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TITLE
Map of the Moray Firth, 1730
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_AVERYMAP
PLACENAME
Moray Firth
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1730
PERIOD
1700s
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
11542
KEYWORDS
maps
plans
estates

This map of the Moray Firth was compiled by Joseph Avery between 1725 and 1730. It was produced for the York Buildings Company, London. The map was intended to record all relevant information associated with the company's iron-working undertakings in the Highlands which involved moving a lot of timber by sea.

It shows the "bounds of the woods already purchased by the Company for carrying on the Iron Manufactory", as well as the depths of water in the Moray Firth and Loch Ness and access for sailing ships to harbours. It also records many of the larger estates.

Water supply to parts of London was the sole business of the York Buildings Company until 1719 when it started purchasing forfeited estates, many in the Highlands. Attempts were made to establish new industries, such as copper and lead ore mining, in many of these places but these rarely proved profitable.

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Map of the Moray Firth, 1730

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1700s

maps; plans; estates

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

This map of the Moray Firth was compiled by Joseph Avery between 1725 and 1730. It was produced for the York Buildings Company, London. The map was intended to record all relevant information associated with the company's iron-working undertakings in the Highlands which involved moving a lot of timber by sea.<br /> <br /> It shows the "bounds of the woods already purchased by the Company for carrying on the Iron Manufactory", as well as the depths of water in the Moray Firth and Loch Ness and access for sailing ships to harbours. It also records many of the larger estates.<br /> <br /> Water supply to parts of London was the sole business of the York Buildings Company until 1719 when it started purchasing forfeited estates, many in the Highlands. Attempts were made to establish new industries, such as copper and lead ore mining, in many of these places but these rarely proved profitable.