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TITLE
'Memoirs of a Highland Lady' (3)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ELIZ_GRANT_03
PLACENAME
Rothiemurchus
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Duthil and Rothiemurchus
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Elizabeth Grant
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1310
KEYWORDS
diarists
autobiographies
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from chapter nine of Elizabeth Grant of Rothiemurchus's autobiography, 'Memoirs of a Highland Lady', first published in 1897. It is read here by Sue Skelton.

'A walk to the Croft led us quite in another direction. We generally went to the White Gate, and through the new garden on to the Milltown muir past Peter the Pensioner's wooden house, and then climbing over the wooden railing wandered on among the birch woods till we reached the gate at the Lochan Mor; that passed, we got into the fir wood, refreshed ourselves in the proper season with blackberries and cranberries, then climbing another fence re-entered the birch wood, in the midst of which nestled the two cottages called the Croft. The houses were not adjoining; the upper one connected with the farm offices was the family dwelling, the lower and newer one at a little distance was for strangers. Old Mrs. Cameron, who was by this time nearly blind, sat beside the fire in a bonnet and shawl as if ready for walking, talking little, but sighing a great deal. Miss Mary bustled about in her managing way as kind as her nature would let her be; there was little fear of any one getting a Saturday's kebbock at the Croft! A little honey with a barley scone was the extent of Miss Mary's hospitality. They had always a good fire and a kind welcome for the Laird's children.'

Elizabeth Grant of Rothiemurchus was born in Edinburgh on 7 May 1797, the eldest of five children of Sir John Peter Grant, laird of Rothiemurchus. She spent her childhood mostly on the family estate and in London, entering Edinburgh society in 1814. The family returned to Rothiemurchus in 1820 and from around 1826, Elizabeth wrote articles and stories for various magazines to supplement the family income.

In 1827 the family moved to Bombay where Elizabeth met her future husband, Colonel Henry Smith. The couple married in 1829 and returned to Ireland the following year to live on Colonel Smith's estate in county Wicklow. Elizabeth continued to supplement the family income by writing while, at the same time, raising her three children, Jane, Anne and John. Between 1845 and 1854 she wrote a private memoir of her years spent in Scotland. This was to become her most famous work - 'Memoirs of a Highland Lady' - edited and abridged by her niece and first published in 1897.

Other works published posthumously include 'The Irish Journals of Elizabeth Smith, 1840-1850' (1980), 'The Highland Lady in Ireland' (1991), and 'A Highland Lady in France' (1996). Lady Grant died on 16 November 1885 at her home in county Wicklow.

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'Memoirs of a Highland Lady' (3)

INVERNESS: Duthil and Rothiemurchus

2000s

diarists; autobiographies; audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Elizabeth Grant

This audio extract is from chapter nine of Elizabeth Grant of Rothiemurchus's autobiography, 'Memoirs of a Highland Lady', first published in 1897. It is read here by Sue Skelton.<br /> <br /> 'A walk to the Croft led us quite in another direction. We generally went to the White Gate, and through the new garden on to the Milltown muir past Peter the Pensioner's wooden house, and then climbing over the wooden railing wandered on among the birch woods till we reached the gate at the Lochan Mor; that passed, we got into the fir wood, refreshed ourselves in the proper season with blackberries and cranberries, then climbing another fence re-entered the birch wood, in the midst of which nestled the two cottages called the Croft. The houses were not adjoining; the upper one connected with the farm offices was the family dwelling, the lower and newer one at a little distance was for strangers. Old Mrs. Cameron, who was by this time nearly blind, sat beside the fire in a bonnet and shawl as if ready for walking, talking little, but sighing a great deal. Miss Mary bustled about in her managing way as kind as her nature would let her be; there was little fear of any one getting a Saturday's kebbock at the Croft! A little honey with a barley scone was the extent of Miss Mary's hospitality. They had always a good fire and a kind welcome for the Laird's children.'<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Grant of Rothiemurchus was born in Edinburgh on 7 May 1797, the eldest of five children of Sir John Peter Grant, laird of Rothiemurchus. She spent her childhood mostly on the family estate and in London, entering Edinburgh society in 1814. The family returned to Rothiemurchus in 1820 and from around 1826, Elizabeth wrote articles and stories for various magazines to supplement the family income. <br /> <br /> In 1827 the family moved to Bombay where Elizabeth met her future husband, Colonel Henry Smith. The couple married in 1829 and returned to Ireland the following year to live on Colonel Smith's estate in county Wicklow. Elizabeth continued to supplement the family income by writing while, at the same time, raising her three children, Jane, Anne and John. Between 1845 and 1854 she wrote a private memoir of her years spent in Scotland. This was to become her most famous work - 'Memoirs of a Highland Lady' - edited and abridged by her niece and first published in 1897. <br /> <br /> Other works published posthumously include 'The Irish Journals of Elizabeth Smith, 1840-1850' (1980), 'The Highland Lady in Ireland' (1991), and 'A Highland Lady in France' (1996). Lady Grant died on 16 November 1885 at her home in county Wicklow.