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TITLE
Charles Fraser-Mackintosh
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_25_IV
PLACENAME
unidentified
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11159
KEYWORDS
Charles Fraser-Mackintosh
Donald Davidson
Hugh Rose
George Grant Mackay
Inverness Public Library
Union Street
personalitiesed
Charles Fraser-Mackintosh

Charles Fraser-Mackintosh was born at Dochgarroch, near Inverness, in 1828. Opting for a legal career at the age of 14, he worked for John Mackay of Inverness for seven years. In 1849, he decided to continue his legal studies at Edinburgh University, and at the age of 25, he started up his own business in Inverness. He became assistant to the Sherriff Clerk and in 1853, procurator. He became interested in politics, and in 1857 he was elected as a Town Councillor in Inverness.

He and his associates Donald Davidson, Hugh Rose and George Grant Mackay realised that the coming of the railway would provide the opportunity for expansion, growth and prosperity in Inverness. They began a scheme to clear the old buildings between the Railway Station and Church Street, and work was started on building Union Street. The street was finished in 1864. Fraser-Mackintosh also bought and developed the Drummond Estate and land in the Ballifeary area.

In 1874, he was elected Member of Parliament for Inverness. He put forward a list of legislative reforms supporting the cause of Highland tenantry.

He retired from politics in 1892, and spent the rest of his life in pursuit of historical and literary studies. He died in Bournemouth in 1901, and after his wife's death in 1920, his extensive collection of books on the history and culture of the Highlands was donated to Inverness Public Library


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Charles Fraser-Mackintosh

Charles Fraser-Mackintosh; Donald Davidson; Hugh Rose; George Grant Mackay; Inverness Public Library; Union Street; personalitiesed

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection

Charles Fraser-Mackintosh was born at Dochgarroch, near Inverness, in 1828. Opting for a legal career at the age of 14, he worked for John Mackay of Inverness for seven years. In 1849, he decided to continue his legal studies at Edinburgh University, and at the age of 25, he started up his own business in Inverness. He became assistant to the Sherriff Clerk and in 1853, procurator. He became interested in politics, and in 1857 he was elected as a Town Councillor in Inverness.<br /> <br /> He and his associates Donald Davidson, Hugh Rose and George Grant Mackay realised that the coming of the railway would provide the opportunity for expansion, growth and prosperity in Inverness. They began a scheme to clear the old buildings between the Railway Station and Church Street, and work was started on building Union Street. The street was finished in 1864. Fraser-Mackintosh also bought and developed the Drummond Estate and land in the Ballifeary area. <br /> <br /> In 1874, he was elected Member of Parliament for Inverness. He put forward a list of legislative reforms supporting the cause of Highland tenantry. <br /> <br /> He retired from politics in 1892, and spent the rest of his life in pursuit of historical and literary studies. He died in Bournemouth in 1901, and after his wife's death in 1920, his extensive collection of books on the history and culture of the Highlands was donated to Inverness Public Library <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.