Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
'A place important to me'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_BRIDGET_MACKENZIE_02
PLACENAME
Arnaboll
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Durness
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Bridget Mackenzie
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1265
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

Get Adobe Flash player

'A place important to me', by Bridget Mackenzie, is read here by Elizabeth Parker.

'A place important to me is Arnaboll, on the west side of Loch Hope, in north-west Sutherland. I like it for the beauty of its setting, and for its historical associations. The old stone farmhouse stands in green fields beside the loch, looking across to the peak of Ben Hope. Pretty birchwoods have paths winding along the lochside, and in the spring the fields are thick with primroses and lady's smock. On the hillside behind the house is an old graveyard, with mossy gravestones and daffodils.

Around 1700, it belonged to Donald MacKay of Skerra and his wife, Marion. Donald was a cousin of the great pipe music composer, Iain Dall MacKay, and when Donald and Marion died, in the early 1700s, Iain composed two magnificent laments for them. He had previously made, in 1697, a wonderful Gaelic poem, 'Corrienessan's Lament', in which he described how he set off from Arnaboll to cross the rugged Sutherland mountains, through to Loch Stack. Although he was blind, he had seen the places in his childhood, and gave us remarkably clear descriptions of the landscape.'

Bridget Mackenzie (nee Gordon) is of Scots-Canadian extraction. Born in England in 1933, she was educated at the universities of Oxford and Glasgow. Before her marriage to engineer (and piper) Alex Mackenzie, she was a lecturer in Old Norse at Glasgow University, but retired to bring up their two sons.

Now grandmother of five, she has lived in Sutherland for 25 years, writing books and articles on topics such as piping history and Highland place-names. After the publication of 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland' (1998), the Saltire Society presented her with an award for her contribution to Highland culture. A second volume, dealing with Argyll, appeared in 2004 and she is currently working on the piping traditions of the Western Isles.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

'A place important to me'

SUTHERLAND: Durness

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Bridget Mackenzie

'A place important to me', by Bridget Mackenzie, is read here by Elizabeth Parker.<br /> <br /> 'A place important to me is Arnaboll, on the west side of Loch Hope, in north-west Sutherland. I like it for the beauty of its setting, and for its historical associations. The old stone farmhouse stands in green fields beside the loch, looking across to the peak of Ben Hope. Pretty birchwoods have paths winding along the lochside, and in the spring the fields are thick with primroses and lady's smock. On the hillside behind the house is an old graveyard, with mossy gravestones and daffodils.<br /> <br /> Around 1700, it belonged to Donald MacKay of Skerra and his wife, Marion. Donald was a cousin of the great pipe music composer, Iain Dall MacKay, and when Donald and Marion died, in the early 1700s, Iain composed two magnificent laments for them. He had previously made, in 1697, a wonderful Gaelic poem, 'Corrienessan's Lament', in which he described how he set off from Arnaboll to cross the rugged Sutherland mountains, through to Loch Stack. Although he was blind, he had seen the places in his childhood, and gave us remarkably clear descriptions of the landscape.'<br /> <br /> Bridget Mackenzie (nee Gordon) is of Scots-Canadian extraction. Born in England in 1933, she was educated at the universities of Oxford and Glasgow. Before her marriage to engineer (and piper) Alex Mackenzie, she was a lecturer in Old Norse at Glasgow University, but retired to bring up their two sons.<br /> <br /> Now grandmother of five, she has lived in Sutherland for 25 years, writing books and articles on topics such as piping history and Highland place-names. After the publication of 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland' (1998), the Saltire Society presented her with an award for her contribution to Highland culture. A second volume, dealing with Argyll, appeared in 2004 and she is currently working on the piping traditions of the Western Isles.