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TITLE
'Crossing a Field'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ANGUS_MARTIN_03
PLACENAME
Ben Gullion
DISTRICT
Kintyre
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Campbeltown
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Angus Martin
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1252
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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The poem 'Crossing a Field' was written by Angus Martin in 2007. It is read here by the author. (Image by kind permission of George McSporran.)

'Crossing a Field', was written on my way to Bengullion. As I passed a ruined house in a field behind Limecraigs, I saw, for the first time, that it and the tree beside it had reached practically the same state of decay. Then a little metaphysical trickery invaded the space between the images, and by the time I had reached the foot of Ben Gullion, the completed poem had been scribbled into my notebook. My wife, Judy, finds more in it to admire than I do, and I include it for her.

Crossing a Field

Dead tree and ruined house together
leafless roofless in a world
from which a shining feather
to an outer abyss hurled

would merely falter to the ground
the fillet of some gentle dream
a crown of buds worn all around
children splashing in the avid stream

but light there's more of light
bare branches hold no shade
rooms darken only in the night
where even time has languished and decayed.

Angus Martin was born in Campbeltown in 1952 and comes from a long line of local Dalintober fishermen. He grew up with an intimate knowledge of local fishermen and their stories, and followed them to sea with the local fishing fleet, but as a young man experienced something of an epiphany and abandoned his traditional career to follow the writing muse. 'The Ring-net Fishermen' (1981) brought him immediate recognition as a meticulous and original researcher. Much of his material was based on personal interviews.

Angus was introduced to the Kintyre farming communities whilst working formerly as a refuse collector and latterly as a rural postman. His social history, 'Kintyre Country Life', was first published in 1987. Angus also edits 'The Magazine of the Kintyre Antiquarian and Natural History Society'.

'The Larch Plantation' (1990) established Angus as a thoughtful poet, inspired by the landscapes of Kintyre and the people who have lived there. Married with two daughters, he rarely ventures forth of Kintyre but is widely recognised throughout the Scottish literary world as a repository of local history and folk memories, and as a connoisseur of Campbeltown malt whiskies.

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'Crossing a Field'

ARGYLL: Campbeltown

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Angus Martin

The poem 'Crossing a Field' was written by Angus Martin in 2007. It is read here by the author. (Image by kind permission of George McSporran.)<br /> <br /> 'Crossing a Field', was written on my way to Bengullion. As I passed a ruined house in a field behind Limecraigs, I saw, for the first time, that it and the tree beside it had reached practically the same state of decay. Then a little metaphysical trickery invaded the space between the images, and by the time I had reached the foot of Ben Gullion, the completed poem had been scribbled into my notebook. My wife, Judy, finds more in it to admire than I do, and I include it for her. <br /> <br /> Crossing a Field<br /> <br /> Dead tree and ruined house together<br /> leafless roofless in a world<br /> from which a shining feather<br /> to an outer abyss hurled<br /> <br /> would merely falter to the ground<br /> the fillet of some gentle dream<br /> a crown of buds worn all around<br /> children splashing in the avid stream<br /> <br /> but light there's more of light<br /> bare branches hold no shade<br /> rooms darken only in the night<br /> where even time has languished and decayed.<br /> <br /> Angus Martin was born in Campbeltown in 1952 and comes from a long line of local Dalintober fishermen. He grew up with an intimate knowledge of local fishermen and their stories, and followed them to sea with the local fishing fleet, but as a young man experienced something of an epiphany and abandoned his traditional career to follow the writing muse. 'The Ring-net Fishermen' (1981) brought him immediate recognition as a meticulous and original researcher. Much of his material was based on personal interviews. <br /> <br /> Angus was introduced to the Kintyre farming communities whilst working formerly as a refuse collector and latterly as a rural postman. His social history, 'Kintyre Country Life', was first published in 1987. Angus also edits 'The Magazine of the Kintyre Antiquarian and Natural History Society'. <br /> <br /> 'The Larch Plantation' (1990) established Angus as a thoughtful poet, inspired by the landscapes of Kintyre and the people who have lived there. Married with two daughters, he rarely ventures forth of Kintyre but is widely recognised throughout the Scottish literary world as a repository of local history and folk memories, and as a connoisseur of Campbeltown malt whiskies.