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TITLE
'A Guide to the Pictish Stones' (2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ELIZ_SUTHERLAND_02
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Elizabeth Sutherland
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1313
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from Elizabeth Sutherland's book, 'A Guide to the Pictish Stones', published in 1997. It is read here by Elizabeth Parker.

'Where were the Picts?

The borders between the Picts, Britons and Angles south of the Clyde/Forth valley and, after AD 500, the Scots from Ireland who settled in Argyll, were fairly fluid. But the heart of Pictland was centred in Tayside, Grampian and Highland regions, the territory north and north-east of the Antonine wall including Orkney and Shetland but excluding Strathclyde. Before AD 500, they ruled as far as the Outer Hebrides. As late as c. 565 the Scottish saint Columba thought it appropriate to ask permission from the Pictish King Brude in Inverness to establish his Scottish monastery in Iona. Isolated symbol stones can still be seen in Skye, Wester Ross and Argyll, but the majority are to be found east of Drumalban, that great spiny watershed formed by mountains that extend the length of Scotland nearer the west coast.'

Elizabeth Sutherland, born Marshall, had an Orcadian father and a mother from Fife, which, she claims, makes her a Pict. After training at Edinburgh University to be a social worker, she married an Episcopalian clergyman and lived in four Scottish parishes, ending up in Fortrose, on the Black Isle. On her late husband's retirement in 1982 she took over Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie and was responsible for its becoming a Pictish Centre. Her work on Coinneach Odhar - the Brahan Seer - established her as a serious historian. The subject was especially relevant, as he ended his days in a burning barrel of tar at Chanonry Point, Fortrose.

Recently she has turned her hand to Black Isle local history in a series of pamphlets for Black Isle Press.

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'A Guide to the Pictish Stones' (2)

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Elizabeth Sutherland

This audio extract is from Elizabeth Sutherland's book, 'A Guide to the Pictish Stones', published in 1997. It is read here by Elizabeth Parker.<br /> <br /> 'Where were the Picts?<br /> <br /> The borders between the Picts, Britons and Angles south of the Clyde/Forth valley and, after AD 500, the Scots from Ireland who settled in Argyll, were fairly fluid. But the heart of Pictland was centred in Tayside, Grampian and Highland regions, the territory north and north-east of the Antonine wall including Orkney and Shetland but excluding Strathclyde. Before AD 500, they ruled as far as the Outer Hebrides. As late as c. 565 the Scottish saint Columba thought it appropriate to ask permission from the Pictish King Brude in Inverness to establish his Scottish monastery in Iona. Isolated symbol stones can still be seen in Skye, Wester Ross and Argyll, but the majority are to be found east of Drumalban, that great spiny watershed formed by mountains that extend the length of Scotland nearer the west coast.'<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Sutherland, born Marshall, had an Orcadian father and a mother from Fife, which, she claims, makes her a Pict. After training at Edinburgh University to be a social worker, she married an Episcopalian clergyman and lived in four Scottish parishes, ending up in Fortrose, on the Black Isle. On her late husband's retirement in 1982 she took over Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie and was responsible for its becoming a Pictish Centre. Her work on Coinneach Odhar - the Brahan Seer - established her as a serious historian. The subject was especially relevant, as he ended his days in a burning barrel of tar at Chanonry Point, Fortrose.<br /> <br /> Recently she has turned her hand to Black Isle local history in a series of pamphlets for Black Isle Press.