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TITLE
'Corrienessan' (2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_BRIDGET_MACKENZIE_CORRIE_02
PLACENAME
Corrienessan
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Durness
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Bridget Mackenzie
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1268
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from Bridget Mackenzie's 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland', first published in 1998. The extract is read by Elizabeth Parker.

'In the first part of the poem he was lamenting the loss of his patron, Colonel Robert MacKay, who had been paying him an allowance. The Colonel's by-name seems to have been 'Corrienessan', since he hunted there so often. The corrie then asked the poet to play him some music, and the second part of the poem, after Iain had played a lament, is the corrie's praise of Iain, followed by a long section of Iain's salute to the corrie, a remarkable passage of nature poetry which became a trend-setter for later Gaelic poets. He was lyrical about the flowers and grasses, lochs and views of the mountains, and gave us a vivid description of a deer hunt. Then he resumed his journey through the hills.

This wonderful poem has the added interest of being the earliest known piobaireachd poem, that is, a literary work modelled on the form and structure of a musical work for the pipe. Several of these poems were made in the 18th century, but this was the first, and the only one made by a man who was not only a bard and a piper, but a fine composer of pipe music too.

He ended his poem by describing the hospitality enjoyed by the hunters in a nearby house, possibly his cousin's house at Arnaboll, and then he turned west, saying he must be off, in order to reach the pass before nightfall.

The piobaireachd works, 'Corrienessan's Salute' and 'Corrienessan's Lament', are named for this place.'

Bridget Mackenzie (nee Gordon) is of Scots-Canadian extraction. Born in England in 1933, she was educated at the universities of Oxford and Glasgow. Before her marriage to engineer (and piper) Alex Mackenzie, she was a lecturer in Old Norse at Glasgow University, but retired to bring up their two sons.

Now grandmother of five, she has lived in Sutherland for 25 years, writing books and articles on topics such as piping history and Highland place-names. After the publication of 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland' (1998), the Saltire Society presented her with an award for her contribution to Highland culture. A second volume, dealing with Argyll, appeared in 2004 and she is currently working on the piping traditions of the Western Isles.

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'Corrienessan' (2)

SUTHERLAND: Durness

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Bridget Mackenzie

This audio extract is from Bridget Mackenzie's 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland', first published in 1998. The extract is read by Elizabeth Parker.<br /> <br /> 'In the first part of the poem he was lamenting the loss of his patron, Colonel Robert MacKay, who had been paying him an allowance. The Colonel's by-name seems to have been 'Corrienessan', since he hunted there so often. The corrie then asked the poet to play him some music, and the second part of the poem, after Iain had played a lament, is the corrie's praise of Iain, followed by a long section of Iain's salute to the corrie, a remarkable passage of nature poetry which became a trend-setter for later Gaelic poets. He was lyrical about the flowers and grasses, lochs and views of the mountains, and gave us a vivid description of a deer hunt. Then he resumed his journey through the hills.<br /> <br /> This wonderful poem has the added interest of being the earliest known piobaireachd poem, that is, a literary work modelled on the form and structure of a musical work for the pipe. Several of these poems were made in the 18th century, but this was the first, and the only one made by a man who was not only a bard and a piper, but a fine composer of pipe music too.<br /> <br /> He ended his poem by describing the hospitality enjoyed by the hunters in a nearby house, possibly his cousin's house at Arnaboll, and then he turned west, saying he must be off, in order to reach the pass before nightfall.<br /> <br /> The piobaireachd works, 'Corrienessan's Salute' and 'Corrienessan's Lament', are named for this place.'<br /> <br /> Bridget Mackenzie (nee Gordon) is of Scots-Canadian extraction. Born in England in 1933, she was educated at the universities of Oxford and Glasgow. Before her marriage to engineer (and piper) Alex Mackenzie, she was a lecturer in Old Norse at Glasgow University, but retired to bring up their two sons.<br /> <br /> Now grandmother of five, she has lived in Sutherland for 25 years, writing books and articles on topics such as piping history and Highland place-names. After the publication of 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland' (1998), the Saltire Society presented her with an award for her contribution to Highland culture. A second volume, dealing with Argyll, appeared in 2004 and she is currently working on the piping traditions of the Western Isles.