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TITLE
Loch-na-Cairidh, Dunan, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_CARD_252
PLACENAME
Dunan
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1930s; 1940s
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
13031
KEYWORDS
Loch na Cairidh
sea lochs
sea fishing
fish trap
coastlines
Loch-na-Cairidh, Dunan, Skye

This stretch of water, Loch-na-Cairidh, lies between the small community of Dunan on the eastern side of Skye, and the island of Scalpay, just seen as a low spit of land on the top left of this image. Cairidh is the Gaelic word for a fish-trap or weir, a semi-circular stone barrier built above the low tide mark, often at the head of an inlet. The movement of the tide caught the fish behind the barrier and they could be removed with small nets. This was very much a subsistence fishing technique and no longer in use, but the name continues and indeed the broken cairidhs can still be seen in places along the coast. The hand coloured photograph was taken from Dunan, with Creag Strollamus prominent in the background.


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Loch-na-Cairidh, Dunan, Skye

INVERNESS: Strath

1930s; 1940s

Loch na Cairidh; sea lochs; sea fishing; fish trap; coastlines

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Dualchas Postcards

This stretch of water, Loch-na-Cairidh, lies between the small community of Dunan on the eastern side of Skye, and the island of Scalpay, just seen as a low spit of land on the top left of this image. Cairidh is the Gaelic word for a fish-trap or weir, a semi-circular stone barrier built above the low tide mark, often at the head of an inlet. The movement of the tide caught the fish behind the barrier and they could be removed with small nets. This was very much a subsistence fishing technique and no longer in use, but the name continues and indeed the broken cairidhs can still be seen in places along the coast. The hand coloured photograph was taken from Dunan, with Creag Strollamus prominent in the background. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a><br />