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TITLE
Ferry Boat Approaching South Kessock, 1920s
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_XI_11
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11503
KEYWORDS
ferries
ferry boats
villages
strait
straits
monasteries
monk
monks
missionaries
pedestrian
pedestrians
bridges
ferry boats
Ferry Boat Approaching South Kessock, 1920s

This is the old ferry pier at South Kessock with the ferry boat almost alongside. The village of North Kessock lies across the narrow stretch of water which marks the meeting of the Moray and Beauly Firths. The Kessock Ferry was an ancient water route between Inverness and the Black Isle. It was frequently used by local farmers and others wishing to avoid the long journey round the head of the Beauly Firth.

The village of North Kessock is thought to have existed at least since the 1430s, when the Dominican monastery at Inverness was given permission to operate a ferry to the Black Isle. The name 'Kessock' derives from St Kessog, an Irish missionary. The village was developed during the early part of the nineteenth century on land owned by Sir William Fettes.

Fettes bought the estate of Redcastle for £135,000 in 1825. This purchase included the rights to operate the ferry at Kessock. Within three years he had introduced steam-powered boats on the route and built new piers at both North Kessock and South Kessock. The Ferry was privately run until 1939, when Inverness Town Council and Ross and Cromarty County Council took control of the service. Only foot passengers could be carried until the late 1940s, when a vehicle ferry was introduced. The ferry service ended in 1982 with the opening of the Kessock Bridge.


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Ferry Boat Approaching South Kessock, 1920s

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1920s

ferries; ferry boats; villages; strait; straits; monasteries; monk; monks; missionaries; pedestrian; pedestrians; bridges; ferry boats

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection

This is the old ferry pier at South Kessock with the ferry boat almost alongside. The village of North Kessock lies across the narrow stretch of water which marks the meeting of the Moray and Beauly Firths. The Kessock Ferry was an ancient water route between Inverness and the Black Isle. It was frequently used by local farmers and others wishing to avoid the long journey round the head of the Beauly Firth.<br /> <br /> The village of North Kessock is thought to have existed at least since the 1430s, when the Dominican monastery at Inverness was given permission to operate a ferry to the Black Isle. The name 'Kessock' derives from St Kessog, an Irish missionary. The village was developed during the early part of the nineteenth century on land owned by Sir William Fettes.<br /> <br /> Fettes bought the estate of Redcastle for £135,000 in 1825. This purchase included the rights to operate the ferry at Kessock. Within three years he had introduced steam-powered boats on the route and built new piers at both North Kessock and South Kessock. The Ferry was privately run until 1939, when Inverness Town Council and Ross and Cromarty County Council took control of the service. Only foot passengers could be carried until the late 1940s, when a vehicle ferry was introduced. The ferry service ended in 1982 with the opening of the Kessock Bridge. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.<br />