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TITLE
'The Highlanders'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ANNE_GRANT_01
PLACENAME
Laggan
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Anne Grant
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1258
KEYWORDS
literature
poetry
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from part one of Anne Grant of Laggan's poem, 'The Highlanders'. The poem is contained within the volume, 'Poems on Various Subjects', published by Mrs. Grant in 1803. It is read here by Sue Skelton.

'Come, then, explore with me each winding glen,
Far from the noisy haunts of busy men;
Let us with stedfast eye attentive trace
The local habits of the Celtic race;
Renown'd even in those old heroic times,
That live in Ossian's songs, and Runic rhymes;
When ardent Valour call'd his children forth,
And Glory lighten'd through the beaming North:
Whose hardy sons that twilight age adorn,
Like the quick splendours of the Boreal morn,
Fill'd with amaze and awe the world's dread kings,
And bade their eagles stoop with flagging wings.
Come, trace with curious search what secret cause
Each native's heart with strong attraction draws,
Though wealth in happier lands her stores unlock,
To cling with fervour to his native rock:
Why lonely mountains, dark with russet heath,
And rushing streams, and narrow vales beneath;
With more delight his wand'ring eye detain,
Than Forth's rich banks, or Lothian's fertile plain:
The many-colour'd herd, his wealth and pride,
Like deer, through wastes extended, wand'ring wide:
And sportive goats, a bold aspiring flock,
High on the ridge of yon aerial rock,
More self-importance to his mind impart,
And fill with warmer joys his simple heart,
Than all the flocks the southern shepherd pens,
Or the fat herds that graze the Lincoln fens.'

Mrs. Anne Grant of Laggan was born Anne MacVicar in Glasgow in 1755. She was the daughter of Duncan MacVicar, an army officer. The family spent some time in North America before returning to Scotland to Fort Augustus in 1773. It was here that Anne met James Grant, military chaplain to the regiment garrisoned there. They married in 1779 when James was given the charge of the neighbouring parish of Laggan.

When her husband died in 1801, Anne turned to writing to help support herself and her eight remaining children (four daughters had previously died). Among her most famous works are 'Letters from the Mountains' (1807), and 'Memoirs of an American Lady' (1808). She also published 'Essays on the Superstitions of the Highlanders' (1811), perhaps her most interesting work. Her poetry collections include 'Poems of Various Subjects' (1803) and 'The Highlanders and Other poems' (1808).

The success of Anne's publications enabled her to move to Edinburgh where, during the last thirty years of her life, she derived pleasure and company from her literary acquaintances, including Sir Walter Scott. Anne Grant died at 9 Manor Place, Edinburgh, on 7 November 1838 and was buried next to four of her daughters in St. Cuthbert's graveyard in Edinburgh.

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'The Highlanders'

INVERNESS: Laggan

2000s

literature; poetry; audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Anne Grant

This audio extract is from part one of Anne Grant of Laggan's poem, 'The Highlanders'. The poem is contained within the volume, 'Poems on Various Subjects', published by Mrs. Grant in 1803. It is read here by Sue Skelton. <br /> <br /> 'Come, then, explore with me each winding glen,<br /> Far from the noisy haunts of busy men;<br /> Let us with stedfast eye attentive trace<br /> The local habits of the Celtic race;<br /> Renown'd even in those old heroic times,<br /> That live in Ossian's songs, and Runic rhymes;<br /> When ardent Valour call'd his children forth,<br /> And Glory lighten'd through the beaming North:<br /> Whose hardy sons that twilight age adorn,<br /> Like the quick splendours of the Boreal morn,<br /> Fill'd with amaze and awe the world's dread kings,<br /> And bade their eagles stoop with flagging wings.<br /> Come, trace with curious search what secret cause<br /> Each native's heart with strong attraction draws,<br /> Though wealth in happier lands her stores unlock,<br /> To cling with fervour to his native rock:<br /> Why lonely mountains, dark with russet heath,<br /> And rushing streams, and narrow vales beneath;<br /> With more delight his wand'ring eye detain,<br /> Than Forth's rich banks, or Lothian's fertile plain:<br /> The many-colour'd herd, his wealth and pride,<br /> Like deer, through wastes extended, wand'ring wide:<br /> And sportive goats, a bold aspiring flock,<br /> High on the ridge of yon aerial rock,<br /> More self-importance to his mind impart,<br /> And fill with warmer joys his simple heart,<br /> Than all the flocks the southern shepherd pens,<br /> Or the fat herds that graze the Lincoln fens.'<br /> <br /> Mrs. Anne Grant of Laggan was born Anne MacVicar in Glasgow in 1755. She was the daughter of Duncan MacVicar, an army officer. The family spent some time in North America before returning to Scotland to Fort Augustus in 1773. It was here that Anne met James Grant, military chaplain to the regiment garrisoned there. They married in 1779 when James was given the charge of the neighbouring parish of Laggan.<br /> <br /> When her husband died in 1801, Anne turned to writing to help support herself and her eight remaining children (four daughters had previously died). Among her most famous works are 'Letters from the Mountains' (1807), and 'Memoirs of an American Lady' (1808). She also published 'Essays on the Superstitions of the Highlanders' (1811), perhaps her most interesting work. Her poetry collections include 'Poems of Various Subjects' (1803) and 'The Highlanders and Other poems' (1808). <br /> <br /> The success of Anne's publications enabled her to move to Edinburgh where, during the last thirty years of her life, she derived pleasure and company from her literary acquaintances, including Sir Walter Scott. Anne Grant died at 9 Manor Place, Edinburgh, on 7 November 1838 and was buried next to four of her daughters in St. Cuthbert's graveyard in Edinburgh.