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TITLE
Confirmation of Royal Charter issued on 3 March 1369 (Back)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_2003_129_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
3 June 1373
PERIOD
1370s
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1032
KEYWORDS
charters
legal
law
documents
land rights
property rights
seals
burghs
Confirmation of Royal Charter issued on 3 March 1369 (Back)

In this confirmation dated Elgin, 3 June 1373, Alexander, Bishop of Moray, endorses an earlier Royal Charter, issued by David II on 3 March 1369. The charter grants lands, rights and privileges to the burgh of Inverness. The document is endorsed, 'a charter of ye Biscop of Murrew berand witnes of ye feftment of ye burch.'

The image shows the back of the document.

The endorsement confirms the burgh's holdings in the somewhat troubled times of the first Steward monarch, Robert II. Drakies became part of the common lands of the burgh to be used by the burgesses for pasturing cattle and sheep, the digging of peats, and the taking of turfs and heather for thatching. The payment days were Pentecost, a moveable feast, the 7th Sunday after Easter, and St. Martin in Winter, November 11th. They were the standard term days for payment in medieval and later Scotland.

As proof of the endorsement, the charter is recited at full length. In Charles Fraser-Mackintosh's 1875 publication, 'Invernessiana: Contributions Toward a History of the Town and Parish of Inverness, from 1160 to 1599' (p 69), the document is translated from the original Latin thus:

[For a glossary of some of the terms used in the Inverness burgh documents please follow the link towards the foot of this page]

'David, by the Grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men of his whole realm; Greeting: Know, that we have set, and in feu-farm let and granted for ever, to our faithful burgesses and the community of our burgh of Inverness, our whole burgh of Inverness, with the land of Drekeis, with the pertinents within the Sheriffdom of Inverness: To be had and held by the said community and burgesses and their heirs and successors for ever, in feu and heritage by all right marches and divisions within all the territory adjacent to said burgh, with fishings, mills, multures, and their sequels, with the toll and small custom of said burgh: Also with all other and sundry liberties, commodities, and easements, right customs, and just pertinents whatsoever, as well not named as named, belonging to foresaid burgh and foresaid lands, or which in future may in any way justly belong freely, quietly, fully, wholly, well, and in peace: Giving therefor to us and our heirs annually at the terms of Pentecost and St Martin in winter, by equal portions, eighty merks sterling; In testimony of which matter, to our present charter we command our Seal to be appended: Witnesses, the venerable fathers in Christ, William, Bishop of St Andrews, and Patrick, Bishop of Brechin, our Chancellor; Robert, Senescall of Scotland, our nephew; William, Earl of Douglas, Robert de Erskine, Archibald de Douglas, and William de Dishingtoun, knights. At Perth, the third day of March, in the year of our reign the fortieth.'

Accession Number: INVMG 2003.129

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Confirmation of Royal Charter issued on 3 March 1369 (Back)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1370s

charters; legal; law; documents; land rights; property rights; seals; burghs

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Inverness Burgh Documents (2)

In this confirmation dated Elgin, 3 June 1373, Alexander, Bishop of Moray, endorses an earlier Royal Charter, issued by David II on 3 March 1369. The charter grants lands, rights and privileges to the burgh of Inverness. The document is endorsed, 'a charter of ye Biscop of Murrew berand witnes of ye feftment of ye burch.' <br /> <br /> The image shows the back of the document.<br /> <br /> The endorsement confirms the burgh's holdings in the somewhat troubled times of the first Steward monarch, Robert II. Drakies became part of the common lands of the burgh to be used by the burgesses for pasturing cattle and sheep, the digging of peats, and the taking of turfs and heather for thatching. The payment days were Pentecost, a moveable feast, the 7th Sunday after Easter, and St. Martin in Winter, November 11th. They were the standard term days for payment in medieval and later Scotland.<br /> <br /> As proof of the endorsement, the charter is recited at full length. In Charles Fraser-Mackintosh's 1875 publication, 'Invernessiana: Contributions Toward a History of the Town and Parish of Inverness, from 1160 to 1599' (p 69), the document is translated from the original Latin thus:<br /> <br /> [For a glossary of some of the terms used in the Inverness burgh documents please follow the link towards the foot of this page]<br /> <br /> 'David, by the Grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men of his whole realm; Greeting: Know, that we have set, and in feu-farm let and granted for ever, to our faithful burgesses and the community of our burgh of Inverness, our whole burgh of Inverness, with the land of Drekeis, with the pertinents within the Sheriffdom of Inverness: To be had and held by the said community and burgesses and their heirs and successors for ever, in feu and heritage by all right marches and divisions within all the territory adjacent to said burgh, with fishings, mills, multures, and their sequels, with the toll and small custom of said burgh: Also with all other and sundry liberties, commodities, and easements, right customs, and just pertinents whatsoever, as well not named as named, belonging to foresaid burgh and foresaid lands, or which in future may in any way justly belong freely, quietly, fully, wholly, well, and in peace: Giving therefor to us and our heirs annually at the terms of Pentecost and St Martin in winter, by equal portions, eighty merks sterling; In testimony of which matter, to our present charter we command our Seal to be appended: Witnesses, the venerable fathers in Christ, William, Bishop of St Andrews, and Patrick, Bishop of Brechin, our Chancellor; Robert, Senescall of Scotland, our nephew; William, Earl of Douglas, Robert de Erskine, Archibald de Douglas, and William de Dishingtoun, knights. At Perth, the third day of March, in the year of our reign the fortieth.'<br /> <br /> Accession Number: INVMG 2003.129 <br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/?service=asset&action=show_zoom_window_popup&language=en&asset=708&location=grid&asset_list=19947,708&basket_item_id=undefined" target=”_blank”>Glossary</a>