Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
HR 53 on the Lybster branch line
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_RAILWAYSLIDES_987_168_27
PLACENAME
Lybster
DISTRICT
Caithness - Southern
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Latheron
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
11696
KEYWORDS
railways
trains
transport
disused stations
closed stations
closed railways
closed lines
disused railways
light railways
legislation
Far North Line
North Highland Line
HR 53 on the Lybster branch line

In this picture, HR 53 'Lybster' can be seen on the Lybster branch-line.

The Wick and Lybster Railway on the east coast of Caithness opened on 1 July 1903. There were stations in Thrumster, Ulbster, Mid Clyth, Occumster and Lybster in addition to halts at Welsh's Crossing, Roster Road and Parkside.

This rural railway was built under the Light Railways Act 1896, an act which aimed to expand the rail network in rural areas through making it easier and less expensive to build new railways. Lybster was once the third largest herring port in Scotland after Wick and Fraserburgh and the fishing industry was the main reason for the building of the line.

The line was independent but the trains were worked on behalf of the company by the Highland Railway. The railway was taken over by the LMS in 1923. The final trains on the line ran in 1944. Lybster station building is now used by the town's golf club.

In 1890, to replace the ageing Belladrum class 2-2-2 tank engine 'Strathpeffer' (HR 12), the Highland Railway built a new saddle tank engine at their Lochgorm works in Inverness. It also had a 2-2-2 wheel configuration and was also named 'Strathpeffer'. It was originally numbered 13 but was renumbered 53 in September 1899. It was rebuilt with a new boiler and side tanks in 1901 and renamed 'Lybster' in May 1903 when it was transferred to work on the newly completed Wick to Lybster Railway. It was renumbered again in 1919, this time to 53A, passed into LMS ownership as 15050. It was withdrawn from service in December 1929.


This image may be available to purchase.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Highland Photographic Archive

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

HR 53 on the Lybster branch line

CAITHNESS: Latheron

railways; trains; transport; disused stations; closed stations; closed railways; closed lines; disused railways; light railways; legislation; Far North Line; North Highland Line;

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Railway Lantern Slides

In this picture, HR 53 'Lybster' can be seen on the Lybster branch-line. <br /> <br /> The Wick and Lybster Railway on the east coast of Caithness opened on 1 July 1903. There were stations in Thrumster, Ulbster, Mid Clyth, Occumster and Lybster in addition to halts at Welsh's Crossing, Roster Road and Parkside. <br /> <br /> This rural railway was built under the Light Railways Act 1896, an act which aimed to expand the rail network in rural areas through making it easier and less expensive to build new railways. Lybster was once the third largest herring port in Scotland after Wick and Fraserburgh and the fishing industry was the main reason for the building of the line.<br /> <br /> The line was independent but the trains were worked on behalf of the company by the Highland Railway. The railway was taken over by the LMS in 1923. The final trains on the line ran in 1944. Lybster station building is now used by the town's golf club.<br /> <br /> In 1890, to replace the ageing Belladrum class 2-2-2 tank engine 'Strathpeffer' (HR 12), the Highland Railway built a new saddle tank engine at their Lochgorm works in Inverness. It also had a 2-2-2 wheel configuration and was also named 'Strathpeffer'. It was originally numbered 13 but was renumbered 53 in September 1899. It was rebuilt with a new boiler and side tanks in 1901 and renamed 'Lybster' in May 1903 when it was transferred to work on the newly completed Wick to Lybster Railway. It was renumbered again in 1919, this time to 53A, passed into LMS ownership as 15050. It was withdrawn from service in December 1929. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a><br />