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TITLE
'Writing in the Sand'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ANGUS_DUNN_01
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Angus Dunn
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1241
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is a brief introduction to 'Writing in the Sand' by Angus Dunn, published in 2006. It is read here by the author.

'On the very tip of the Dark Island lies the tiny, tranquil fishing village of Cromness. But all is not well in Cromness. Jimmy Bervie is a local eccentric, some might call him the village idiot, but he knows more about sub-atomic physics than you would imagine. He knows something's wrong, but he doesn't know what it is. Twice a day he goes down on the beach and rakes the sand, trying to read the future from the falls of sand grains.

Alice weighs twenty-six stones and she's a powerful woman. She and others in Cromness believe that she's a priestess of the ancient Celtic gods. She knows there's something wrong but she doesn't know what it is. So she's sending her niece, Doreen, into the Drooping Cave to seek visions from the goddess.

The Reverend John Dumfry is minister of the first ancient and reformed Presbyterian Church of Cromness. He is horrified one day to go into the church and discover that it is completely empty - God has left the church. So he knows something's wrong, but he doesn't know what it is. So he's out searching the highways and the byways and even among the bushes of the hillside, looking for the hand of God.

And then there's George. George has just come back from university and he wants to know who his father is. His mother knows, but she's in the mental hospital up in Craig Dunain and she's not telling. George doesn't know there's a problem and that's because he's part of the problem. And by the time he finds out who his family really are and what the problem is, it is almost too late. And it's not a trivial matter, the very earth will shake.'

Angus Dunn was brought up in Aultbea and Cromarty and now lives near Strathpeffer in Ross-shire. He is the author of 'The Perfect Loaf', (2008) a collection of short stories. His novel, 'Writing in the Sand' (2006) was short-listed for the Saltire Society's Scottish Literary Award. Angus's work has been published in many literary magazines including 'New Writing Scotland' and 'Shorts: the Macallan/Scotland on Sunday Short Story Collection'. His stories have also been broadcast on Radio 4, Radio Scotland and Loch Broom FM.

Angus was awarded the 1995 Robert Louis Stevenson Prize and the 2002 Neil Gunn Short Story Prize. His poetry has been published in many Scottish magazines and anthologies.

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'Writing in the Sand'

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Angus Dunn

This audio extract is a brief introduction to 'Writing in the Sand' by Angus Dunn, published in 2006. It is read here by the author.<br /> <br /> 'On the very tip of the Dark Island lies the tiny, tranquil fishing village of Cromness. But all is not well in Cromness. Jimmy Bervie is a local eccentric, some might call him the village idiot, but he knows more about sub-atomic physics than you would imagine. He knows something's wrong, but he doesn't know what it is. Twice a day he goes down on the beach and rakes the sand, trying to read the future from the falls of sand grains. <br /> <br /> Alice weighs twenty-six stones and she's a powerful woman. She and others in Cromness believe that she's a priestess of the ancient Celtic gods. She knows there's something wrong but she doesn't know what it is. So she's sending her niece, Doreen, into the Drooping Cave to seek visions from the goddess. <br /> <br /> The Reverend John Dumfry is minister of the first ancient and reformed Presbyterian Church of Cromness. He is horrified one day to go into the church and discover that it is completely empty - God has left the church. So he knows something's wrong, but he doesn't know what it is. So he's out searching the highways and the byways and even among the bushes of the hillside, looking for the hand of God. <br /> <br /> And then there's George. George has just come back from university and he wants to know who his father is. His mother knows, but she's in the mental hospital up in Craig Dunain and she's not telling. George doesn't know there's a problem and that's because he's part of the problem. And by the time he finds out who his family really are and what the problem is, it is almost too late. And it's not a trivial matter, the very earth will shake.'<br /> <br /> Angus Dunn was brought up in Aultbea and Cromarty and now lives near Strathpeffer in Ross-shire. He is the author of 'The Perfect Loaf', (2008) a collection of short stories. His novel, 'Writing in the Sand' (2006) was short-listed for the Saltire Society's Scottish Literary Award. Angus's work has been published in many literary magazines including 'New Writing Scotland' and 'Shorts: the Macallan/Scotland on Sunday Short Story Collection'. His stories have also been broadcast on Radio 4, Radio Scotland and Loch Broom FM. <br /> <br /> Angus was awarded the 1995 Robert Louis Stevenson Prize and the 2002 Neil Gunn Short Story Prize. His poetry has been published in many Scottish magazines and anthologies.