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TITLE
Carn Liath - a broch near Golspie
EXTERNAL ID
HC_ARCH3_1983-84_84071010
PLACENAME
Golspie
DISTRICT
Golspie, Rogart and Lairg
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Golspie
PERIOD
1980s
SOURCE
The Highland Council Archaeology Unit
ASSET ID
13248
KEYWORDS
brochs
ancient ruins
archaeology
Carn Liath - a broch near Golspie

Adjacent to A9, north east of Golspie.

Occupying a rocky terrace overlooking the Sutherland coast, this broch has walls that still stand 3.6 m (12 ft) high in places and the entrance passage and lintelled doorway are well preserved.

First excavated in the 19th century by the Duke of Sutherland, this site looked like a cairn, but as the loose lichen-covered stones were cleared, the broch emerged.

Many artefacts, including pottery, flint chips, stone hammers, mortars and pestles, querns, whorls, shale rings, long-handled bone combs, a whale bone club, a silver fibula, steatite cups and an iron blade, were recovered. This suggests that the site was inhabited over many centuries.

Further excavations took place in 1986 and a Bronze Age cist burial with a food vessel was discovered. The remains of buildings outside the broch indicate a later use when a fortified dwelling was no longer necessary.

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Carn Liath - a broch near Golspie

SUTHERLAND: Golspie

1980s

brochs; ancient ruins; archaeology

The Highland Council Archaeology Unit

Adjacent to A9, north east of Golspie.<br /> <br /> Occupying a rocky terrace overlooking the Sutherland coast, this broch has walls that still stand 3.6 m (12 ft) high in places and the entrance passage and lintelled doorway are well preserved.<br /> <br /> First excavated in the 19th century by the Duke of Sutherland, this site looked like a cairn, but as the loose lichen-covered stones were cleared, the broch emerged. <br /> <br /> Many artefacts, including pottery, flint chips, stone hammers, mortars and pestles, querns, whorls, shale rings, long-handled bone combs, a whale bone club, a silver fibula, steatite cups and an iron blade, were recovered. This suggests that the site was inhabited over many centuries.<br /> <br /> Further excavations took place in 1986 and a Bronze Age cist burial with a food vessel was discovered. The remains of buildings outside the broch indicate a later use when a fortified dwelling was no longer necessary.