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TITLE
Canadian War Brides (12 of 14)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CANADIAN_WAR_BRIDES_12
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Melynda Jarratt
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1115
KEYWORDS
Second World War
World War II
2nd World War
audios

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In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract, Zoe tells the story of Isabella Anderson.

'Living in a rural area, in the days before Medicare, meant that most of Isabella's babies were delivered at home by itinerant midwives when the country doctor couldn't make it to their house on time. She remembers the night that baby number five was born:

'Mrs Quinn, my good neighbour, never saw a baby being born before and the baby didn't wait for the doctor to arrive. I can picture Mrs Quinn yet, by the window with her prayer beads. Doctor Percy Lousier just charged us half price as he was too late.'

[Laughter]

'The following year another little lad arrived. Once again, Mrs Quinn was with me and she called the doctor and he came.'

Despite the fond memories, Isabella's life wasn't easy. A devastating fire destroyed the old homestead and all their possessions when the youngest child was just two years old. Then Weldon died unexpectedly, leaving her with a large family to take care of on her own. But Isabella's recollections of coming to New Brunswick paint a blissful scene of a self-sufficient rural life with its seasonal ebbs and flows that has largely disappeared from modern society.

'We always had plenty to eat. Weldon was a great hunter, never shot and trapped more than we needed. He used to poach salmon and salt them in the big barrel, enough to do all winter. It was always fish on Fridays. We always had a couple of pigs running around the yard. In winter, after they were slaughtered, we'd hang them in the barn. Lots of hens for eggs and green vegetables in the summer. Plus, we picked blueberries, raspberries, strawberries for jams and pies and we were never hungry when the snow whistled around the house.'

Isabella Anderson's experiences are typical of many war brides, both British and European who settled in New Brunswick.

'I've had many ups and downs,' she said matter-of-factly, 'but all in all I've had a very happy and contented life in Canada.'

Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).

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Canadian War Brides (12 of 14)

2000s

Second World War; World War II; 2nd World War; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Canadian War Brides

In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract, Zoe tells the story of Isabella Anderson.<br /> <br /> 'Living in a rural area, in the days before Medicare, meant that most of Isabella's babies were delivered at home by itinerant midwives when the country doctor couldn't make it to their house on time. She remembers the night that baby number five was born: <br /> <br /> 'Mrs Quinn, my good neighbour, never saw a baby being born before and the baby didn't wait for the doctor to arrive. I can picture Mrs Quinn yet, by the window with her prayer beads. Doctor Percy Lousier just charged us half price as he was too late.' <br /> <br /> [Laughter] <br /> <br /> 'The following year another little lad arrived. Once again, Mrs Quinn was with me and she called the doctor and he came.' <br /> <br /> Despite the fond memories, Isabella's life wasn't easy. A devastating fire destroyed the old homestead and all their possessions when the youngest child was just two years old. Then Weldon died unexpectedly, leaving her with a large family to take care of on her own. But Isabella's recollections of coming to New Brunswick paint a blissful scene of a self-sufficient rural life with its seasonal ebbs and flows that has largely disappeared from modern society. <br /> <br /> 'We always had plenty to eat. Weldon was a great hunter, never shot and trapped more than we needed. He used to poach salmon and salt them in the big barrel, enough to do all winter. It was always fish on Fridays. We always had a couple of pigs running around the yard. In winter, after they were slaughtered, we'd hang them in the barn. Lots of hens for eggs and green vegetables in the summer. Plus, we picked blueberries, raspberries, strawberries for jams and pies and we were never hungry when the snow whistled around the house.' <br /> <br /> Isabella Anderson's experiences are typical of many war brides, both British and European who settled in New Brunswick. <br /> <br /> 'I've had many ups and downs,' she said matter-of-factly, 'but all in all I've had a very happy and contented life in Canada.'<br /> <br /> Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).<br /> <br /> Find out more about the <A HREF=" http://www.canadianwarbrides.com/"target="_blank">Canadian War Brides</A>