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TITLE
Alexander II Charter Granting Land at Merkinch to Burgesses of Inverness, 1236 (Back)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_2003_132_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
26 July 1236
PERIOD
1230s
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1039
KEYWORDS
charters
legal
law
documents
land rights
property rights
seals
burghs
Alexander II Charter Granting Land at Merkinch to Burgesses of Inverness, 1236 (Back)

With this charter, dated 26 July 1236, Alexander II granted to the community of Inverness the lands of Merkinch as common land where the burgesses could graze their cattle and sheep, or take peat, timber and other materials for their use, free of charge. At this time Merkinch was an island.

The image shows the back of the document.

In return for the land the burgesses were charged a pound of pepper as rent. Pepper was a valuable commodity at the time. It was used as a spice and also to preserve meat and is an indication that Inverness had trading links with Europe and beyond.

Alexander granted this charter whilst staying in the royal castle of Inverness, when he may have also been responsible for the foundation of Inverness's Dominican Friary (Blackfriars). At about the same time he confirmed the endowments and privileges of his new monastic foundation at Pluscarden.

In Charles Fraser-Mackintosh's 1875 publication, 'Invernessiana: Contributions Toward a History of the Town and Parish of Inverness, from 1160 to 1599' (p 29), the document is translated from the original Latin thus:

[For a glossary of some of the terms used in the Inverness burgh documents please follow the link towards the foot of this page]

'Alexander, by the grace of God, King of Scots. To all good men of his whole land, clerical and laical; greeting: Know all present and to come, that we have given, granted, and by this our present charter confirmed to our burgesses of Inverness, the lands of Merkinch, for the support of the burgh of Inverness, to be held by the said burgesses of us and our heirs for ever, freely and quietly, for sustaining the rent of our burgh of Inverness, so that they may cultivate the said lands of Merkinch if they choose, or deal with it in any other way that may be for their advantage; rendering therefor one pound of pepper at the feast of St Michael yearly. Witnesses - Walter, son of Allan, Steward and Justiciar of Scotland: Edward (?) Earl of Angus; Edward (?) Earl of Caithness; Hugh de Vallibus; Walter Wynzett; Walter de Petyn; David Marischall, at Inverness, the twenty-sixth day of July, in the twenty-second year of the reign of the Lord the King.'

Accession Number: INVMG 2003.132

Glossary

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Alexander II Charter Granting Land at Merkinch to Burgesses of Inverness, 1236 (Back)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1230s

charters; legal; law; documents; land rights; property rights; seals; burghs

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Inverness Burgh Documents (2)

With this charter, dated 26 July 1236, Alexander II granted to the community of Inverness the lands of Merkinch as common land where the burgesses could graze their cattle and sheep, or take peat, timber and other materials for their use, free of charge. At this time Merkinch was an island.<br /> <br /> The image shows the back of the document.<br /> <br /> In return for the land the burgesses were charged a pound of pepper as rent. Pepper was a valuable commodity at the time. It was used as a spice and also to preserve meat and is an indication that Inverness had trading links with Europe and beyond.<br /> <br /> Alexander granted this charter whilst staying in the royal castle of Inverness, when he may have also been responsible for the foundation of Inverness's Dominican Friary (Blackfriars). At about the same time he confirmed the endowments and privileges of his new monastic foundation at Pluscarden.<br /> <br /> In Charles Fraser-Mackintosh's 1875 publication, 'Invernessiana: Contributions Toward a History of the Town and Parish of Inverness, from 1160 to 1599' (p 29), the document is translated from the original Latin thus:<br /> <br /> [For a glossary of some of the terms used in the Inverness burgh documents please follow the link towards the foot of this page]<br /> <br /> 'Alexander, by the grace of God, King of Scots. To all good men of his whole land, clerical and laical; greeting: Know all present and to come, that we have given, granted, and by this our present charter confirmed to our burgesses of Inverness, the lands of Merkinch, for the support of the burgh of Inverness, to be held by the said burgesses of us and our heirs for ever, freely and quietly, for sustaining the rent of our burgh of Inverness, so that they may cultivate the said lands of Merkinch if they choose, or deal with it in any other way that may be for their advantage; rendering therefor one pound of pepper at the feast of St Michael yearly. Witnesses - Walter, son of Allan, Steward and Justiciar of Scotland: Edward (?) Earl of Angus; Edward (?) Earl of Caithness; Hugh de Vallibus; Walter Wynzett; Walter de Petyn; David Marischall, at Inverness, the twenty-sixth day of July, in the twenty-second year of the reign of the Lord the King.'<br /> <br /> Accession Number: INVMG 2003.132 <br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.ambaile.org.uk/?service=asset&action=show_zoom_window_popup&language=en&asset=708&location=grid&asset_list=19947,708&basket_item_id=undefined" target=”_blank”>Glossary</a>