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TITLE
Canadian War Brides (9 of 14)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CANADIAN_WAR_BRIDES_09
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Melynda Jarratt
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1110
KEYWORDS
Second World War
World War II
2nd World War
audios

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In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract Melynda answers a question from a member of the audience on the subject of Gaelic-speaking brides.

'Did you ever come across any War Brides who were Gaelic speakers? I mean, they probably all spoke English too, but any girls from the Islands or from Gaelic-speaking Highland areas?

I, I personally have not myself. Not, it's not because they don't exist, I am sure they certainly were, because in Cape Breton - that's another War Bride story - ah, Mrs Black, from Cape Breton. She, I believe she probably spoke Gaelic, yes. Ah, she's in my book. Ah, she was from, oh jeez, I'd have to look, um, the stories start blending together, I have to remind myself. But yes, I'm sure there were, because Cape Breton of course had a large contingent of Gaelic speakers.

And, in fact, in my province there is a small Gaelic speaking constituency and it's very small but you have to start somewhere. And, and, right off the top of my hat, no I can't name any but I'm sure that there were and I do hope that those children have learned the language that their mothers spoke. And if they did, it would have been like anything else. If there are other speakers around you are going to speak it and, ah, if you're all by yourself the language gets lost. So I would suspect that in areas like Cape Breton and also in the southern townships of Ontario. I have a friend who's from Ballachulish and his mother, his father married a War Bride, and they ended up - he was a Gaelic speaker and my friend spoke Gaelic - so actually yes! Ontario, yes, in a place called Euphemia Township.'

Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).

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Canadian War Brides (9 of 14)

2000s

Second World War; World War II; 2nd World War; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Canadian War Brides

In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract Melynda answers a question from a member of the audience on the subject of Gaelic-speaking brides.<br /> <br /> 'Did you ever come across any War Brides who were Gaelic speakers? I mean, they probably all spoke English too, but any girls from the Islands or from Gaelic-speaking Highland areas? <br /> <br /> I, I personally have not myself. Not, it's not because they don't exist, I am sure they certainly were, because in Cape Breton - that's another War Bride story - ah, Mrs Black, from Cape Breton. She, I believe she probably spoke Gaelic, yes. Ah, she's in my book. Ah, she was from, oh jeez, I'd have to look, um, the stories start blending together, I have to remind myself. But yes, I'm sure there were, because Cape Breton of course had a large contingent of Gaelic speakers. <br /> <br /> And, in fact, in my province there is a small Gaelic speaking constituency and it's very small but you have to start somewhere. And, and, right off the top of my hat, no I can't name any but I'm sure that there were and I do hope that those children have learned the language that their mothers spoke. And if they did, it would have been like anything else. If there are other speakers around you are going to speak it and, ah, if you're all by yourself the language gets lost. So I would suspect that in areas like Cape Breton and also in the southern townships of Ontario. I have a friend who's from Ballachulish and his mother, his father married a War Bride, and they ended up - he was a Gaelic speaker and my friend spoke Gaelic - so actually yes! Ontario, yes, in a place called Euphemia Township.'<br /> <br /> Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).<br /> <br /> Find out more about the <A HREF=" http://www.canadianwarbrides.com/"target="_blank">Canadian War Brides</A>