dire need. The flag can be used three times and has so far been used twice, at the Battle of Glendale in 1490 and the Battle of Trumpan in 1578. This illustration is from 'The Antiquities of Scotland', volume 2, by Francis Grose, 1797 http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2331733&mime_type=&launchZoom=31733 Dunvegan Castle This postcard shows Dunvegan Castle on the Isle of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332090&mime_type=&launchZoom=32090 Dunvegan Castle, Skye This postcard shows Dunvegan Castle on the Isle of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332091&mime_type=&launchZoom=32091 Dunvegan Castle This postcard shows Dunvegan Castle on the Isle of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332092&mime_type=&launchZoom=32092 Dunvegan Castle, Skye This postcard shows Dunvegan Castle on the Isle of Skye. Almost totally surrounded by water, Dunvegan Castle is well-equipped to defend itself against attack. Seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods, the castle was started in the 15th century and added to in each century. Today it is a popular tourist attraction. Bound on three sides by rocky cliffs and the waters of Loch Dunvegan, and protected on the landward side by a deep-cut ditch, the castle was virtually invulnerable to attack. The only entrance was through the ancient sea-gate which faced into the loch. In 1748 the gate was superseded by a bridge spanning the ditch. The most distinctive structure at Dunvegan is the great keep, which dates back to the 14th century. It was the creation of Malcolm, the 3rd MacLeod chief. At over 15 metres tall and with 3 metre thick walls, the keep served as the dungeon tower and also contained vaulted basements, the great hall, private apartments, and bed chambers. The exterior turrets and observation tower are later additions. The only major repair to the keep has been the tower's re-roofing in 1790. At the opposite end of the eastern wing is situated the Fairy Tower, built c.1500 by Alasdair Crotach, the 8th chief. This was a purely residential tower. The name Fairy Tower most likely derives from the presence of the Fairy Flag, a relic of the clan's history. At least 1,000 years old, the Fairy Flag is said to be endowed with magical powers that have ensured the MacLeods presence at Dunvegan. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332107&mime_type=&launchZoom=32107 Panorama view of Dunvegan, Skye This postcard shows a panorama view of the village of Dunvegan, on the Isle of Skye. Once an important port, Dunvegan was a stopping off point for steamers travelling to the Western Isles. It also ran a daily service to Oban. Today the area is most famous for being home to Dunvegan Castle, seat of the chiefs of the MacLeods http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2332165&mime_type=&launchZoom=32165 The Loch, from the Hotel Dunvegan Skye The small village of Dunvegan, most famous as the location of Dunvegan Castle, seat of the Clan MacLeod, lies on the shore of Loch Dunvegan. The view pictured looks to the North, with Dunvegan Head in the far distance. Despite the many small islands and rocky inlets scattered along its inner shores, the loch was a regular port of call for steamers en route to the Western Isles from the mainland. http://www.ambaile.org.uk/en/search/do_quick_search.html?q=%2334119&mime_type=&launchZoom=34119