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TITLE
Duntulm Bay from Duntulm Castle, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_CARD_154
PLACENAME
Duntulm
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmuir
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
12947
KEYWORDS
landscapes
hills and mountains
Duntulm Bay from Duntulm Castle, Skye

This photograph was taken from the rocky headland where the ruins of Duntulm Castle remain. The postcard is captioned incorrectly; the area pictured below is Port Duntulm or Duntulm Bay not Score Bay. The area has changed hands many times over the centuries with early Viking leaders taking command of the coastline, before battles between the MacLeods and MacDonalds left the MacDonalds in charge, and using Duntulm Castle as residence until 1730.

Looking south from the ruins of the Castle, the ordered fields with neat stone walls and ploughed land show that agriculture is a mainstay of the lifestyle. Port Duntulm provides a shelter to drag boats away from the tideline, and as seen here, a number of small boats are tucked under the shelter of the embankment out of winds that sweep down over the fields. In past years, when sea travel was common, galleons were pulled up on the shores, with keel marks still visible.

Rising behind the settlement is the Hill of Rolling, or Cnoc an Rola. In Discovering Skye, a handbook of Skye's history and legends, Jonathan MacDonald relates the story of this hill. Years ago, justice was passed on a suspected criminal by putting the person in a barrel and rolling him down the hill. If the suspect managed to survive this ordeal he was allowed to go free, but if injuries were sustained he was taken to another hill to sit in judgement before the Chief. There he could put his case forward, and either be released, or if deemed guilty, taken off to yet another hill called the Hanging Knoll, or Cnoc na Croiche where he met his fate.


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Duntulm Bay from Duntulm Castle, Skye

INVERNESS: Kilmuir

landscapes; hills and mountains

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Dualchas Postcards

This photograph was taken from the rocky headland where the ruins of Duntulm Castle remain. The postcard is captioned incorrectly; the area pictured below is Port Duntulm or Duntulm Bay not Score Bay. The area has changed hands many times over the centuries with early Viking leaders taking command of the coastline, before battles between the MacLeods and MacDonalds left the MacDonalds in charge, and using Duntulm Castle as residence until 1730.<br /> <br /> Looking south from the ruins of the Castle, the ordered fields with neat stone walls and ploughed land show that agriculture is a mainstay of the lifestyle. Port Duntulm provides a shelter to drag boats away from the tideline, and as seen here, a number of small boats are tucked under the shelter of the embankment out of winds that sweep down over the fields. In past years, when sea travel was common, galleons were pulled up on the shores, with keel marks still visible.<br /> <br /> Rising behind the settlement is the Hill of Rolling, or Cnoc an Rola. In Discovering Skye, a handbook of Skye's history and legends, Jonathan MacDonald relates the story of this hill. Years ago, justice was passed on a suspected criminal by putting the person in a barrel and rolling him down the hill. If the suspect managed to survive this ordeal he was allowed to go free, but if injuries were sustained he was taken to another hill to sit in judgement before the Chief. There he could put his case forward, and either be released, or if deemed guilty, taken off to yet another hill called the Hanging Knoll, or Cnoc na Croiche where he met his fate. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a><br />