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TITLE
Hugh Miller's Cottage, Church Street, Cromarty
EXTERNAL ID
HC_ARCH3_1983-84_84051014
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1980s
SOURCE
The Highland Council Archaeology Unit
ASSET ID
13245
KEYWORDS
geology
Hugh Miller's Cottage, Church Street, Cromarty

Built in 1711, this house is the birthplace of the eminent geologist, writer and editor Hugh Miller (1802-56) and is located in the town of Cromarty in Highland Council area. The thatched cottage was opened as a museum in 1900.

In 1938 it passed from Cromarty Town Council into the care of the National Trust for Scotland. It houses original artefacts, as well as giving an insight into 18th Century life in the town.

Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. A stonemason to trade, he went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland.

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Hugh Miller's Cottage, Church Street, Cromarty

ROSS: Cromarty

1980s

geology

The Highland Council Archaeology Unit

Built in 1711, this house is the birthplace of the eminent geologist, writer and editor Hugh Miller (1802-56) and is located in the town of Cromarty in Highland Council area. The thatched cottage was opened as a museum in 1900. <br /> <br /> In 1938 it passed from Cromarty Town Council into the care of the National Trust for Scotland. It houses original artefacts, as well as giving an insight into 18th Century life in the town.<br /> <br /> Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. A stonemason to trade, he went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland.