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TITLE
Glamaig, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_CARD_030
PLACENAME
Glamaig
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
12853
KEYWORDS
mountains
hills
roads
Glamaig, Skye

A postcard of Glamaig on the Isle of Skye. Glamaig, with an elevation of 775 metres, is the highest of the Red Hills. Together with the rocky, jagged Black Cuillin ridge, the lower Red Hills (sometimes known as the Red Cuillin) form the Cuillin mountain range. In 1899, Gurkha soldier Harkabir Thapa ran barefoot from Sligachan Hotel to the top of Glamaig and back again in 55 minutes. The Glamaig Hill Race now takes places every July, and it wasn't until the 1980s that Thapa's record was finally broken.

Until the 19th century the Cuillin range, especially the Black Cuillin, were regarded as unclimbable and most of the peaks were not ascended until the mid-to-late 1800s. Two Skye-born climbers, John MacKenzie of Sconser and Sheriff Alexander Nicolson made many significant first ascents in the range and both have peaks named in their honour: Sgurr Mhic Choinnich (MacKenzie's Peak) and Sgurr Alasdair (Alexander's Peak).

The range has also made headlines in more recent times, when John MacLeod of MacLeod put the Black Cuillin on the market for £10 million in 2000, in order to fund repairs of his Clan seat, Dunvegan Castle. In 2003, after enormous public outcry, MacLeod agreed to gift the mountains to the nation on the condition that a charitable trust renovated his castle.


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Glamaig, Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

mountains; hills; roads

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Dualchas Postcards

A postcard of Glamaig on the Isle of Skye. Glamaig, with an elevation of 775 metres, is the highest of the Red Hills. Together with the rocky, jagged Black Cuillin ridge, the lower Red Hills (sometimes known as the Red Cuillin) form the Cuillin mountain range. In 1899, Gurkha soldier Harkabir Thapa ran barefoot from Sligachan Hotel to the top of Glamaig and back again in 55 minutes. The Glamaig Hill Race now takes places every July, and it wasn't until the 1980s that Thapa's record was finally broken.<br /> <br /> Until the 19th century the Cuillin range, especially the Black Cuillin, were regarded as unclimbable and most of the peaks were not ascended until the mid-to-late 1800s. Two Skye-born climbers, John MacKenzie of Sconser and Sheriff Alexander Nicolson made many significant first ascents in the range and both have peaks named in their honour: Sgurr Mhic Choinnich (MacKenzie's Peak) and Sgurr Alasdair (Alexander's Peak).<br /> <br /> The range has also made headlines in more recent times, when John MacLeod of MacLeod put the Black Cuillin on the market for £10 million in 2000, in order to fund repairs of his Clan seat, Dunvegan Castle. In 2003, after enormous public outcry, MacLeod agreed to gift the mountains to the nation on the condition that a charitable trust renovated his castle. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a>