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TITLE
Canadian War Brides (13 of 14)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CANADIAN_WAR_BRIDES_13
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Melynda Jarratt
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1116
KEYWORDS
Second World War
World War II
2nd World War
audios

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In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract, Zoe relates her own experiences.

'As Melynda said I was a little tired of waiting. I had been in service while my husband was overseas and I was up at Evanton, I was at the airfield there, and so I know this part of the country quite well. But when I, I had very, I had been working after I got out of the service, and I had been working and we'd written back and forth - you didn't telephone in those days and there was no texting or anything like that - but I had to have a written proposal of marriage to prove that I had somewhere to come, which was all very exciting, I wish I'd kept it.

But I, on a Tuesday I was working - I worked for my mother who was a milliner and, which I was too - and on the Tuesday, the travel agent called me and he said I've got a flight for you on Thursday. Now, could you get ready in two days to go that far away? And I could only take a small, soft bag of clothes. So, my mother said to me, 'Finish what you're doing and go home and pack.' And she never questioned me going or, 'I don't want you to go' or, 'I do want you to go', which I look back and think must've been very difficult for her.

So I did that and I went home and I got a trunk on the way home and I put my clothes in it. And it was all very exciting and I burned all my love letters and pictures and, which maybe I shouldn't have done but you were not allowed to bring that, it was excess baggage. And on the Wednesday, on the Wednesday my family came and said goodbye to me and all my friends. And on the Wednesday night, my mother and I and a friend drove me to Prestwick Airport where we were meant to fly on the - So I had to stay overnight and it was in a Nissan Hut, just like the soldiers had been in; first of the motels.

So we stayed there and on the Thursday morning they said the flight had been cancelled because there was twelve feet of snow in Gander. So that was - had to stay another night. So on the Friday we set off, but there was still snow at Gander which hadn't been cleared and we went to the Azores, spent the night in the Azores, and, which was very exciting really because I hadn't, I don't know if you remember how much food there was during the war but I, we didn't have too much. Of course in the service there was enough, but we had a seven course meal and I always remember the dessert was a piece of pineapple, slice of pineapple and it looked that big, but it was lovely.

And then the next day we got up and we flew to Newfoundland; they put us in a hotel and we rested there, and then that evening we went into Montreal, and it was meant, you were meant to be eight hours crossing the Atlantic and four hours to Montreal. So, as we came into Montreal - of course you could see the ocean all the way over, it wasn't like it is today, you could look down and see the sea - and as we flew into Montreal there was a neon sign and it was of the Rampant Lion? And it must have been an advertisement, I don't know, but that was what I, that was the first thing I saw as I went, and I thought that was a good sign because I was coming from it, and I was going to it. And I landed in Montreal at one in the morning and there was no one to meet me. Seven of us, and I thought, 'Uh-oh, he's changed his mind.'

Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).

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Canadian War Brides (13 of 14)

2000s

Second World War; World War II; 2nd World War; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Canadian War Brides

In July 2009, Melynda Jarratt, the leading expert on Canadian War Brides, gave a talk on her subject at Dingwall Library. She was accompanied by Zoe Boone, a Canadian War Bride from Aberdeen. In this audio extract, Zoe relates her own experiences.<br /> <br /> 'As Melynda said I was a little tired of waiting. I had been in service while my husband was overseas and I was up at Evanton, I was at the airfield there, and so I know this part of the country quite well. But when I, I had very, I had been working after I got out of the service, and I had been working and we'd written back and forth - you didn't telephone in those days and there was no texting or anything like that - but I had to have a written proposal of marriage to prove that I had somewhere to come, which was all very exciting, I wish I'd kept it. <br /> <br /> But I, on a Tuesday I was working - I worked for my mother who was a milliner and, which I was too - and on the Tuesday, the travel agent called me and he said I've got a flight for you on Thursday. Now, could you get ready in two days to go that far away? And I could only take a small, soft bag of clothes. So, my mother said to me, 'Finish what you're doing and go home and pack.' And she never questioned me going or, 'I don't want you to go' or, 'I do want you to go', which I look back and think must've been very difficult for her. <br /> <br /> So I did that and I went home and I got a trunk on the way home and I put my clothes in it. And it was all very exciting and I burned all my love letters and pictures and, which maybe I shouldn't have done but you were not allowed to bring that, it was excess baggage. And on the Wednesday, on the Wednesday my family came and said goodbye to me and all my friends. And on the Wednesday night, my mother and I and a friend drove me to Prestwick Airport where we were meant to fly on the - So I had to stay overnight and it was in a Nissan Hut, just like the soldiers had been in; first of the motels. <br /> <br /> So we stayed there and on the Thursday morning they said the flight had been cancelled because there was twelve feet of snow in Gander. So that was - had to stay another night. So on the Friday we set off, but there was still snow at Gander which hadn't been cleared and we went to the Azores, spent the night in the Azores, and, which was very exciting really because I hadn't, I don't know if you remember how much food there was during the war but I, we didn't have too much. Of course in the service there was enough, but we had a seven course meal and I always remember the dessert was a piece of pineapple, slice of pineapple and it looked that big, but it was lovely. <br /> <br /> And then the next day we got up and we flew to Newfoundland; they put us in a hotel and we rested there, and then that evening we went into Montreal, and it was meant, you were meant to be eight hours crossing the Atlantic and four hours to Montreal. So, as we came into Montreal - of course you could see the ocean all the way over, it wasn't like it is today, you could look down and see the sea - and as we flew into Montreal there was a neon sign and it was of the Rampant Lion? And it must have been an advertisement, I don't know, but that was what I, that was the first thing I saw as I went, and I thought that was a good sign because I was coming from it, and I was going to it. And I landed in Montreal at one in the morning and there was no one to meet me. Seven of us, and I thought, 'Uh-oh, he's changed his mind.'<br /> <br /> Melynda Jarratt lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. She has been researching Canadian War Brides since 1987 when she began working on her thesis at the University of New Brunswick. She has published various books on the subject including 'War Brides (2007) and 'Captured Hearts' (2008).<br /> <br /> Find out more about the <A HREF=" http://www.canadianwarbrides.com/"target="_blank">Canadian War Brides</A>