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TITLE
Canadian War Brides (4 of 14)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CANADIAN_WAR_BRIDES_04
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Melynda Jarratt
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1102
KEYWORDS
Second World War
World War II
2nd World War
audios

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In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract Melynda talks about the arrival in Canada of the first British War Brides.

'In 1946 we have the largest influx of war brides coming into Canada. That year starting on February 5th, 1946, we had the first large, official movement of Canadian war brides departing on the Mauritania from Liverpool and arriving in Halifax three days later on February 9th. Imagine, it only took those 3-4 days. They left actually the 5th, sorry, and arrived on the 9th. Four days later they arrive in Canada and I, a friend of mine who was on that ship says she was, uuugh, uuugh, she was uuugh, and her stomach went up every time and she said it was a sickening sail and she never wanted to sail again.

Well, that was an experience that was quite common amongst the War Brides because many of them lost their sea legs the moment they got on the ship, and they only found them once they landed on shore again. And, you know, that was not very, it was, it was hard for these people because, you know, for the first time in five and six years they were surrounded by the most abundant, cornucopia of food; they have not seen white bread; they have not seen bananas and oranges and eggs? I mean, you know what the rationning was - anybody who lived during the war - one egg a month, is that what it was? Things like that. Well, hey, you could have four eggs for breakfast if you wanted. Bananas? Gorge on them! So, naturally that led to certain bouts of constipation and, and vom- and diarrhea and all kinds of things; the people got sick and also throwing up. And then there was the sea going up and up. And you can, you can just imagine the stories that come out of that.'

Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).

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Canadian War Brides (4 of 14)

2000s

Second World War; World War II; 2nd World War; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Canadian War Brides

In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract Melynda talks about the arrival in Canada of the first British War Brides.<br /> <br /> 'In 1946 we have the largest influx of war brides coming into Canada. That year starting on February 5th, 1946, we had the first large, official movement of Canadian war brides departing on the Mauritania from Liverpool and arriving in Halifax three days later on February 9th. Imagine, it only took those 3-4 days. They left actually the 5th, sorry, and arrived on the 9th. Four days later they arrive in Canada and I, a friend of mine who was on that ship says she was, uuugh, uuugh, she was uuugh, and her stomach went up every time and she said it was a sickening sail and she never wanted to sail again. <br /> <br /> Well, that was an experience that was quite common amongst the War Brides because many of them lost their sea legs the moment they got on the ship, and they only found them once they landed on shore again. And, you know, that was not very, it was, it was hard for these people because, you know, for the first time in five and six years they were surrounded by the most abundant, cornucopia of food; they have not seen white bread; they have not seen bananas and oranges and eggs? I mean, you know what the rationning was - anybody who lived during the war - one egg a month, is that what it was? Things like that. Well, hey, you could have four eggs for breakfast if you wanted. Bananas? Gorge on them! So, naturally that led to certain bouts of constipation and, and vom- and diarrhea and all kinds of things; the people got sick and also throwing up. And then there was the sea going up and up. And you can, you can just imagine the stories that come out of that.'<br /> <br /> Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).<br /> <br /> Find out more about the <A HREF=" http://www.canadianwarbrides.com/"target="_blank">Canadian War Brides</A>