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TITLE
Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (11 of 12)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CROMARTY_FISHERS_JAMES_HOGG_11
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
James Hogg
SOURCE
James Hogg
ASSET ID
1166
KEYWORDS
herring fishing
villages
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers a dispute over the local mussel beds.

Interviewer: Was it flat fish that they caught principally?

Mmm?

Interviewer: Flat fish, principally was it?

Haddocks, haddocks. Oh haddocks, haddocks an cod. Haddocks an cod an flatfish. Oh ye used to get a fair price for flatfish, ye know. The curers used to send them to Manchester, an Billingsgate. But Manchester was particularly my favourite. I sold them to Manchester, I sent them to Manchester myself. I bought em an sent them to Manchester myself, yeah.

Interviewer: Where did you get the mussels?

Over here. Over the other side. To tell you the story about the mussels the - All the mussels inside Cromarty Firth belongs to the fishermen in Cromarty, right up to Dingwall. Yes. They belong to the fishermen in Cromarty. The title deeds [?] Where are the title deeds I don't know, but last that I know the man that had them went to Canada. They tried to stop them from getting the mussels - the Duke of Sutherland over here in Cadboll, he used to come down and chase them away, the horses once they got oot on the sand there. So, in my grandfather's time, they took it to the Court o Session. An Hugh Miller wis one o them that assisted them. An they won their case in the Court o Session. An other places was supposed to help them but they never got no help, but themselves. An they claimed the mussels - the mussels belonged to them. Well, before the First War, General Ross, the late General Ross, tried to sew mussels down on the west side o the pier there, so that he could get compensation for it if the dockyaird was coming to Cromarty see at that time, I suppose. They could come to Cromarty instead of Invergordon. An he'd thought he'd get compensation for it. But the fisherman went down an loosed the horses an left the cairts there. An Ah wis one o them!

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Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (11 of 12)

ROSS: Cromarty

1960s

herring fishing; villages; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

James Hogg

Am Baile: Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats

In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he remembers a dispute over the local mussel beds.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was it flat fish that they caught principally? <br /> <br /> Mmm?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Flat fish, principally was it? <br /> <br /> Haddocks, haddocks. Oh haddocks, haddocks an cod. Haddocks an cod an flatfish. Oh ye used to get a fair price for flatfish, ye know. The curers used to send them to Manchester, an Billingsgate. But Manchester was particularly my favourite. I sold them to Manchester, I sent them to Manchester myself. I bought em an sent them to Manchester myself, yeah.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Where did you get the mussels? <br /> <br /> Over here. Over the other side. To tell you the story about the mussels the - All the mussels inside Cromarty Firth belongs to the fishermen in Cromarty, right up to Dingwall. Yes. They belong to the fishermen in Cromarty. The title deeds [?] Where are the title deeds I don't know, but last that I know the man that had them went to Canada. They tried to stop them from getting the mussels - the Duke of Sutherland over here in Cadboll, he used to come down and chase them away, the horses once they got oot on the sand there. So, in my grandfather's time, they took it to the Court o Session. An Hugh Miller wis one o them that assisted them. An they won their case in the Court o Session. An other places was supposed to help them but they never got no help, but themselves. An they claimed the mussels - the mussels belonged to them. Well, before the First War, General Ross, the late General Ross, tried to sew mussels down on the west side o the pier there, so that he could get compensation for it if the dockyaird was coming to Cromarty see at that time, I suppose. They could come to Cromarty instead of Invergordon. An he'd thought he'd get compensation for it. But the fisherman went down an loosed the horses an left the cairts there. An Ah wis one o them!