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TITLE
Entrance passage to Broch near Totaig.
EXTERNAL ID
HC_ARCH4_87072_008
PLACENAME
Glenelg
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Glenelg
PERIOD
1980s
SOURCE
The Highland Council Archaeology Unit
ASSET ID
13290
KEYWORDS
Broch
Totaig
Loch Duich
Glenelg
Iron Age
ruins
Entrance passage to Broch near Totaig.

Entrance into the Broch, west-south-west of Totaig, north of Glenelg, in Skye and Lochalsh. Located on the opposite shore of Loch Duich from Eilean Donan Castle, the broch has never been restored, and therefore is in a fairly weathered state. Despite this, many of its original features are still recognisable, including a staircase, gallery and a mural chamber.

A broch is an Iron Age dry-stone structure unique to Scotland. The sophisticated use of dry-stone has led to their classification as 'complex Atlantic roundhouse'. Their original usage is a matter of debate: some have proposed that they were essentially military structures, while today many assert that they had a multitude of uses.

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Entrance passage to Broch near Totaig.

INVERNESS: Glenelg

1980s

Broch; Totaig; Loch Duich; Glenelg; Iron Age; ruins

The Highland Council Archaeology Unit

Entrance into the Broch, west-south-west of Totaig, north of Glenelg, in Skye and Lochalsh. Located on the opposite shore of Loch Duich from Eilean Donan Castle, the broch has never been restored, and therefore is in a fairly weathered state. Despite this, many of its original features are still recognisable, including a staircase, gallery and a mural chamber.<br /> <br /> A broch is an Iron Age dry-stone structure unique to Scotland. The sophisticated use of dry-stone has led to their classification as 'complex Atlantic roundhouse'. Their original usage is a matter of debate: some have proposed that they were essentially military structures, while today many assert that they had a multitude of uses.