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TITLE
Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (5 of 12)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CROMARTY_FISHERS_JAMES_HOGG_05
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
James Hogg
SOURCE
James Hogg
ASSET ID
1157
KEYWORDS
herring fishing
villages
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers the old trading schooners.

Interviewer: Can you tell us anything about the old trading schooners?

Yes, I remember the old trading schooners. The - there was an old - there was one schooner really belonged to Cromarty, what they called the 'Bonnie Lass o Wick', they called her. She was registered Wick, an Captain MacLean, Nelly MacLean's brother. An she was lost off of, eh, she was run down off Peterhead by a trawler called the 'Sunshine' of Aberdeen, an the very funny thing how that happened. There was a Cromarty man out on the boon, stowing the jib, what they call a flying jib, an the trawler came up underneath her bow at the dark, in the dark, an carried away the boon and the man. An the man wis, the trawler didn't know that he did it, he [?] it anyway. An when they found the man a couple o hours after that aboard the trawler, they wondered where he came from. An he told them that they ran a schooner down an that wis the first they wis supposed to have known about it. His name was William Locheran.

Well the ship herself, they cut the masts away from her an let her drift in the sea. An she was drifting north till they come to very near the Fair Isle, an there was a Grimsby trawler coming through the Pentland Firth an got her. Well, they had to destroy her, ye know, because she was a danger for shipping; that was the last o the 'Bonnie Lass'.

Well, then, the same man had a schooner called the Lily', that was after it, ye see. Well the 'Lily', I don't know really what, I think she was sold, [?]. But there was other schooners belonged to the Moray Firth that I knew [?]. There was the 'Surprise', she belonged to Invergordon, see, an there was the 'Hilda', belonged to Beauly, an there was the 'Maggie', belonged to Nairn, an the 'Narinshire' belonged to Nairn. An there was the 'Bunry' belonged to Inverness. An they, I've seen them often here an the last one was the 'Dispatch'. The 'Dispatch' wis the last schooner an the last ship at wis built on the Spey; the great building shipyard, ship building yard in Spey at that time where they built the fastest sailing ships at wis alfoat, in the Spey. Well the 'Dispatch' wis the last; belonged to McClymont o Avoch.

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Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (5 of 12)

ROSS: Cromarty

1960s

herring fishing; villages; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

James Hogg

Am Baile: Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats

In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers the old trading schooners.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Can you tell us anything about the old trading schooners? <br /> <br /> Yes, I remember the old trading schooners. The - there was an old - there was one schooner really belonged to Cromarty, what they called the 'Bonnie Lass o Wick', they called her. She was registered Wick, an Captain MacLean, Nelly MacLean's brother. An she was lost off of, eh, she was run down off Peterhead by a trawler called the 'Sunshine' of Aberdeen, an the very funny thing how that happened. There was a Cromarty man out on the boon, stowing the jib, what they call a flying jib, an the trawler came up underneath her bow at the dark, in the dark, an carried away the boon and the man. An the man wis, the trawler didn't know that he did it, he [?] it anyway. An when they found the man a couple o hours after that aboard the trawler, they wondered where he came from. An he told them that they ran a schooner down an that wis the first they wis supposed to have known about it. His name was William Locheran. <br /> <br /> Well the ship herself, they cut the masts away from her an let her drift in the sea. An she was drifting north till they come to very near the Fair Isle, an there was a Grimsby trawler coming through the Pentland Firth an got her. Well, they had to destroy her, ye know, because she was a danger for shipping; that was the last o the 'Bonnie Lass'. <br /> <br /> Well, then, the same man had a schooner called the Lily', that was after it, ye see. Well the 'Lily', I don't know really what, I think she was sold, [?]. But there was other schooners belonged to the Moray Firth that I knew [?]. There was the 'Surprise', she belonged to Invergordon, see, an there was the 'Hilda', belonged to Beauly, an there was the 'Maggie', belonged to Nairn, an the 'Narinshire' belonged to Nairn. An there was the 'Bunry' belonged to Inverness. An they, I've seen them often here an the last one was the 'Dispatch'. The 'Dispatch' wis the last schooner an the last ship at wis built on the Spey; the great building shipyard, ship building yard in Spey at that time where they built the fastest sailing ships at wis alfoat, in the Spey. Well the 'Dispatch' wis the last; belonged to McClymont o Avoch.