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TITLE
Arrowhead
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_ARCH_0007
PLACENAME
Glenbrittle
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Bracadale
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
12819
KEYWORDS
archaeology
Arrowhead

This leaf shaped flint arrowhead, dating from the Neolithic period (3,000 -2,200 BC), was found by chance during forestry planting at Glen Brittle on the Isle of Skye. The arrowhead is made from creamy white flint with tinges of light grey at the distal end and the point. The reverse is flat with some secondary flaking around the base. The obverse, pictured, has flaking either side of a light but evident central ridge along its length. There are two small notches along the margin of one side, each positioned at about one third of the length.

Length: 44 mm; max width: 21 mm; max thickness: 3 mm

Man's first tools and weapons were made from flint as it is tough but can be shaped easily to give sharp edges. A hard stone hammer was used to break off pieces of flint, flakes of which could then be worked more closely to shape arrowheads and other small items. Skilled flint 'knappers' could produce a variety of shapes, and many different ones have been found with dates spread over thousands of years


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Arrowhead

INVERNESS: Bracadale

archaeology

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Artefact Collection, Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

This leaf shaped flint arrowhead, dating from the Neolithic period (3,000 -2,200 BC), was found by chance during forestry planting at Glen Brittle on the Isle of Skye. The arrowhead is made from creamy white flint with tinges of light grey at the distal end and the point. The reverse is flat with some secondary flaking around the base. The obverse, pictured, has flaking either side of a light but evident central ridge along its length. There are two small notches along the margin of one side, each positioned at about one third of the length.<br /> <br /> Length: 44 mm; max width: 21 mm; max thickness: 3 mm<br /> <br /> Man's first tools and weapons were made from flint as it is tough but can be shaped easily to give sharp edges. A hard stone hammer was used to break off pieces of flint, flakes of which could then be worked more closely to shape arrowheads and other small items. Skilled flint 'knappers' could produce a variety of shapes, and many different ones have been found with dates spread over thousands of years <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a><br />