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TITLE
Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (12 of 12)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_CROMARTY_FISHERS_JAMES_HOGG_12
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
James Hogg
SOURCE
James Hogg
ASSET ID
1167
KEYWORDS
herring fishing
villages
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he talks about mussel pearls.

Interviewer: Do they ever get pearls in the mussels?

Yes, I've see my late misses with a half a, half an eggcup full o them; pearls an mussels.

Interviewer: Were these down near Dingwall then, found down near Dingwall?

No, right - ye know, ye know that, that red buoy over there?

Interviewer: Yes.

Jist about two hundred yards wi shore that buoy, we went alongside a scap of mussels like that and, awh, everyone was about that length, big mussels.

Interviewer: Three inches long.

Yeah. About three or four year old. An my late Mrs, when she was baitin the line, she would, she would get the pearl feelin. An I gave them, I took them, an I gave them to Provost Frew - he's the jeweller in Dingwall - an I gave them to him. An he says, 'They're not great value Mr Hogg,' he says 'not great value', he said, but he said, (I don't mind - he gave me something for them like six or seven shillings), but they might be valuable now. But they're different from the oyster pearls you see, different.

Interviewer: Yes.

They're a little blue, blue pearl, the mussel pearl.

Interviewer: Are they smaller than the oyster pearl?

Yes, I'll tell ye what they're the size of. Ye've seen the, eh, 'Growmore' seed? Ye know. Have ye seen that? About this size? [?] No much bigger than the head o a pea.

Interviewer: I used to get them when I was in school in the west coast, in the mussels.

Yes, yes, yes. Oh yes. Oh ye get them in e old mussels, ye know.

Interviewer: Yes.

Old mussels. Ye'll not get them in young mussels but ye get them in the old ones. If ye get the mussels about that size ye're almost sure tae get them, but not mussels that were grown on the piles or anything like that, ye won't get them there, but mussels that were grown on the sand.

Interviewer: And especially near fresh water?

Yes, yes. Near fresh water you would say.

Interviewer: They used to get good ones at the mouth of the River Conon.

Yes, yes. Oh yes. Yes, yes. Aye, near the fresh water you get them.

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Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats (12 of 12)

ROSS: Cromarty

1960s

herring fishing; villages; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

James Hogg

Am Baile: Memories of Cromarty and its Fishing Boats

In the 1960s, James Hogg, a former Cromarty fisherman, was interviewed about the fishing industry in the town. When he was a boy, there were around three hundred fishermen in Cromarty. James was the father of Bobby and Gordon Hogg, currently the last two speakers of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect. In this audio extract he talks about mussel pearls.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do they ever get pearls in the mussels? <br /> <br /> Yes, I've see my late misses with a half a, half an eggcup full o them; pearls an mussels.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Were these down near Dingwall then, found down near Dingwall? <br /> <br /> No, right - ye know, ye know that, that red buoy over there?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Jist about two hundred yards wi shore that buoy, we went alongside a scap of mussels like that and, awh, everyone was about that length, big mussels. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Three inches long.<br /> <br /> Yeah. About three or four year old. An my late Mrs, when she was baitin the line, she would, she would get the pearl feelin. An I gave them, I took them, an I gave them to Provost Frew - he's the jeweller in Dingwall - an I gave them to him. An he says, 'They're not great value Mr Hogg,' he says 'not great value', he said, but he said, (I don't mind - he gave me something for them like six or seven shillings), but they might be valuable now. But they're different from the oyster pearls you see, different.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> They're a little blue, blue pearl, the mussel pearl. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Are they smaller than the oyster pearl?<br /> <br /> Yes, I'll tell ye what they're the size of. Ye've seen the, eh, 'Growmore' seed? Ye know. Have ye seen that? About this size? [?] No much bigger than the head o a pea. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: I used to get them when I was in school in the west coast, in the mussels. <br /> <br /> Yes, yes, yes. Oh yes. Oh ye get them in e old mussels, ye know. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Old mussels. Ye'll not get them in young mussels but ye get them in the old ones. If ye get the mussels about that size ye're almost sure tae get them, but not mussels that were grown on the piles or anything like that, ye won't get them there, but mussels that were grown on the sand.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And especially near fresh water?<br /> <br /> Yes, yes. Near fresh water you would say.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: They used to get good ones at the mouth of the River Conon.<br /> <br /> Yes, yes. Oh yes. Yes, yes. Aye, near the fresh water you get them.