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TITLE
View of St. Kilda, from the minister's garden
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_715
PLACENAME
St Kilda
DISTRICT
Harris
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Harris
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11444
KEYWORDS
St. Kilda
Outer Hebrides
Dun
Hirta
Soay
Boreray
Neil Mackenzie
evacuation
seabird colonys
seabirds
kildaed
View of St. Kilda, from the minister's garden

A view of St. Kilda, from the minister's garden.

St Kilda is the remotest part of the British Isles and consists of four islands- Dun, Hirta, Soay and Boreray. Situated in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, the village in the photograph was located on the main island of Hirta. Laid out by the Minister Neil Mackenzie, in the 1830s, the settlement took the shape of a crescent of houses, with the Manse and the church, down by the shore. The newer houses in the photograph were built in the 1860s to replace the older thatched buildings, which were eventually used as barns and byres for the cattle.

Having little contact with the mainland until the middle of the 19th century, the islanders were self-sufficient, paying rent through produce from the land such as oats, barley, fish and seabirds. As St. Kilda had no roads, produce was carried on the islanders' backs and they used small boats to travel back and fore between the islands.

By the middle of the 19th century, there was increasing contact with the mainland and with the introduction of summer crusies to the island, tourists began to visit St. Kilda. This increased contact with the mainland was eventually to lead to the gradual loss of self-sufficiency and the islanders began to rely on imports of food and fuel. In 1852, 36 islanders emigrated to Australia, beginning the decline of the St.Kilda population. In 1930, with the islanders feeling increasingly isolated from the outside world, the last of the inhabitants on the island were voluntarily evacuated to the mainland.

Today, St. Kilda is Europe's most important seabird colony and the layout of the 19th century village is still in existence


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For further information about purchasing and prices please email the
Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

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View of St. Kilda, from the minister's garden

INVERNESS: Harris

St. Kilda; Outer Hebrides; Dun; Hirta; Soay; Boreray; Neil Mackenzie; evacuation; seabird colonys; seabirds; kildaed

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection

A view of St. Kilda, from the minister's garden.<br /> <br /> St Kilda is the remotest part of the British Isles and consists of four islands- Dun, Hirta, Soay and Boreray. Situated in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, the village in the photograph was located on the main island of Hirta. Laid out by the Minister Neil Mackenzie, in the 1830s, the settlement took the shape of a crescent of houses, with the Manse and the church, down by the shore. The newer houses in the photograph were built in the 1860s to replace the older thatched buildings, which were eventually used as barns and byres for the cattle.<br /> <br /> Having little contact with the mainland until the middle of the 19th century, the islanders were self-sufficient, paying rent through produce from the land such as oats, barley, fish and seabirds. As St. Kilda had no roads, produce was carried on the islanders' backs and they used small boats to travel back and fore between the islands.<br /> <br /> By the middle of the 19th century, there was increasing contact with the mainland and with the introduction of summer crusies to the island, tourists began to visit St. Kilda. This increased contact with the mainland was eventually to lead to the gradual loss of self-sufficiency and the islanders began to rely on imports of food and fuel. In 1852, 36 islanders emigrated to Australia, beginning the decline of the St.Kilda population. In 1930, with the islanders feeling increasingly isolated from the outside world, the last of the inhabitants on the island were voluntarily evacuated to the mainland.<br /> <br /> Today, St. Kilda is Europe's most important seabird colony and the layout of the 19th century village is still in existence <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.