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TITLE
Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (1 of 12)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CROMARTY_FISHERS_JAMES_HOGG_01
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
James Hogg
SOURCE
James Hogg
ASSET ID
1150
KEYWORDS
herring fishing
villages
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers the types of fishing boats that were used in Cromarty.

All Ah remember about the fishing industry ye know, an the class of boats that they use - the first boats that they used for the herring fishing they call them the Scaffs, Scaffie. An the next class of boats that came after that wis the Zulus an the Fifie. An then after that they came the steam drifter. But before the steam drifter time came, they put engines into the Zulus, what they called Beccles boilers, Beccles engines, a standing boiler. It hid about eighty pound o steam, just enough to raise the mast an all the nets, at that time.

Well the nets wis, eh, generally sixty nets in a boat. But to go back further than that the nets wis hauled with a, first one that I know, wis a net, a capstan called the 'iron wifie'. It hid two burls on it, an you jist took the rope on one burl an over the other with the handle, yeh. Well the other one was a bit of an improvement, what they called the 'iron man'. At hid three burls. See? Like that. It wis the last of the, the iron work before the steam caipstit, steam capstan.

Well, the boats that time, the Scaffies, wis about thirty-five to thirty-eight feet o keel. The largest one that wis in the Moray Firth at that time, wis belonged to this place here, Cromarty, called the 'Successor'. An master an owner is John Hossack. Well, the Zulu boats wis about forty-five to fifty-five feet o keel. An they, they use the Beccles boilers for tae haul the nets.

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Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (1 of 12)

ROSS: Cromarty

1960s

herring fishing; villages; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

James Hogg

Am Baile: Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats

In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers the types of fishing boats that were used in Cromarty.<br /> <br /> All Ah remember about the fishing industry ye know, an the class of boats that they use - the first boats that they used for the herring fishing they call them the Scaffs, Scaffie. An the next class of boats that came after that wis the Zulus an the Fifie. An then after that they came the steam drifter. But before the steam drifter time came, they put engines into the Zulus, what they called Beccles boilers, Beccles engines, a standing boiler. It hid about eighty pound o steam, just enough to raise the mast an all the nets, at that time. <br /> <br /> Well the nets wis, eh, generally sixty nets in a boat. But to go back further than that the nets wis hauled with a, first one that I know, wis a net, a capstan called the 'iron wifie'. It hid two burls on it, an you jist took the rope on one burl an over the other with the handle, yeh. Well the other one was a bit of an improvement, what they called the 'iron man'. At hid three burls. See? Like that. It wis the last of the, the iron work before the steam caipstit, steam capstan. <br /> <br /> Well, the boats that time, the Scaffies, wis about thirty-five to thirty-eight feet o keel. The largest one that wis in the Moray Firth at that time, wis belonged to this place here, Cromarty, called the 'Successor'. An master an owner is John Hossack. Well, the Zulu boats wis about forty-five to fifty-five feet o keel. An they, they use the Beccles boilers for tae haul the nets.