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TITLE
'A Guide to the Pictish Stones' (1)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ELIZ_SUTHERLAND_01
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Elizabeth Sutherland
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1311
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from Elizabeth Sutherland's book, 'A Guide to the Pictish Stones', published in 1997. It is read here by Elizabeth Parker.

'Who were the Picts?'

The Pictish nation emerged from a collection of warrior Celtic tribes who, centuries BC, had emigrated from Europe into Northern Britain. They first came into documented history as a nation in AD 297 when a Roman writer, Eumenius, wrote that the Britons were accustomed only to fighting 'their half-naked enemies - the Picts and the Irish'. Thus they became a historical people at that point with a collective name and they remained a united nation until about AD 840 when the Irish Scot, Kenneth Mac Alpin defeated them, and the land of the Picts became known as Scotland.

They probably got their name 'Painted ones' from the Roman soldiers who patrolled the Antonine wall and had to deal with them face-to-face. The Irish called them Cruithni which translates as 'people of the designs'. It is almost certain that they tattooed or painted their faces and bodies. What they called themselves is not known.'

Elizabeth Sutherland, born Marshall, had an Orcadian father and a mother from Fife, which, she claims, makes her a Pict. After training at Edinburgh University to be a social worker, she married an Episcopalian clergyman and lived in four Scottish parishes, ending up in Fortrose, on the Black Isle.

On her late husband's retirement in 1982 she took over Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie and was responsible for its becoming a Pictish Centre. Her work on Coinneach Odhar - the Brahan Seer - established her as a serious historian. The subject was especially relevant, as he ended his days in a burning barrel of tar at Chanonry Point, Fortrose.

Recently she has turned her hand to Black Isle local history in a series of pamphlets for Black Isle Press.

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'A Guide to the Pictish Stones' (1)

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Elizabeth Sutherland

This audio extract is from Elizabeth Sutherland's book, 'A Guide to the Pictish Stones', published in 1997. It is read here by Elizabeth Parker.<br /> <br /> 'Who were the Picts?'<br /> <br /> The Pictish nation emerged from a collection of warrior Celtic tribes who, centuries BC, had emigrated from Europe into Northern Britain. They first came into documented history as a nation in AD 297 when a Roman writer, Eumenius, wrote that the Britons were accustomed only to fighting 'their half-naked enemies - the Picts and the Irish'. Thus they became a historical people at that point with a collective name and they remained a united nation until about AD 840 when the Irish Scot, Kenneth Mac Alpin defeated them, and the land of the Picts became known as Scotland.<br /> <br /> They probably got their name 'Painted ones' from the Roman soldiers who patrolled the Antonine wall and had to deal with them face-to-face. The Irish called them Cruithni which translates as 'people of the designs'. It is almost certain that they tattooed or painted their faces and bodies. What they called themselves is not known.'<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Sutherland, born Marshall, had an Orcadian father and a mother from Fife, which, she claims, makes her a Pict. After training at Edinburgh University to be a social worker, she married an Episcopalian clergyman and lived in four Scottish parishes, ending up in Fortrose, on the Black Isle. <br /> <br /> On her late husband's retirement in 1982 she took over Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie and was responsible for its becoming a Pictish Centre. Her work on Coinneach Odhar - the Brahan Seer - established her as a serious historian. The subject was especially relevant, as he ended his days in a burning barrel of tar at Chanonry Point, Fortrose.<br /> <br /> Recently she has turned her hand to Black Isle local history in a series of pamphlets for Black Isle Press.