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TITLE
The 'Glengarry' on Loch Ness
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_413
PLACENAME
Loch Ness
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11376
KEYWORDS
boats
Caledonian Canal
cargo ships
ferries
Caledonian MacBrayne
Lochs
ferry boats
The 'Glengarry' on Loch Ness

Commencing in 1847, the 'Edinburgh Castle' (later re-named 'Glengarry') plied the Caledonian Canal for eighty years sailing the 66 miles from Banavie Hotel, near Fort William, through the Caledonian Canal linking Loch Lochy, Loch Oich and Loch Ness, to Dochgarroch, a little south of Inverness. She had been built in 1844 and sold to the Shipping empire of Messrs G & J Burns in 1846.

On 13 February 1851 Messrs Burns sold their fleet of West Highland steamships to a partnership of David Hutcheson, who had been managing them for some time, his brother Alexander, and the Messrs Burns' nephew, David MacBrayne. Their fleet comprised eight ocean-going paddle steamers and two track boats on the Crinan Canal.

The success of the Banavie to Inverness route led to the introduction of a second ship, the 'Gondolier', in 1866, designed specifically for working in and out of canal locks. In the 1870s the 'Edinburgh Castle' was lengthened, provided with saloons and given a new name - 'Glengarry'. The volume of passenger, cargo and mail on the Banavie to Inverness route continued to increase and a third ship had to be introduced in 1877. From 1895 the 'Glengarry' was placed on the Loch Ness mail run from Fort Augustus to Inverness where she remained until her last run on 29 October 1927 and was broken up three months later. At 83 she was the oldest steamship in the world


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The 'Glengarry' on Loch Ness

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

boats; Caledonian Canal; cargo ships; ferries; Caledonian MacBrayne; Lochs; ferry boats

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection

Commencing in 1847, the 'Edinburgh Castle' (later re-named 'Glengarry') plied the Caledonian Canal for eighty years sailing the 66 miles from Banavie Hotel, near Fort William, through the Caledonian Canal linking Loch Lochy, Loch Oich and Loch Ness, to Dochgarroch, a little south of Inverness. She had been built in 1844 and sold to the Shipping empire of Messrs G & J Burns in 1846.<br /> <br /> On 13 February 1851 Messrs Burns sold their fleet of West Highland steamships to a partnership of David Hutcheson, who had been managing them for some time, his brother Alexander, and the Messrs Burns' nephew, David MacBrayne. Their fleet comprised eight ocean-going paddle steamers and two track boats on the Crinan Canal.<br /> <br /> The success of the Banavie to Inverness route led to the introduction of a second ship, the 'Gondolier', in 1866, designed specifically for working in and out of canal locks. In the 1870s the 'Edinburgh Castle' was lengthened, provided with saloons and given a new name - 'Glengarry'. The volume of passenger, cargo and mail on the Banavie to Inverness route continued to increase and a third ship had to be introduced in 1877. From 1895 the 'Glengarry' was placed on the Loch Ness mail run from Fort Augustus to Inverness where she remained until her last run on 29 October 1927 and was broken up three months later. At 83 she was the oldest steamship in the world <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.