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TITLE
Entrance to Spar Cave
EXTERNAL ID
HCD00666
PLACENAME
Elgol
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1920s; 1930s
CREATOR
Duncan Macpherson
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
12378
KEYWORDS
cave
Spar Cave
Sir Walter Scott
spar
Entrance to Spar Cave

Situated at Drinan, near Elgol on the Isle of Skye, the Spar Cave, (Slochd Altrimen - the Cave of the Nursling), gets its name from the lustrous crystalline mineral which has formed on the walls of the cave, creating an impressive effect when illuminated by torchlight. The cave, about 80 metres deep, is accessible only on foot at very low tide and after a scramble over rocks. There is a 'fossilized' waterfall in the interior which leads from a small lake, and the cave was once heavily encrusted with spar formations, however much of this was removed by visitors in the 19th century, after the cave became a popular tourist attraction when it featured in Sir Walter Scott's work "The Lord of the Isles". This photograph may have been taken when Duncan Macpherson first visited the cave in 1921, and he describes this boat trip from Elgol in his book 'Gateway to Skye'


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Entrance to Spar Cave

INVERNESS: Strath

1920s; 1930s

cave; Spar Cave; Sir Walter Scott; spar

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Duncan Macpherson (photographs)

Situated at Drinan, near Elgol on the Isle of Skye, the Spar Cave, (Slochd Altrimen - the Cave of the Nursling), gets its name from the lustrous crystalline mineral which has formed on the walls of the cave, creating an impressive effect when illuminated by torchlight. The cave, about 80 metres deep, is accessible only on foot at very low tide and after a scramble over rocks. There is a 'fossilized' waterfall in the interior which leads from a small lake, and the cave was once heavily encrusted with spar formations, however much of this was removed by visitors in the 19th century, after the cave became a popular tourist attraction when it featured in Sir Walter Scott's work "The Lord of the Isles". This photograph may have been taken when Duncan Macpherson first visited the cave in 1921, and he describes this boat trip from Elgol in his book 'Gateway to Skye' <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a><br />