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TITLE
Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (7 of 12)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CROMARTY_FISHERS_JAMES_HOGG_07
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
James Hogg
SOURCE
James Hogg
ASSET ID
1160
KEYWORDS
herring fishing
villages
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers the local nail and spade factory.

Interviewer: There was also a nail and spade factory in Cromarty.

Eh?

Interviewer: Nail and spade factory.

Oh well, that was there, at the back of the property, belonged to a [?] an it was away up the back there. An in fact, you can see the remains of that, that factory where they'd put all the, when it was burnt, destroyed, where they put the rubbish of it, an you'll see it down on the beach there yet. Hiv ye not seen it?

Interviewer: No.

Oh well, I'll let you see it. You go down right below the Salmons' Bothy there, an ye'll see great big black bolts. You can't break it; solid iron an nails an everything that came oot there.

Interviewer: So it's actually burnt down?

Yes, burnt, it's burnt. There's carpet down there, you see? An it's formed now into a solid hard lump. Ye haven't seen the boys breaking it - trying there for money, have you? Yes, you'll see it, good lumps of it doon there.

Close to the nail factory, there was a man the name of John Mackay who was an exporter of whisky, an he used to mix his whisky, Ah've have good authority to know it, that he used to mix his whisky with water at came from the Stroopie Wellie. The Stroopie Wellie is a wellie jist up above Dan MacBean's [?] area. It's closed up but it's, the water's always there yet.

Interviewer: At the bottom of the Kirkie Brae?

Eh?

Interviewer: The well's at the bottom of the Kirkie Brae?

That's right. You'll see it aye [?] but it's closed up ye see, but I've, many a time, when Ah was a boy, went for a pitcher o water there, for drinking water. Many a. many a time.

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Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (7 of 12)

ROSS: Cromarty

1960s

herring fishing; villages; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

James Hogg

Am Baile: Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats

In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers the local nail and spade factory.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There was also a nail and spade factory in Cromarty.<br /> <br /> Eh?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Nail and spade factory. <br /> <br /> Oh well, that was there, at the back of the property, belonged to a [?] an it was away up the back there. An in fact, you can see the remains of that, that factory where they'd put all the, when it was burnt, destroyed, where they put the rubbish of it, an you'll see it down on the beach there yet. Hiv ye not seen it?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: No.<br /> <br /> Oh well, I'll let you see it. You go down right below the Salmons' Bothy there, an ye'll see great big black bolts. You can't break it; solid iron an nails an everything that came oot there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So it's actually burnt down?<br /> <br /> Yes, burnt, it's burnt. There's carpet down there, you see? An it's formed now into a solid hard lump. Ye haven't seen the boys breaking it - trying there for money, have you? Yes, you'll see it, good lumps of it doon there. <br /> <br /> Close to the nail factory, there was a man the name of John Mackay who was an exporter of whisky, an he used to mix his whisky, Ah've have good authority to know it, that he used to mix his whisky with water at came from the Stroopie Wellie. The Stroopie Wellie is a wellie jist up above Dan MacBean's [?] area. It's closed up but it's, the water's always there yet.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: At the bottom of the Kirkie Brae?<br /> <br /> Eh?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The well's at the bottom of the Kirkie Brae? <br /> <br /> That's right. You'll see it aye [?] but it's closed up ye see, but I've, many a time, when Ah was a boy, went for a pitcher o water there, for drinking water. Many a. many a time.