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TITLE
Travelling People and their Horses
EXTERNAL ID
AB_ESSIE_STEWART_10
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Essie Stewart
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1186
KEYWORDS
travelling folk
travellers
lifestyles
gypsies
audios

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Essie Stewart is a traditional storyteller from Sutherland and one of the last people to have taken part in the traditional 'Summer Walking' of the travelling families. She is the grand-daughter of Ailidh Dall Stewart (1882-1968), one of the greatest Gaelic storytellers. Essie tells her stories in both English and Gaelic.

In this audio extract, recorded at the Ullapool Book Festival in 2008, Essie talks about the importance of travelling peoples' horses.

Audience member: In that economic, or cashless economy, your horse was an extremely important part - the one horse power part -

Oh yes.

'Audience member: What do you remember of your horses? Were they like a small Clydesdale or a big Garron?

Highland Garrons.

Audience member: Yes, and their names and their characters?

The, the two, the last two that we had - My grandfather bought me a white mare called Maggie, and the horse, the brown horse that we had was called Tom. And our dog - and I must mention this - we always had dogs. We had a, a cross, she was a cross lurcher, collie lurcher, and the last litter of pups that she had in 1951 was at Braetongue. And she had six black and white puppies, and one brown dog, and I kept that brown dog and I called him Loyal, for Ben Loyal, and that dog died at seventeen. In fact, I was away and married and that dog was still going. So, oh yes, the horses were very important.

And, you know, important to us but also important in - to the communities in which we travelled because if crofters didn't have horses, and some of them didn't, and, you know, it was before tractors, they would get a loan of our horses to do their spring work. And the same in the autumn, you know, for pulling the, you know, carting the hay in, and things like that. So, yes it was, you know, yeah, horses very important.'

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Travelling People and their Horses

2000s

travelling folk; travellers; lifestyles; gypsies; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Essie Stewart

Essie Stewart is a traditional storyteller from Sutherland and one of the last people to have taken part in the traditional 'Summer Walking' of the travelling families. She is the grand-daughter of Ailidh Dall Stewart (1882-1968), one of the greatest Gaelic storytellers. Essie tells her stories in both English and Gaelic.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract, recorded at the Ullapool Book Festival in 2008, Essie talks about the importance of travelling peoples' horses.<br /> <br /> Audience member: In that economic, or cashless economy, your horse was an extremely important part - the one horse power part - <br /> <br /> Oh yes. <br /> <br /> 'Audience member: What do you remember of your horses? Were they like a small Clydesdale or a big Garron? <br /> <br /> Highland Garrons.<br /> <br /> Audience member: Yes, and their names and their characters?<br /> <br /> The, the two, the last two that we had - My grandfather bought me a white mare called Maggie, and the horse, the brown horse that we had was called Tom. And our dog - and I must mention this - we always had dogs. We had a, a cross, she was a cross lurcher, collie lurcher, and the last litter of pups that she had in 1951 was at Braetongue. And she had six black and white puppies, and one brown dog, and I kept that brown dog and I called him Loyal, for Ben Loyal, and that dog died at seventeen. In fact, I was away and married and that dog was still going. So, oh yes, the horses were very important. <br /> <br /> And, you know, important to us but also important in - to the communities in which we travelled because if crofters didn't have horses, and some of them didn't, and, you know, it was before tractors, they would get a loan of our horses to do their spring work. And the same in the autumn, you know, for pulling the, you know, carting the hay in, and things like that. So, yes it was, you know, yeah, horses very important.'