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TITLE
Portree from the Harbour, Isle of Skye
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_CARD_165
PLACENAME
Portree
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
12957
KEYWORDS
pier
boats
herring
Royal Hotel
Beaumont
commercial fishery
Telford
wharf
Portree from the Harbour, Isle of Skye

The arrival to Portree on the Isle of Skye by boat shows the town as a very pleasing sight. The pier and wharf, planned by Thomas Telford, are bordered by shops and houses on the quayside and are overlooked by the curved terraces. The town of Portree grew from the harbour front, with fishing and other commercial traffic making it a busy pier. It was only with the construction of substantial roads throughout Skye that the harbour started to lose its prominence in the daily life of the town.

On Skye, fishing has always been of significance. Fishing provided an ideal source of food in an area where agricultural crops could not always be depended upon, and it provided many men and in fewer numbers, women, with much needed employment. Fisheries reports show that until World War I, herring was the most important fishery on Skye, although the yield could vary considerably from one year to the next. There was also a commercial fishery of cod and ling, and to a lesser extent, lobster.

During the heyday of herring fishing it was one of the most important commercial activities in the country. Thousands of boats were involved in the Scottish herring industry, with a catch worth over a million pounds a year. The waters around Skye were fished not just by Skyemen, but by boats from all over the country. This postcard shows a good number of boats tied at the pier, but during the season the harbour could be packed with fishing boats.

The substantial houses on the curve of the harbour are on Beaumont Crescent, with Bosville Terrace above on the right. The Royal Hotel is the large building above Beaumont Crescent.


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Portree from the Harbour, Isle of Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

1900s

pier; boats; herring; Royal Hotel; Beaumont; commercial fishery; Telford; wharf

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Dualchas Postcards

The arrival to Portree on the Isle of Skye by boat shows the town as a very pleasing sight. The pier and wharf, planned by Thomas Telford, are bordered by shops and houses on the quayside and are overlooked by the curved terraces. The town of Portree grew from the harbour front, with fishing and other commercial traffic making it a busy pier. It was only with the construction of substantial roads throughout Skye that the harbour started to lose its prominence in the daily life of the town.<br /> <br /> On Skye, fishing has always been of significance. Fishing provided an ideal source of food in an area where agricultural crops could not always be depended upon, and it provided many men and in fewer numbers, women, with much needed employment. Fisheries reports show that until World War I, herring was the most important fishery on Skye, although the yield could vary considerably from one year to the next. There was also a commercial fishery of cod and ling, and to a lesser extent, lobster.<br /> <br /> During the heyday of herring fishing it was one of the most important commercial activities in the country. Thousands of boats were involved in the Scottish herring industry, with a catch worth over a million pounds a year. The waters around Skye were fished not just by Skyemen, but by boats from all over the country. This postcard shows a good number of boats tied at the pier, but during the season the harbour could be packed with fishing boats.<br /> <br /> The substantial houses on the curve of the harbour are on Beaumont Crescent, with Bosville Terrace above on the right. The Royal Hotel is the large building above Beaumont Crescent. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a><br />