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TITLE
Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (2 of 12)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CROMARTY_FISHERS_JAMES_HOGG_02
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
James Hogg
SOURCE
James Hogg
ASSET ID
1152
KEYWORDS
herring fishing
villages
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he talks about haddock fishing.

An Ah remember about thirty boats going to the west coast fishing from here. An there wis six men an a boy in each boat. That was apart from the men that went down the east coast, hired servants, an the men that was left at home to do the haddock fishing. Well Ah would say maself at that time there were about three hundred men in Cromarty when I wis a boy, three hundred fishermen when Ah wis a boy. An most of the fish that wis caught here an haddock, the haddock fish was transported to Dingwall an Inverness, an Ah remember as high as a hundred an eighty baskets o fish going on the boat from here to Invergordon, all bound for Inverness - haddocks.

There wis jist - there wis generally about three men, an the compliment wis four, out in a haddock boat. An they used about three lines a man, the haddocks, eight - eh, six hundred hooks in each line an three lines per man at that. That wis eighteen hundred hooks each man. Well, the worst of the work at that time wis the shelling of muscles an baiting the lines, at that time. It wis a hard job. The weemen had the worst o the job. Well, we used tae - Ah've seen as high as a ton o haddock on the boat coming in. In fact Ah sold a ton of haddocks, myself, in one catch to a curer here. Haddocks - and they were weighed some of them that day - seventeen haddocks to the hundredweight, to the hundredweight. There wis about eight or nine pound in every haddock - yes. An Ah sold them that day for five shillings per hundredweight.

And the herring fishing there was - practically all the herring fishing ports round the coast from Ireland to Yarmouth. Ah was in Donansbay [?] and in Lough Swilly, Buncrana. An I wis in Yarmouth an Lybster. An round the west coast, Stornoway, Castlebay, Stromness, Thurso, round the east coast, right doon. I've discharged two hundred and thirty cran o herring, in one shot, in Yarmouth for two an six a cran. Now that shot o herring in the present time, would be ye might say [?] fishing; it'd be two or three thousand pound the day.

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Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (2 of 12)

ROSS: Cromarty

1960s

herring fishing; villages; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

James Hogg

Am Baile: Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats

In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he talks about haddock fishing.<br /> <br /> An Ah remember about thirty boats going to the west coast fishing from here. An there wis six men an a boy in each boat. That was apart from the men that went down the east coast, hired servants, an the men that was left at home to do the haddock fishing. Well Ah would say maself at that time there were about three hundred men in Cromarty when I wis a boy, three hundred fishermen when Ah wis a boy. An most of the fish that wis caught here an haddock, the haddock fish was transported to Dingwall an Inverness, an Ah remember as high as a hundred an eighty baskets o fish going on the boat from here to Invergordon, all bound for Inverness - haddocks. <br /> <br /> There wis jist - there wis generally about three men, an the compliment wis four, out in a haddock boat. An they used about three lines a man, the haddocks, eight - eh, six hundred hooks in each line an three lines per man at that. That wis eighteen hundred hooks each man. Well, the worst of the work at that time wis the shelling of muscles an baiting the lines, at that time. It wis a hard job. The weemen had the worst o the job. Well, we used tae - Ah've seen as high as a ton o haddock on the boat coming in. In fact Ah sold a ton of haddocks, myself, in one catch to a curer here. Haddocks - and they were weighed some of them that day - seventeen haddocks to the hundredweight, to the hundredweight. There wis about eight or nine pound in every haddock - yes. An Ah sold them that day for five shillings per hundredweight. <br /> <br /> And the herring fishing there was - practically all the herring fishing ports round the coast from Ireland to Yarmouth. Ah was in Donansbay [?] and in Lough Swilly, Buncrana. An I wis in Yarmouth an Lybster. An round the west coast, Stornoway, Castlebay, Stromness, Thurso, round the east coast, right doon. I've discharged two hundred and thirty cran o herring, in one shot, in Yarmouth for two an six a cran. Now that shot o herring in the present time, would be ye might say [?] fishing; it'd be two or three thousand pound the day.