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TITLE
Lealt Sea Salmon Fishing Crew
EXTERNAL ID
HCD_DAVIDBANKS_043
PLACENAME
Lealt
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmuir
DATE OF IMAGE
1945
PERIOD
1940s
CREATOR
James/David Banks
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
13099
KEYWORDS
anchor
net
bag net
diatomite
salmon
industry
government departments
Lealt Sea Salmon Fishing Crew

The sea salmon fishing crew based at Lealt on the Trotternish peninsula, Isle of Skye are pictured here. The man on the left has been identified as the skipper, John Cameron. An important part of the job was keeping all the equipment and boats in good order during the season. The men here are putting the anchor and net chains in tar to protect them against the salt water. Nearby was an area where the salmon nets would be hung from high poles to dry and be repaired.

The building in the background is part of the ruins of the diatomite works. The Skye Diatomite Kieselguhr Co was started c1897, later becoming the British Diatomite Co c1906. Diatomite is sediment formed from microscopic algae rich in silica. It was used commercially in production of face powders, fillers and fire-proofing. Diatomite was mined here initially between 1886 and 1904. The industry suffered from inexperienced management, difficulties in processing and inefficient transport systems. The industry revived between 1951 and 1961 but with very little return for the investors. The salmon fishing and the diatomite works didn't always sit together harmoniously. In the mid-1950s there was a complaint made against the diatomite works claiming they were dumping dirt into the Lealt River, leaving the bay red for miles and spoiling the fish catches. This led to reports to local Fishery Officers, Department of Agriculture and the local Sanitary Inspector.



West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd
In 1944 James Banks & Sons, Perth bought the sea salmon fishing lease for the Kilmuir Estates, Skye from A Powrie & Co, and formed the West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd to operate the lease. The company continued until 1962 when it was sold to Kenneth Matheson, Portree.

When Banks and Sons took over the lease there were fishing stations at Lealt, Rigg (Borreraig), Staffin, Portree, Camustianavaig, Balmeanach and Brochel Castle (on Raasay). In 1956, Balmeanach and Camustianavaig merged to become the Braes station, with three men employed, while the others usually had four-man crews. The company employed about 28 men each year with jobs being offered to the same men each season before new workers were hired.

The season began late April/early May and ran through to the end of August. Several men were also employed during the winter months to take ice down from the dam at Sluggans for storage at the ice house at Portree harbour. Each crew member would receive a contract with information on wages, proposed bonus scheme and work hours and were provided with oilskins and rubber boots.

The catch was divided into salmon, grilse and trout, with grilse numbers being the highest. The total annual catch was approximately 3000 fish in the late 1940s and early 1950s. A record high of nearly 10,000 fish were caught in 1957.


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Lealt Sea Salmon Fishing Crew

INVERNESS: Kilmuir

1940s

anchor; net; bag net; diatomite; salmon; industry; government departments

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

David Banks: West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd

The sea salmon fishing crew based at Lealt on the Trotternish peninsula, Isle of Skye are pictured here. The man on the left has been identified as the skipper, John Cameron. An important part of the job was keeping all the equipment and boats in good order during the season. The men here are putting the anchor and net chains in tar to protect them against the salt water. Nearby was an area where the salmon nets would be hung from high poles to dry and be repaired. <br /> <br /> The building in the background is part of the ruins of the diatomite works. The Skye Diatomite Kieselguhr Co was started c1897, later becoming the British Diatomite Co c1906. Diatomite is sediment formed from microscopic algae rich in silica. It was used commercially in production of face powders, fillers and fire-proofing. Diatomite was mined here initially between 1886 and 1904. The industry suffered from inexperienced management, difficulties in processing and inefficient transport systems. The industry revived between 1951 and 1961 but with very little return for the investors. The salmon fishing and the diatomite works didn't always sit together harmoniously. In the mid-1950s there was a complaint made against the diatomite works claiming they were dumping dirt into the Lealt River, leaving the bay red for miles and spoiling the fish catches. This led to reports to local Fishery Officers, Department of Agriculture and the local Sanitary Inspector. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <b>West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd</b><br /> In 1944 James Banks & Sons, Perth bought the sea salmon fishing lease for the Kilmuir Estates, Skye from A Powrie & Co, and formed the West Highland Salmon Fisheries Co Ltd to operate the lease. The company continued until 1962 when it was sold to Kenneth Matheson, Portree. <br /> <br /> When Banks and Sons took over the lease there were fishing stations at Lealt, Rigg (Borreraig), Staffin, Portree, Camustianavaig, Balmeanach and Brochel Castle (on Raasay). In 1956, Balmeanach and Camustianavaig merged to become the Braes station, with three men employed, while the others usually had four-man crews. The company employed about 28 men each year with jobs being offered to the same men each season before new workers were hired. <br /> <br /> The season began late April/early May and ran through to the end of August. Several men were also employed during the winter months to take ice down from the dam at Sluggans for storage at the ice house at Portree harbour. Each crew member would receive a contract with information on wages, proposed bonus scheme and work hours and were provided with oilskins and rubber boots. <br /> <br /> The catch was divided into salmon, grilse and trout, with grilse numbers being the highest. The total annual catch was approximately 3000 fish in the late 1940s and early 1950s. A record high of nearly 10,000 fish were caught in 1957. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com ">Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a>