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TITLE
2nd (Militia) Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, 1885
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_130
PLACENAME
Muir of Ord
DISTRICT
Muir of Ord
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Urray
DATE OF IMAGE
1885
PERIOD
1880s
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11223
KEYWORDS
Highland Militia
Muir or Ord
Militia Act
Crimean War
Indian Mutiny
Seaforth Highlander
2nd (Militia) Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, 1885

The photograph shows the 2nd (Militia) Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders training at Muir of Ord in 1885. The battalion originated as the Inverness, Banff, Elgin and Nairn Militia, being authorised by the Scotch Militia Act of 1802. During the Napoleonic Wars it was embodied for home service, but after the French war it was seldom called out for training. However it proved its worth once again during the Crimean War when the Regular Army faced acute recruiting problems.

In 1855 the Inverness Militia was re-designated as the 76th (Highland Light Infantry) Militia with the Master of Lovat as the Commanding Officer. He remained in command until his death in 1887, by which time he had succeeded his father as the 15th Lord Lovat in 1875, and the 76th Militia had become The 2nd (Militia) Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders under the Army Reforms of 1881. Under Lord Lovat's command the battalion held its annual camp at the Muir of Ord, where the ground was suitable for camping and drill, and there was a range suitable for musketry. Muir of Ord was also conveniently near to the Colonel's home at Beaufort Castle!

The photograph shows the battalion in square, with the Colonel and his staff, the Colours and the Bands in the centre. It was a defensive formation used against an enemy such as the tribesmen faced by the 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders on the Egyptian-Sudanese border at the time, but long out-dated on the Continent of Europe. In 1893 the Militia were issued with the new Lee Metford rifle, and the musketry range at Muir of Ord was declared unsafe, and annual training had to be transferred to the more up to date rifle ranges at Fort George.

(This information was kindly supplied by the Regimental Museum of The Highlanders, Fort George).


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For further information about purchasing and prices please email the
Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

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2nd (Militia) Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, 1885

ROSS: Urray

1880s

Highland Militia; Muir or Ord; Militia Act; Crimean War; Indian Mutiny; Seaforth Highlander

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection

The photograph shows the 2nd (Militia) Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders training at Muir of Ord in 1885. The battalion originated as the Inverness, Banff, Elgin and Nairn Militia, being authorised by the Scotch Militia Act of 1802. During the Napoleonic Wars it was embodied for home service, but after the French war it was seldom called out for training. However it proved its worth once again during the Crimean War when the Regular Army faced acute recruiting problems. <br /> <br /> In 1855 the Inverness Militia was re-designated as the 76th (Highland Light Infantry) Militia with the Master of Lovat as the Commanding Officer. He remained in command until his death in 1887, by which time he had succeeded his father as the 15th Lord Lovat in 1875, and the 76th Militia had become The 2nd (Militia) Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders under the Army Reforms of 1881. Under Lord Lovat's command the battalion held its annual camp at the Muir of Ord, where the ground was suitable for camping and drill, and there was a range suitable for musketry. Muir of Ord was also conveniently near to the Colonel's home at Beaufort Castle! <br /> <br /> The photograph shows the battalion in square, with the Colonel and his staff, the Colours and the Bands in the centre. It was a defensive formation used against an enemy such as the tribesmen faced by the 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders on the Egyptian-Sudanese border at the time, but long out-dated on the Continent of Europe. In 1893 the Militia were issued with the new Lee Metford rifle, and the musketry range at Muir of Ord was declared unsafe, and annual training had to be transferred to the more up to date rifle ranges at Fort George.<br /> <br /> (This information was kindly supplied by the Regimental Museum of The Highlanders, Fort George). <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.