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TITLE
John Menzies Bookstall, Inverness Station
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_190
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11260
KEYWORDS
railway stations
shops
Inverness
John Menzies
Charles Dickens
Sobieski Stuart
World War I
First World War
John Menzies Bookstall, Inverness Station

John Menzies bookstall at Inverness station. The station was designed by the Highland Railway engineer Joseph Mitchell and built in 1855 when the line to Nairn was opened.

John Menzies opened his first bookshop at 61 Princes Street, Edinburgh in 1833. Using connections formed when working for London publisher Charles Tilt, he established a wholesale book department and became the Scottish agent for many English publishing houses. The success, in 1837, of Chapman & Hall's monthly installments of Charles Dickens' first novel, 'The Pickwick Papers', allowed the expansion of both his retail and wholesale businesses. In the 1840s he branched out into publishing with the most notable title, 'Costumes of the Clans' by Sobieski Stuart, published to commemorate the centenary of the '45.

In 1855 he expanded his empire to include newspaper distribution and, two years later, approached the boards of the Scottish railway companies with a view to operating bookstalls at the larger stations to capitalise on railway mania and the popularity of the halfpenny press. Initially, the revenues generated by these bookstalls was not large, in 1860, station bookstalls were providing 13.6% of the company's £27, 416 turnover, but they were vital strategic outposts


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John Menzies Bookstall, Inverness Station

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1910s

railway stations; shops; Inverness; John Menzies; Charles Dickens; Sobieski Stuart; World War I; First World War

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection

John Menzies bookstall at Inverness station. The station was designed by the Highland Railway engineer Joseph Mitchell and built in 1855 when the line to Nairn was opened.<br /> <br /> John Menzies opened his first bookshop at 61 Princes Street, Edinburgh in 1833. Using connections formed when working for London publisher Charles Tilt, he established a wholesale book department and became the Scottish agent for many English publishing houses. The success, in 1837, of Chapman & Hall's monthly installments of Charles Dickens' first novel, 'The Pickwick Papers', allowed the expansion of both his retail and wholesale businesses. In the 1840s he branched out into publishing with the most notable title, 'Costumes of the Clans' by Sobieski Stuart, published to commemorate the centenary of the '45.<br /> <br /> In 1855 he expanded his empire to include newspaper distribution and, two years later, approached the boards of the Scottish railway companies with a view to operating bookstalls at the larger stations to capitalise on railway mania and the popularity of the halfpenny press. Initially, the revenues generated by these bookstalls was not large, in 1860, station bookstalls were providing 13.6% of the company's £27, 416 turnover, but they were vital strategic outposts <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.