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TITLE
Portree from the East
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_CARD_183
PLACENAME
Portree
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1920s; 1930s
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
12972
KEYWORDS
villages
harbours
Thomas Telford
Portree Bay
hotels
Portree from the East

The slipway at Scorrybreac gives a good view of Portree harbour across the bay. There is a popular walk from the village along the shore to the Black Rock and beyond to the Bile (or Beal). This area of land was purchased in 1993 by the Nicolson Trust, to celebrate the long connection of the Clan with Skye.

Several of the more important buildings in the village can be seen in this image, including the Gathering Hall with its row of gabled windows in the centre above Quay Street, the Free Church immediately behind and Meall House, painted white, to the right. Constructed c1800 by J Gillespie Graham, Meall House is the oldest surviving building in Portree, and features in Daniell's engraving of 1819, solitary and devoid of trees and shrubs. It was originally used as a jail and court house, latterly as the Tourist office and currently (2011) it houses the offices of Feisean nan Gaidheal.

The Telford-designed harbour lies below the wooded Meall, also known as 'Meall na h-Acairsaid' or 'hill of the anchorage', and on some old maps is referred to as Fancy Hill. This latter term may derive from the gardens of trees and shrubs apparently laid out in the 1830s by Dr Alexander MacLeod, factor to Sir Godfrey Macdonald. The octagonal tower jutting above the trees has been variously described as a beacon, apothecary's tower and memorial. Plans for it were referred to in the Inverness Courier of 1834 and despite being severley damaged by a storm in 1978, the tower was rebuilt and remains a popular viewpoint.

The Marine Temperance Hotel on the extreme left of the harbour has now gone, to be replaced by a fuel depot. Ambitious plans have been made to develop the harbour area, to include a marina and a new road round the base of the Meall, but funding has yet to be identified and discussions continue on the future of this most valuable village asset.


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Portree from the East

INVERNESS: Portree

1920s; 1930s

villages; harbours; Thomas Telford; Portree Bay; hotels

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Dualchas Postcards

The slipway at Scorrybreac gives a good view of Portree harbour across the bay. There is a popular walk from the village along the shore to the Black Rock and beyond to the Bile (or Beal). This area of land was purchased in 1993 by the Nicolson Trust, to celebrate the long connection of the Clan with Skye. <br /> <br /> Several of the more important buildings in the village can be seen in this image, including the Gathering Hall with its row of gabled windows in the centre above Quay Street, the Free Church immediately behind and Meall House, painted white, to the right. Constructed c1800 by J Gillespie Graham, Meall House is the oldest surviving building in Portree, and features in Daniell's engraving of 1819, solitary and devoid of trees and shrubs. It was originally used as a jail and court house, latterly as the Tourist office and currently (2011) it houses the offices of Feisean nan Gaidheal.<br /> <br /> The Telford-designed harbour lies below the wooded Meall, also known as 'Meall na h-Acairsaid' or 'hill of the anchorage', and on some old maps is referred to as Fancy Hill. This latter term may derive from the gardens of trees and shrubs apparently laid out in the 1830s by Dr Alexander MacLeod, factor to Sir Godfrey Macdonald. The octagonal tower jutting above the trees has been variously described as a beacon, apothecary's tower and memorial. Plans for it were referred to in the Inverness Courier of 1834 and despite being severley damaged by a storm in 1978, the tower was rebuilt and remains a popular viewpoint. <br /> <br /> The Marine Temperance Hotel on the extreme left of the harbour has now gone, to be replaced by a fuel depot. Ambitious plans have been made to develop the harbour area, to include a marina and a new road round the base of the Meall, but funding has yet to be identified and discussions continue on the future of this most valuable village asset. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a><br />