Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
The Stewart family home at Lairg
EXTERNAL ID
AB_ESSIE_STEWART_12
PLACENAME
Lairg
DISTRICT
Golspie, Rogart and Lairg
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Lairg
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Essie Stewart
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1189
KEYWORDS
travelling folk
travellers
lifestyles
gypsies
audios

Get Adobe Flash player

Essie Stewart is a traditional storyteller from Sutherland and one of the last people to have taken part in the traditional 'Summer Walking' of the travelling families. She is the grand-daughter of Ailidh Dall Stewart (1882-1968), one of the greatest Gaelic storytellers. Essie tells her stories in both English and Gaelic.

In this audio extract, recorded at the Ullapool Book Festival in 2008, Essie talks about the family home in Lairg.

Audience member: Where did you go to school?

Lairg.

Audience member: In Lairg?

Yes, yes, the - Our home was, our home was at Lairg, and that's another, that's another wee story maybe that's worth telling. My granny and grandfather in 19-, wait a minute now. My mother was born in 1909, so in 1911 they had a house and they were living in Thurso. And, you know, 19-, sort of 1912, 1913 there was talk, well, you know, talk of war, and my grandfather decided to come back to Sutherland to where his people were and you know, that his wife and child would be with their own folk.

And he came back to Lairg and got the piece of land where our home was. And at that time there was a brickworks at Lairg, just at the railway station; the remnants are still there. And he carted every brick with the horse and cart, and he built the home that I was brought up in. And, of course, 1914, he was, he was called up and he was in France for the four years of the war, and he was in a regiment that no longer exists either, the Scottish Horse. And, his wife, my granny, she took ill - she was living with her own mum and dad at Edderton - and she took ill and he got compassionate leave to come home and see her. And when he got back to his unit in France there was a telegram waiting for him to say that his wife had died, at 26. So, he didn't get home for the funeral; she was dead and buried for ten days before he got home. And eventually, he - you know, when he was demobbed - he came back and got his little daughter and went back to the home that he had built, and he never remarried. And the only time that I ever heard my grandfather speak about his wife would be at New Year time if he had a dram and he would always say, ' My Annie,' you know, and that was the only time that I - he never spoke about it and probably it was just, it was too painful.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

The Stewart family home at Lairg

SUTHERLAND: Lairg

2000s

travelling folk; travellers; lifestyles; gypsies; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Essie Stewart

Essie Stewart is a traditional storyteller from Sutherland and one of the last people to have taken part in the traditional 'Summer Walking' of the travelling families. She is the grand-daughter of Ailidh Dall Stewart (1882-1968), one of the greatest Gaelic storytellers. Essie tells her stories in both English and Gaelic.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract, recorded at the Ullapool Book Festival in 2008, Essie talks about the family home in Lairg.<br /> <br /> Audience member: Where did you go to school?<br /> <br /> Lairg. <br /> <br /> Audience member: In Lairg?<br /> <br /> Yes, yes, the - Our home was, our home was at Lairg, and that's another, that's another wee story maybe that's worth telling. My granny and grandfather in 19-, wait a minute now. My mother was born in 1909, so in 1911 they had a house and they were living in Thurso. And, you know, 19-, sort of 1912, 1913 there was talk, well, you know, talk of war, and my grandfather decided to come back to Sutherland to where his people were and you know, that his wife and child would be with their own folk. <br /> <br /> And he came back to Lairg and got the piece of land where our home was. And at that time there was a brickworks at Lairg, just at the railway station; the remnants are still there. And he carted every brick with the horse and cart, and he built the home that I was brought up in. And, of course, 1914, he was, he was called up and he was in France for the four years of the war, and he was in a regiment that no longer exists either, the Scottish Horse. And, his wife, my granny, she took ill - she was living with her own mum and dad at Edderton - and she took ill and he got compassionate leave to come home and see her. And when he got back to his unit in France there was a telegram waiting for him to say that his wife had died, at 26. So, he didn't get home for the funeral; she was dead and buried for ten days before he got home. And eventually, he - you know, when he was demobbed - he came back and got his little daughter and went back to the home that he had built, and he never remarried. And the only time that I ever heard my grandfather speak about his wife would be at New Year time if he had a dram and he would always say, ' My Annie,' you know, and that was the only time that I - he never spoke about it and probably it was just, it was too painful.