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TITLE
Essie Stewart remembers Hamish Henderson
EXTERNAL ID
AB_ESSIE_STEWART_14
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Essie Stewart
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1192
KEYWORDS
travelling folk
travellers
lifestyles
gypsies
audios

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Essie Stewart is a traditional storyteller from Sutherland and one of the last people to have taken part in the traditional 'Summer Walking' of the travelling families. She is the grand-daughter of Ailidh Dall Stewart (1882-1968), one of the greatest Gaelic storytellers. Essie tells her stories in both English and Gaelic.

In this audio extract, recorded at the Ullapool Book Festival in 2008, Essie remembers Hamish Henderson.

Audience member: I know that Hamish Henderson had a lot of very amusing stories about his days travelling with your family, and having known him in his Edinburgh prime, in Sandy Bell's pub, and then you mentioned your family only had drink at New Year; it must have been hard for a man like Hamish going on the road? [Laughter] Have you got any amusing stories about the time Hamish Henderson was on the road with your family?

Do you know, he was very well behaved.

[Laughter]

Hamish, Hamish Henderson - and he had an American with him that year, Bobby, Dr Bobby Botsford and Norman Maclean, you know, our own dear Norman - he was, he was there as well. And you know, they were with us for most of that summer. And I can honest - I can say in all honesty - Hamish used to have, he liked his cans of Guinness. But the odd half bottle, you know, and he would give my grandfather a dram and you know, if there was men there. But no, he was, he was actually very well behaved. But you know, in 19-, the last year that we were on the road, 1957, that was the last year that Hamish came up and, or was it '55? Och gosh, I can't remember, it's so long. But it was, we had, it was the time of the Suez crisis, and you know, petrol, you know, they had no, they had no - and they left him with a car. And he, he maintained it was a landrover, but it wasn't a landrover, it was an old Austin A40 that he had, driving about. And Hamish had no licence to drive! [Laughter] But we were delighted, you know, my cousin Gordon and I. Och, we thought we were the bees knees going trundling about the countryside in this old Austin A40.

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Essie Stewart remembers Hamish Henderson

2000s

travelling folk; travellers; lifestyles; gypsies; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Essie Stewart

Essie Stewart is a traditional storyteller from Sutherland and one of the last people to have taken part in the traditional 'Summer Walking' of the travelling families. She is the grand-daughter of Ailidh Dall Stewart (1882-1968), one of the greatest Gaelic storytellers. Essie tells her stories in both English and Gaelic.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract, recorded at the Ullapool Book Festival in 2008, Essie remembers Hamish Henderson.<br /> <br /> Audience member: I know that Hamish Henderson had a lot of very amusing stories about his days travelling with your family, and having known him in his Edinburgh prime, in Sandy Bell's pub, and then you mentioned your family only had drink at New Year; it must have been hard for a man like Hamish going on the road? [Laughter] Have you got any amusing stories about the time Hamish Henderson was on the road with your family?<br /> <br /> Do you know, he was very well behaved. <br /> <br /> [Laughter]<br /> <br /> Hamish, Hamish Henderson - and he had an American with him that year, Bobby, Dr Bobby Botsford and Norman Maclean, you know, our own dear Norman - he was, he was there as well. And you know, they were with us for most of that summer. And I can honest - I can say in all honesty - Hamish used to have, he liked his cans of Guinness. But the odd half bottle, you know, and he would give my grandfather a dram and you know, if there was men there. But no, he was, he was actually very well behaved. But you know, in 19-, the last year that we were on the road, 1957, that was the last year that Hamish came up and, or was it '55? Och gosh, I can't remember, it's so long. But it was, we had, it was the time of the Suez crisis, and you know, petrol, you know, they had no, they had no - and they left him with a car. And he, he maintained it was a landrover, but it wasn't a landrover, it was an old Austin A40 that he had, driving about. And Hamish had no licence to drive! [Laughter] But we were delighted, you know, my cousin Gordon and I. Och, we thought we were the bees knees going trundling about the countryside in this old Austin A40.