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TITLE
Kyleakin and Beinn-na-Cailleach
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_CARD_064
PLACENAME
Kyleakin
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
12888
KEYWORDS
pier
Kyleakin
Lord Macdonald
New Liverpool
toursits
Kyleakin and Beinn-na-Cailleach

The village of Kyleakin stretches along the shoreline, with houses set back from the road and uninterrupted views of Loch Alsh over to Kyle. Central in this postcard photograph are the remains of the wooden pier. It was likely constructed in the late 1880s to accommodate paddle steamers on the west coast route, which also called across the narrows at Kyle of Lochalsh. At low tide the pier proved very unsatisfactory, gradually fell into disuse, and finally was removed, although some wooden stumps still remain.

Rising behind the village, emphasising the ruggedness of the landscape is Beinn na Cailleach at 733 m.

Kyleakin was once proposed to become a major industrial and commercial centre. In 1811 the landowner, Lord Macdonald commissioned James Gillespie Graham to design a new town, modelled more on a city, with spires, large houses and streets named Mews Lane and King Street. The town was to be called New Liverpool, and it's situation was to take advantage of the shipping lanes and fishing industry. The construction got little farther than several houses when it became apparent that people did not want to be in this remote place and Lord Macdonald's plan ended. Since then Kyleakin has been prosperous in times of the herring fishery, with four curing houses employing many people to clean and salt the herring for the southern markets, but latterly relied on being the gateway for ferry travellers to Skye, and now a peaceful tourist stop.


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Kyleakin and Beinn-na-Cailleach

INVERNESS: Strath

1920s

pier; Kyleakin; Lord Macdonald; New Liverpool; toursits

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Dualchas Postcards

The village of Kyleakin stretches along the shoreline, with houses set back from the road and uninterrupted views of Loch Alsh over to Kyle. Central in this postcard photograph are the remains of the wooden pier. It was likely constructed in the late 1880s to accommodate paddle steamers on the west coast route, which also called across the narrows at Kyle of Lochalsh. At low tide the pier proved very unsatisfactory, gradually fell into disuse, and finally was removed, although some wooden stumps still remain.<br /> <br /> Rising behind the village, emphasising the ruggedness of the landscape is Beinn na Cailleach at 733 m.<br /> <br /> Kyleakin was once proposed to become a major industrial and commercial centre. In 1811 the landowner, Lord Macdonald commissioned James Gillespie Graham to design a new town, modelled more on a city, with spires, large houses and streets named Mews Lane and King Street. The town was to be called New Liverpool, and it's situation was to take advantage of the shipping lanes and fishing industry. The construction got little farther than several houses when it became apparent that people did not want to be in this remote place and Lord Macdonald's plan ended. Since then Kyleakin has been prosperous in times of the herring fishery, with four curing houses employing many people to clean and salt the herring for the southern markets, but latterly relied on being the gateway for ferry travellers to Skye, and now a peaceful tourist stop. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a><br />