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TITLE
'Letters from the Mountains' (1)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ANNE_GRANT_03
PLACENAME
Inverlochy
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmonivaig
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Anne Grant
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1262
KEYWORDS
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from 'Letters from the Mountains: being the real correspondence of a lady between the years 1773 and 1807' by Anne MacVicar Grant, first published in 1806. It is read here by a pupil from Fortrose Academy.

'Oh when shall I ... give you some idea of Inverlochy? Dismal, dismal dismal, it appeared to me; drenched with cold rains, and covered with clouds of unusual darkness. The shore so flat and unmeaning! A long, low moor spreading behind; very little verdure in sight, no peaceful vales or sweet streams; the very river Nevis to me looks gloomy and stupid; 'tis a little Acheron. Ben Nevis is a great clumsy mountain, without any fanciful breaks, or fine marked outline, like those of Morvern. It is great, without sublimity, and seems to nod above this ugly town, and shake a perpetual drizzle from its misty locks.'

Mrs. Anne Grant of Laggan was born Anne MacVicar in Glasgow in 1755. She was the daughter of Duncan MacVicar, an army officer. The family spent some time in North America before returning to Scotland to Fort Augustus in 1773. It was here that Anne met James Grant, military chaplain to the regiment garrisoned there. They married in 1779 when James was given the charge of the neighbouring parish of Laggan.

When her husband died in 1801, Anne turned to writing to help support herself and her eight remaining children (four daughters had previously died). Among her most famous works are 'Letters from the Mountains' (1807), and 'Memoirs of an American Lady' (1808). She also published 'Essays on the Superstitions of the Highlanders' (1811), perhaps her most interesting work. Her poetry collections include 'Poems of Various Subjects' (1803) and 'The Highlanders and Other poems' (1808).

The success of Anne's publications enabled her to move to Edinburgh where, during the last thirty years of her life, she derived pleasure and company from her literary acquaintances, including Sir Walter Scott. Anne Grant died at 9 Manor Place, Edinburgh, on 7 November 1838 and was buried next to four of her daughters in St. Cuthbert's graveyard in Edinburgh.

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'Letters from the Mountains' (1)

INVERNESS: Kilmonivaig

2000s

literary landscapes;

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Anne Grant

This audio extract is from 'Letters from the Mountains: being the real correspondence of a lady between the years 1773 and 1807' by Anne MacVicar Grant, first published in 1806. It is read here by a pupil from Fortrose Academy.<br /> <br /> 'Oh when shall I ... give you some idea of Inverlochy? Dismal, dismal dismal, it appeared to me; drenched with cold rains, and covered with clouds of unusual darkness. The shore so flat and unmeaning! A long, low moor spreading behind; very little verdure in sight, no peaceful vales or sweet streams; the very river Nevis to me looks gloomy and stupid; 'tis a little Acheron. Ben Nevis is a great clumsy mountain, without any fanciful breaks, or fine marked outline, like those of Morvern. It is great, without sublimity, and seems to nod above this ugly town, and shake a perpetual drizzle from its misty locks.'<br /> <br /> Mrs. Anne Grant of Laggan was born Anne MacVicar in Glasgow in 1755. She was the daughter of Duncan MacVicar, an army officer. The family spent some time in North America before returning to Scotland to Fort Augustus in 1773. It was here that Anne met James Grant, military chaplain to the regiment garrisoned there. They married in 1779 when James was given the charge of the neighbouring parish of Laggan.<br /> <br /> When her husband died in 1801, Anne turned to writing to help support herself and her eight remaining children (four daughters had previously died). Among her most famous works are 'Letters from the Mountains' (1807), and 'Memoirs of an American Lady' (1808). She also published 'Essays on the Superstitions of the Highlanders' (1811), perhaps her most interesting work. Her poetry collections include 'Poems of Various Subjects' (1803) and 'The Highlanders and Other poems' (1808). <br /> <br /> The success of Anne's publications enabled her to move to Edinburgh where, during the last thirty years of her life, she derived pleasure and company from her literary acquaintances, including Sir Walter Scott. Anne Grant died at 9 Manor Place, Edinburgh, on 7 November 1838 and was buried next to four of her daughters in St. Cuthbert's graveyard in Edinburgh.