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TITLE
Friars Street, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_1999_116_X_7
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
11509
KEYWORDS
Friars Street
Dominican Friary
King Alexander II
Maggot
Friars Shott
Shiplands
Abbott of Arbroath
Old High Church
belltowers
Friars Street, Inverness

Friars Street in Inverness, with the tower of the Old High Church in the background. Friars Street is in the Maggot area of Inverness. The Maggot, which was originally an island, took its name from a chapel of St. Margaret and was situated between Waterloo Place, Glebe Street and the River Ness.

Friars Street still contains a burial ground belonging to the Black Friars of Inverness. The Dominican Friary was founded around 1233, by King Alexander II. The friars owned much of the property within the burgh, including the Maggot, the fishings at Friars Shott and the Shiplands. In 1372, the Friary was attacked by the Abbott of Arbroath's men and by 1436, the buildings were almost ruinous. By 1550, there were only five friars left in the Friary, and in 1554 the Prior, Robert Niche, was ordered to hand over all the Friary's properties, rents and tenements to Provost George Cuthbert and the Burgh Council.Thirteen years later, the Friary was no longer in use. In 1653, the materials used to build the Friary were sold to Colonel Lilburn, the Cromwellian Army Commander, to build the Citadel.

The Old High Church has stood on St. Michael's Mount since before 1171. Of the medieval church, the West Bell Tower is believed to be the oldest part, dating from the 15th or 16th century. The top of the tower dates from the 17th century and replaces the medieval spire and roof. It has a corbelled parapet and a copper-covered spire. The stone corbel-stones for the original timbers are still in existence inside the belfry. The tower has a clock with four faces, and the bell has been rung at 8pm almost every evening, since 1720. The only time when this was not the case was during World War II


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Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

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Friars Street, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

Friars Street; Dominican Friary; King Alexander II; Maggot; Friars Shott; Shiplands; Abbott of Arbroath; Old High Church; belltowers

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Joseph Cook Collection

Friars Street in Inverness, with the tower of the Old High Church in the background. Friars Street is in the Maggot area of Inverness. The Maggot, which was originally an island, took its name from a chapel of St. Margaret and was situated between Waterloo Place, Glebe Street and the River Ness.<br /> <br /> Friars Street still contains a burial ground belonging to the Black Friars of Inverness. The Dominican Friary was founded around 1233, by King Alexander II. The friars owned much of the property within the burgh, including the Maggot, the fishings at Friars Shott and the Shiplands. In 1372, the Friary was attacked by the Abbott of Arbroath's men and by 1436, the buildings were almost ruinous. By 1550, there were only five friars left in the Friary, and in 1554 the Prior, Robert Niche, was ordered to hand over all the Friary's properties, rents and tenements to Provost George Cuthbert and the Burgh Council.Thirteen years later, the Friary was no longer in use. In 1653, the materials used to build the Friary were sold to Colonel Lilburn, the Cromwellian Army Commander, to build the Citadel.<br /> <br /> The Old High Church has stood on St. Michael's Mount since before 1171. Of the medieval church, the West Bell Tower is believed to be the oldest part, dating from the 15th or 16th century. The top of the tower dates from the 17th century and replaces the medieval spire and roof. It has a corbelled parapet and a copper-covered spire. The stone corbel-stones for the original timbers are still in existence inside the belfry. The tower has a clock with four faces, and the bell has been rung at 8pm almost every evening, since 1720. The only time when this was not the case was during World War II <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.