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TITLE
Lord George Murray
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_680
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11421
KEYWORDS
Lord George Murray
John Murray
Duke of Atholl
Prince Charles Edward Stuart
Battle of Culloden
Jacobites
Lord George Murray

Photograph of an illustration of Lord George Murray. Born in 1694 to John Murray, the first Duke of Atholl, he took part in both the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite Risings. Although a loyal supporter and commander to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, Murray predicted the folly of the 1745 Rising.

In reference to Culloden Moor, he was later to have written, "There could never be a more improper ground for Highlanders". This is because the moor was a flat expanse of land, highly unsuitable for the Scots' style of combat, but perfect for the artillary of the opposition. After the failure of the Rising, he escaped from Britain and died in Holland in 1760


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Lord George Murray

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

Lord George Murray; John Murray; Duke of Atholl; Prince Charles Edward Stuart; Battle of Culloden; Jacobites

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection (illustrations)

Photograph of an illustration of Lord George Murray. Born in 1694 to John Murray, the first Duke of Atholl, he took part in both the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite Risings. Although a loyal supporter and commander to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, Murray predicted the folly of the 1745 Rising.<br /> <br /> In reference to Culloden Moor, he was later to have written, "There could never be a more improper ground for Highlanders". This is because the moor was a flat expanse of land, highly unsuitable for the Scots' style of combat, but perfect for the artillary of the opposition. After the failure of the Rising, he escaped from Britain and died in Holland in 1760 <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.