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TITLE
Loch Ard, near Aberfoyle
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_859_20_0611
PLACENAME
Loch Ard
DISTRICT
Perthshire - Western
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
PERTH
PERIOD
20c
CREATOR
M E M Donaldson
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
10529
KEYWORDS
Loch Ard
Trossachs
Aberfoyle
Rob Roy MacGregor
Jacobites
Battle of Killiecrankie
Balquhidder
Earl of Breadalbane
Duke of Montrose
Loch Ard, near Aberfoyle

Loch Ard is a freshwater loch, north of Loch Ard Forest in the Trossachs, near Aberfoyle. The area is associated with Rob Roy MacGregor (1671-1734). This view of Loch Ard, with houses and jetty, was photographed in the first half of the 20th century by M.E.M. Donaldson.

Raised as a Jacobite, Rob Roy took part in the Battle of Killiecrankie at the age of 18. After the MacGregor name was banned in 1694 he took his mother's name, Campbell. He was a skilled cattle dealer and held land in Balquhidder, Craigroyston and Inversnaid but was evicted after losing money borrowed from the Duke of Montrose. He rented land from the Earl of Breadalbane, a political enemy of Montrose, and engaged in cattle stealing and raiding Montrose's land.

During the 1715 Jacobite Rising Rob Roy was engaged in guerrilla warfare against the Government troops but because of his allegiances with the Campbells, who were Government supporters, he did not take part in the Battle of Sherrifmuir. Despite this he was wanted for High Treason. He lived as an outlaw until he surrendered to General Wade in 1725. He received a pardon from George I and lived peacefully until his death near Balquhidder in 1734. His fame was guaranteed by Daniel Defoe's book 'Highland Rogue' published in 1723 and by Sir Walter Scott's novel 'Rob Roy' published in 1818.

The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the North and West Highlands. 'Wanderings in the Western Highlands and Islands' and 'Further Wanderings - Mainly in Argyll' are two of her best known works and both are illustrated with her own photographs. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, and was buried in Oban


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Loch Ard, near Aberfoyle

PERTH

20c

Loch Ard; Trossachs; Aberfoyle; Rob Roy MacGregor; Jacobites; Battle of Killiecrankie; Balquhidder; Earl of Breadalbane; Duke of Montrose

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

M E M Donaldson Collection

Loch Ard is a freshwater loch, north of Loch Ard Forest in the Trossachs, near Aberfoyle. The area is associated with Rob Roy MacGregor (1671-1734). This view of Loch Ard, with houses and jetty, was photographed in the first half of the 20th century by M.E.M. Donaldson.<br /> <br /> Raised as a Jacobite, Rob Roy took part in the Battle of Killiecrankie at the age of 18. After the MacGregor name was banned in 1694 he took his mother's name, Campbell. He was a skilled cattle dealer and held land in Balquhidder, Craigroyston and Inversnaid but was evicted after losing money borrowed from the Duke of Montrose. He rented land from the Earl of Breadalbane, a political enemy of Montrose, and engaged in cattle stealing and raiding Montrose's land.<br /> <br /> During the 1715 Jacobite Rising Rob Roy was engaged in guerrilla warfare against the Government troops but because of his allegiances with the Campbells, who were Government supporters, he did not take part in the Battle of Sherrifmuir. Despite this he was wanted for High Treason. He lived as an outlaw until he surrendered to General Wade in 1725. He received a pardon from George I and lived peacefully until his death near Balquhidder in 1734. His fame was guaranteed by Daniel Defoe's book 'Highland Rogue' published in 1723 and by Sir Walter Scott's novel 'Rob Roy' published in 1818.<br /> <br /> The photographer, Mary Ethel Muir Donaldson, was born in 1876 and came to the Highlands around 1908. She travelled extensively around the North and West Highlands, writing and taking photographs. Between 1912 and 1949 she produced many books on the social history and customs of the North and West Highlands. 'Wanderings in the Western Highlands and Islands' and 'Further Wanderings - Mainly in Argyll' are two of her best known works and both are illustrated with her own photographs. She died in a nursing home in Edinburgh in 1958, and was buried in Oban <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.