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TITLE
Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (3 of 12)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CROMARTY_FISHERS_JAMES_HOGG_03
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
James Hogg
SOURCE
James Hogg
ASSET ID
1153
KEYWORDS
herring fishing
villages
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he talks about herring fishing.

We used to start the herring fishing in May, first of May, generally through the Caledonian Canal. Some o the boats went through the Caledonian Canal, others went through the Pentland Firth. If they were bound for Stroma [?] they went the Pentland Firth, if they were going to Castlebay they went through the canal. Well, or to Ireland. Well through the canal we went to Ireland. There.

Now, they fished there till the middle of June an then came home and started the east coast fishing in Fraserburgh or Shetland. Well, I've a come home from Ireland in the middle of June an went to Baltasound in the north of Shetland, there, fished in Baltasound in the north of Shetland, an from there to Lerwick, an from Lerwick to Stronsay, an from Stronsay back to Fraserburgh, at the end of August. That would be the summer fishing.

Then we went from that to Yarmouth. Well, we started off, first, making a passage, Aberdeen. Shot the nets at [?] we called at Whitby, fished from Whitby, an from the Humber, from Grimsby, an then from Grimsby to Yarmouth. An we feenished off in Yarmouth about the first o December - the sail boat time, you know - an it took us some time comin an goin, ye know? But you could make quick passage sometimes. I've known it been done from Yarmouth, in a sail boat, to Portknockie, where I wis fishing from, in forty four hours, in a sail boat. I've known it been done that easy.

Well, after that [?] the east coast boats, ye know, [?] the Buckie boats an Peterhead boats an them, they fished in the winter fishing, but the Cromarty men never fished in the winter fishing except they went to the lochs with what they call the Baldie boats. My uncles used to go to the Loch Broom an Loch [?], fish there in the winter time, an they always carried what they call a, a dingy, a smaller boat. An they used to work that smaller boats, ye see, with nets close to the rocks, ye see, close to the rocks, an they used to do alright there. Well, there were one or two fishermen here, there was one man, Alexander Reid an his son-in-law, they went to Ireland to educate the Irish men on the fishing. They did for years, educating the Irish men.

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Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (3 of 12)

ROSS: Cromarty

1960s

herring fishing; villages; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

James Hogg

Am Baile: Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats

In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he talks about herring fishing.<br /> <br /> We used to start the herring fishing in May, first of May, generally through the Caledonian Canal. Some o the boats went through the Caledonian Canal, others went through the Pentland Firth. If they were bound for Stroma [?] they went the Pentland Firth, if they were going to Castlebay they went through the canal. Well, or to Ireland. Well through the canal we went to Ireland. There.<br /> <br /> Now, they fished there till the middle of June an then came home and started the east coast fishing in Fraserburgh or Shetland. Well, I've a come home from Ireland in the middle of June an went to Baltasound in the north of Shetland, there, fished in Baltasound in the north of Shetland, an from there to Lerwick, an from Lerwick to Stronsay, an from Stronsay back to Fraserburgh, at the end of August. That would be the summer fishing. <br /> <br /> Then we went from that to Yarmouth. Well, we started off, first, making a passage, Aberdeen. Shot the nets at [?] we called at Whitby, fished from Whitby, an from the Humber, from Grimsby, an then from Grimsby to Yarmouth. An we feenished off in Yarmouth about the first o December - the sail boat time, you know - an it took us some time comin an goin, ye know? But you could make quick passage sometimes. I've known it been done from Yarmouth, in a sail boat, to Portknockie, where I wis fishing from, in forty four hours, in a sail boat. I've known it been done that easy. <br /> <br /> Well, after that [?] the east coast boats, ye know, [?] the Buckie boats an Peterhead boats an them, they fished in the winter fishing, but the Cromarty men never fished in the winter fishing except they went to the lochs with what they call the Baldie boats. My uncles used to go to the Loch Broom an Loch [?], fish there in the winter time, an they always carried what they call a, a dingy, a smaller boat. An they used to work that smaller boats, ye see, with nets close to the rocks, ye see, close to the rocks, an they used to do alright there. Well, there were one or two fishermen here, there was one man, Alexander Reid an his son-in-law, they went to Ireland to educate the Irish men on the fishing. They did for years, educating the Irish men.