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TITLE
Old Keiss Castle, Keiss
EXTERNAL ID
HC_ARCH2_1981-82_81061011
PLACENAME
Keiss
DISTRICT
Caithness - Eastern
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
PERIOD
1980s
SOURCE
The Highland Council Archaeology Unit
ASSET ID
13216
KEYWORDS
castles
Old Keiss Castle, Keiss

Keiss Castle was built by the Earl of Caithness (Campbells) in the early 1600s. It is a small castle with its walls bounded by the cliff's edge. The original entrance was destroyed by the cliff face falling away. It appears to have built purely for seaward attacks as there is no strong evidence of protection from the landward side.

On this site, Calder points out in his "History of Caithness" once stood an ancient fortalice called "Raddar". If such a place ever existed not a vestige of its history survives. Nor does an examination of the ruined tower or its foundations reveal any evidence of a former structure.

The castle was probably abandoned in the early 1700s. The castle was eventually turned over to the Sinclairs of Dunbeath. They replaced it with the new Keiss Castle built in 1755 further from the cliff.

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Old Keiss Castle, Keiss

CAITHNESS: Wick

1980s

castles

The Highland Council Archaeology Unit

Keiss Castle was built by the Earl of Caithness (Campbells) in the early 1600s. It is a small castle with its walls bounded by the cliff's edge. The original entrance was destroyed by the cliff face falling away. It appears to have built purely for seaward attacks as there is no strong evidence of protection from the landward side. <br /> <br /> On this site, Calder points out in his "History of Caithness" once stood an ancient fortalice called "Raddar". If such a place ever existed not a vestige of its history survives. Nor does an examination of the ruined tower or its foundations reveal any evidence of a former structure.<br /> <br /> The castle was probably abandoned in the early 1700s. The castle was eventually turned over to the Sinclairs of Dunbeath. They replaced it with the new Keiss Castle built in 1755 further from the cliff.